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852 records – page 1 of 86.

[Case-control study of lung cancer and combined home and work radon exposure in the town of Lermontov].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126504
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):705-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
O A Pakholkina
M V Zhukovskii
I V Iarmoshenko
V L Lezhnin
S P Vereiko
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):705-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Alpha Particles
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Mining
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Radon - adverse effects
Russia
Uranium - adverse effects
Abstract
Relation between the risk of lung cancer and combined home and work indoor radon exposure was studied on the example of the population of Lermontov town (Stavropol Region, Russia). The town is situated in the former uranium mining area. Case (121 lung cancer cases) and control (196 individuals free of lung cancer diagnosis) groups of the study included both ex-miners and individuals that were not involved in the uranium industry. Home and work radon exposures were estimated using archive data as well as contemporary indoor measurements. The results of our study support the conclusion about the effect of radon exposure on the lung cancer morbidity.
PubMed ID
22384722 View in PubMed
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The validity of heart failure diagnoses obtained from administrative registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126870
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Apr;20(2):254-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Markku Mähönen
Antti Jula
Kennet Harald
Riitta Antikainen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Tanja Zeller
Stefan Blankenberg
Veikko Salomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. markku.mahonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Apr;20(2):254-9
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Data Mining
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Predictive value of tests
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Population-based administrative registers could be used for identifying heart failure (HF) cases. However, the validity of the classification obtained from administrative registers is not known.
The validity of HF diagnoses obtained by record linkage of administrative databases in Finland was assessed against classification by three independent physicians.
Data from the nationwide registers in Finland - the Hospital Discharge Register, Causes of Death Register, Drug Reimbursement Register, and pharmacy prescription data - were linked with the FINRISK 1997 survey data. Cases with hospitalizations before the survey date with HF as one of the discharge diagnoses, cases with special reimbursement for HF drugs before the survey date and cases with the use of furosemide before the survey date were classified as HF in the registers. All these cases, cases with baseline brain natriuretic peptide > 100 pg/ml, and cases with use of digoxin were independently assessed by two physicians as HF/no HF. Discrepant cases were solved by a third physician. This classification was considered as the gold standard, against which the registers were assessed.
The specificity of the registers was 99.7% (95% CI 99.5-99.8%), positive predictive value 85.9% (95% CI 79.7-90.5%), negative predictive value 97.9% (95% CI 97.6-98.2%), and sensitivity 48.5% (95% CI 42.9-54.2%).
Classification obtained from administrative registers has high specificity and can be used in follow-up studies with HF as an end point. Sensitivity is modest and administrative data should be used with caution for surveillance.
PubMed ID
22345696 View in PubMed
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Rising prevalence of vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis: validation of administrative definitions for diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127062
Source
Mult Scler. 2012 Sep;18(9):1310-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Ruth Ann Marrie
Bo Nancy Yu
Stella Leung
Lawrence Elliott
Patricia Caetano
Sharon Warren
Christina Wolfson
Scott B Patten
Lawrence W Svenson
Helen Tremlett
John Fisk
James F Blanchard
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. rmarrie@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Mult Scler. 2012 Sep;18(9):1310-9
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Data Mining
Databases, Factual
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - diagnosis - epidemiology
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Time Factors
Vascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite the importance of comorbidity in multiple sclerosis (MS), methods for comorbidity assessment in MS are poorly developed.
We validated and applied administrative case definitions for diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in MS.
Using provincial administrative data we identified persons with MS and a matched general population cohort. Case definitions for diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia were derived using hospital, physician, and prescription claims, and validated in 430 persons with MS. We examined temporal trends in the age-adjusted prevalence of these conditions from 1984-2006.
Agreement between various case definitions and medical records ranged from kappa (?) =0.51-0.69 for diabetes, ? =0.21-0.71 for hyperlipidemia, and ? =0.52-0.75 for hypertension. The 2005 age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes was similar in the MS (7.62%) and general populations (8.31%; prevalence ratio [PR] 0.91; 0.81-1.03). The age-adjusted prevalence did not differ for hypertension (MS: 20.8% versus general: 22.5% [PR 0.91; 0.78-1.06]), or hyperlipidemia (MS: 13.8% versus general: 15.2% [PR 0.90; 0.67-1.22]). The prevalence of all conditions rose in both populations over the study period.
Administrative data are a valid means of tracking diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in MS. The prevalence of these comorbidities is similar in the MS and general populations.
PubMed ID
22328682 View in PubMed
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Counter-memory activism in the aftermath of tragedy: a case study of the Westray Families Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134363
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2011 Feb;48(1):23-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Norine Verberg
Christopher G Davis
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, St. Francis Xavier University, PO Box 5000, Antigonish, NS, Canada B2G 2E8. nverberg@stfx.ca
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2011 Feb;48(1):23-45
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Canada
Family - psychology
Humans
Male
Mining
Narration
Abstract
Narratives are critical to how people understand themselves and the significant events of their lives. Drawing upon social memory theory and the social constructionist approach to social problems, this study provides a narrative analysis of the counter-memory activism of the Westray Families Group (WFG), which formed after 26 men died in the 1992 Westray mine explosion (Plymouth, NS). Against alternative explanations promoted by more powerful stakeholders, the WFG adopted and weaved a corporate negligence narrative into their commemorative activism. This study illustrates how a small families group can draw reflexively upon and reshape cultural