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852 records – page 1 of 86.

Cold provocation test results from a 1985 survey of hard-rock miners in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234933
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Aug;13(4):343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1987
Author
P L Pelmear
J. Roos
D. Leong
L. Wong
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Support Services Branch, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Aug;13(4):343-7
Date
Aug-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cold Temperature
Fingers - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Ontario
Raynaud Disease - etiology - physiopathology
Skin temperature
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
A total of 143 miners, 6 ex-miners, and 42 referents from five mines in northern Ontario were examined with a cold provocation test. The skin temperatures, measured by thermocouples at the tips of the fingers and thumbs were recorded at 5-s intervals throughout the immersion in cold water (10 degrees C) for 10 min and during the recovery period. The finger skin temperature was followed until 99% recovery had occurred as compared to the starting temperature. For the referents and the vibration-exposed subjects, the results by separate stage of the Taylor-Pelmear scale for hand-arm vibration syndrome were compared. There were statistically significant differences in the mean finger temperature at the 50, 75, 90, and 95% recovery times between stages 0, 0T/0N, and stages 1 through 3 combined, as well as significant differences between stages 1, 2, and 3. The mean temperature at 10 min and the mean hyperemia temperature for eight fingers combined were compared between the miners and referents. There were significant differences in the mean temperature at 10 min and in the hyperemia temperature between the referents and miners in stage 0T/0N, as well as between the referents and the miners in stages 1 through 3 combined. For the worst finger (defined as that with the lowest temperature at 10 min) there was an increasing trend towards a lower hyperemia temperature and delay in recovery time from stage 0 to stages 2 and 3 combined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3433036 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic characteristics of working conditions and state of adaptation in drivers of underground dump trucks at mines in the Kola polar region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235303
Source
Gig Sanit. 1987 May;(5):81-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1987

Silica exposure and rheumatoid arthritis: a follow up study of granite workers 1940-81.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235315
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Apr 18;294(6578):997-1000
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-1987
Author
M. Klockars
R S Koskela
E. Järvinen
P J Kolari
A. Rossi
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Apr 18;294(6578):997-1000
Date
Apr-18-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - etiology
Dust - adverse effects
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Quartz - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
The incidence and prevalence of subjects awarded disability pensions and the prevalence of subjects receiving free medicines because of rheumatoid arthritis were studied in a Finnish cohort of 1026 granite workers hired between 1940 and 1971 and followed up until 31 December 1981. The incidence of awards of disability pensions because of rheumatoid arthritis during 1969-81, the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis on 31 December 1981, and the prevalence of subjects receiving free medicines for rheumatoid arthritis at the end of 1981 were significantly higher among the granite workers than in the general male population of the same age. Retrospective analysis of the records of all patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the cohort showed a predominance of a severe, serologically positive and erosive form of rheumatoid arthritis, usually with an age at onset of 50 or over. The possible aetiological or pathophysiological role of granite dust in rheumatoid arthritis may be based on the effects of quartz on the immune system.
Notes
Cites: J Exp Med. 1966 Aug 1;124(2):141-544288309
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1962 Feb;5:10-813909330
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1968 Nov;184(5):395-4024308036
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1972 Dec 29;200:94-1054122427
Cites: Am J Med. 1973 Oct;55(3):515-244355171
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1974 Aug;110(2):115-254137927
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1976 Mar;113(3):393-51083176
Cites: Br Med J. 1978 Nov 11;2(6148):1326-8719380
Cites: Infect Immun. 1979 Aug;25(2):513-20226477
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980 Jun;40(4):311-86251534
Cites: Nephron. 1980;26(5):219-246252491
Cites: J Pathol. 1981 Feb;133(2):123-97205442
Cites: Crit Rev Toxicol. 1982 Oct;10(4):303-196293769
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol Suppl. 1982;47:31-426984774
Cites: Scand J Rheumatol Suppl. 1982;47:5-136984776
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1984 May;73(5):1462-726325504
Cites: Histopathology. 1984 Jul;8(4):693-7036479909
Cites: Lancet. 1984 Oct 6;2(8406):799-8026148534
Cites: Lancet. 1985 Aug 10;2(8450):305-72862470
Cites: Science. 1985 Dec 13;230(4731):1277-804071052
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Aug 9;2(8502):305-92874329
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Aug 9;2(8502):310-32426542
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Feb;13(1):18-253576141
Cites: Thorax. 1953 Mar;8(1):29-3713038735
Cites: Br Med J. 1953 Dec 5;2(4848):1231-613106392
Cites: AMA Arch Ind Hyg Occup Med. 1954 Jan;9(1):29-3613113736
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 1955 Jun;14(2):150-814388590
Cites: Br J Exp Pathol. 1968 Oct;49(5):465-764302496
PubMed ID
2823951 View in PubMed
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[Radio-ecological situation in the area of JSC "Priargunsky Production Mining and Chemical Association"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263741
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
N K Shandala
M P Semenova
D V Isaev
S M Kiselev
V A Seregin
A V Titov
A A Filonova
L A Zhuravleva
A M Marenny
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):14-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Ecological and Environmental Phenomena
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Mining
Radon
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Uranium
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
In order to assess the radioecological situation created in the area of the location of diversified uranium mining enterprise "Priargunsky Production Mining and Chemical Association" (PIMCU) there was investigated the radioactivity of a number of the compartments of environment, both at the industrial site and beyond it, as well as the volume activity of radon inside the ground and working premises. Radioecological situation in the vicinity of the uranium mines was performed in comparison with the background (fixed reference, control) district, where there is no uranium mining. Performed studies have shown the significant excess content of 226Ra, 232Th, 210Pb, 222Rn in soil, water open water bodies and local foods near uranium mines compared to areas outside the zone of influence of uranium mining that allows to make a conclusion about the significant technogenic pollution of local areas of the plant and adjoining territory.
PubMed ID
25842487 View in PubMed
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Quality assessment of data discrimination using self-organizing maps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263863
Source
J Biomed Inform. 2014 Oct;51:210-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Alexey Mekler
Dmitri Schwarz
Source
J Biomed Inform. 2014 Oct;51:210-8
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Mining - methods - standards
Databases, Factual - classification - standards
Meaningful Use - standards
Neural Networks (Computer)
Pattern Recognition, Automated - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Research Design - standards
Russia
Abstract
One of the important aspects of the data classification problem lies in making the most appropriate selection of features. The set of variables should be small and, at the same time, should provide reliable discrimination of the classes. The method for the discriminating power evaluation that enables a comparison between different sets of variables will be useful in the search for the set of variables.
A new approach to feature selection is presented. Two methods of evaluation of the data discriminating power of a feature set are suggested. Both of the methods implement self-organizing maps (SOMs) and the newly introduced exponents of the degree of data clusterization on the SOM. The first method is based on the comparison of intraclass and interclass distances on the map. Another method concerns the evaluation of the relative number of best matching unit's (BMUs) nearest neighbors of the same class. Both methods make it possible to evaluate the discriminating power of a feature set in cases when this set provides nonlinear discrimination of the classes.
Current algorithms in program code can be downloaded for free at http://mekler.narod.ru/Science/Articles_support.html, as well as the supporting data files.
PubMed ID
24924268 View in PubMed
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Large-scale monitoring and assessment of metal contamination in surface water of the Selenga River Basin (2007-2009).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264476
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Feb;22(4):2856-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Bulat Nadmitov
Seongjin Hong
Sang In Kang
Jang Min Chu
Bair Gomboev
Lunten Janchivdorj
Chang-Hee Lee
Jong Seong Khim
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Feb;22(4):2856-67
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Geography
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Mining
Mongolia
Rivers - chemistry
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - prevention & control
Water Quality - standards
Abstract
An extensive and year-round survey was conducted to assess metal pollution in vast watershed areas of the Selenga River Basin (2007-2009), which provided baseline heavy metal database for the future management. Sources and environmental hazard and risk indices associated with metal pollution were evidenced across the countries of Mongolia and Russia (Buryatia Republic). In general, the concentrations of heavy metals in river water of Mongolia were greater than those of Russia, expect for the upstream of the Dzhida River in Russia. The spatial distribution generally indicated that metal pollution in the Selenga River was mainly associated with the activities in the Mongolian upstream regions. Similar pollution sources of metals between river water and wastewater associated with surrounding activities were found across the industrial and mining areas. Compositional patterns of metals suggested their sources were independent of each other, with hot spots in certain sites. Our measurements indicated that about 63 % of the locations surveyed (48 of 76) exceeded the critical heavy metal pollution index of 100, identifying possible harmful effects on aquatic ecosystems through metal pollution. Zinc was found to be the chemical of priority concern, as more than half of the locations exceeded the corresponding water quality guideline. Other metals including Mn, Fe, Cr, Cu, and As might be problematic in the Selenga River Basin considering the occurrence and their concentrations. Results of our extensive survey during the period of 3 years indicated that urgent action would be necessary in timely manner to improve water quality and mitigate the impact of heavy metals on aquatic environment of the Selenga River Basin.
PubMed ID
25217283 View in PubMed
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Rare earth elements in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems in the eastern Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289905
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18; 19(10):1336-1345
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-18-2017
Author
Gwyneth Anne MacMillan
John Chételat
Joel P Heath
Raymond Mickpegak
Marc Amyot
Author Affiliation
Centre for Northern Studies, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, CanadaH2V 2S9. m.amyot@umontreal.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18; 19(10):1336-1345
Date
Oct-18-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Carbon Isotopes - analysis
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food chain
Fresh Water - chemistry
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Metals, Rare Earth - analysis
Mining
Nitrogen Isotopes - analysis
Seawater - chemistry
Abstract
Few ecotoxicological studies exist for rare earth elements (REEs), particularly field-based studies on their bioaccumulation and food web dynamics. REE mining has led to significant environmental impacts in several countries (China, Brazil, U.S.), yet little is known about the fate and transport of these contaminants of emerging concern. Northern ecosystems are potentially vulnerable to REE enrichment from prospective mining projects at high latitudes. To understand how REEs behave in remote northern food webs, we measured REE concentrations and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (?15N, ?13C) in biota from marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems of the eastern Canadian Arctic (N = 339). Wildlife harvesting and tissue sampling was partly conducted by local hunters through a community-based monitoring project. Results show that REEs generally follow a coherent bioaccumulation pattern for sample tissues, with some anomalies for redox-sensitive elements (Ce, Eu). Highest REE concentrations were found at low trophic levels, especially in vegetation and aquatic invertebrates. Terrestrial herbivores, ringed seal, and fish had low total REE levels in muscle tissue (?REE for 15 elements
PubMed ID
28879355 View in PubMed
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[Features of health disorders in miners employed at northern copper-nickel mines].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290160
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(5):455-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
S V Siurin
V V Shilov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(5):455-9
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Copper
Humans
Male
Mining - standards - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
Nickel
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - standards
Public Health - methods
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the influence of different working conditions on the health of 1523 copper-nickel miners of the Kola High North. The low degree of mechanization of mining operations was established to be related to more higher levels of vibration, noise and physical overloads. The working in such conditions, when compared with high mining mechanization, leads to a decrease in the number of conditionally healthy workers (12% and 20.7%, p
PubMed ID
29424205 View in PubMed
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Musculoskeletal symptoms and exposure to whole-body vibration among open-pit mine workers in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290389
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2017 Jun 19; 30(4):553-564
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-19-2017
Author
Lage Burström
Anna Aminoff
Bodil Björ
Satu Mänttäri
Tohr Nilsson
Hans Pettersson
Hannu Rintamäki
Ingemar Rödin
Victor Shilov
Ljudmila Talykova
Arild Vaktskjold
Jens Wahlström
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden (Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine). lage.burstrom@umu.se.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2017 Jun 19; 30(4):553-564
Date
Jun-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Automobile Driving
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Miners
Mining - methods
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
This cross-sectional questionnaire study was carried out at 4 open-pit mines in Finland, Norway, Russia and Sweden as part of the MineHealth project. The aim has been to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms between drivers of mining vehicles and non-drivers.
The mine workers were asked whether they had suffered from any musculoskeletal symptoms during the previous 12 months in specified body regions, and to grade the severity of these symptoms during the past month. They were also asked about their daily driving of mining vehicles.
The questionnaire was completed by 1323 workers (757 vehicle drivers) and the reported prevalence and severity of symptoms were highest for the lower back, followed by pain in the neck, shoulder and upper back. Drivers in the Nordic mines reported fewer symptoms than non-drivers, while for Russian mine workers the results were the opposite of that. The daily driving of mining vehicles had no significant association with the risk of symptoms. Female drivers indicated a higher prevalence of symptoms as compared to male drivers.
The study provided only weak support for the hypothesis that drivers of vehicles reported a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms than non-vehicle drivers. There were marked differences in the prevalence of symptoms among workers in various enterprises, even though the nature of the job tasks was similar. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4):553-564.
PubMed ID
28584322 View in PubMed
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Radionuclides in the lichen-caribou-human food chain near uranium mining operations in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20969
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 1999 Jul;107(7):527-537
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
  1 website  
Author
Thomas, PA
Gates, TE
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. thomasp@sask.usask.ca
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 1999 Jul;107(7):527-537
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food chain
Food contamination, radioactive
Gamma Rays
Humans
Lichens - metabolism
Male
Mining
Radiation Dosage
Radioisotopes - analysis
Reindeer - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
The richest uranium ore bodies ever discovered (Cigar Lake and McArthur River) are presently under development in northeastern Saskatchewan. This subarctic region is also home to several operating uranium mines and aboriginal communities, partly dependent upon caribou for subsistence. Because of concerns over mining impacts and the efficient transfer of airborne radionuclides through the lichen-caribou-human food chain, radionuclides were analyzed in tissues from 18 barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus). Radionuclides included uranium (U), radium (226Ra), lead (210Pb), and polonium (210Po) from the uranium decay series; the fission product (137Cs) from fallout; and naturally occurring potassium (40K). Natural background radiation doses average 2-4 mSv/year from cosmic rays, external gamma rays, radon inhalation, and ingestion of food items. The ingestion of 210Po and 137Cs when caribou are consumed adds to these background doses. The dose increment was 0.85 mSv/year for adults who consumed 100 g of caribou meat per day and up to 1.7 mSv/year if one liver and 10 kidneys per year were also consumed. We discuss the cancer risk from these doses. Concentration ratios (CRs), relating caribou tissues to lichens or rumen (stomach) contents, were calculated to estimate food chain transfer. The CRs for caribou muscle ranged from 1 to 16% for U, 6 to 25% for 226Ra, 1 to 2% for 210Pb, 6 to 26% for 210Po, 260 to 370% for 137Cs, and 76 to 130% for 40K, with 137Cs biomagnifying by a factor of 3-4. These CRs are useful in predicting caribou meat concentrations from the lichens, measured in monitoring programs, for the future evaluation of uranium mining impacts on this critical food chain.
PubMed ID
10378999 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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852 records – page 1 of 86.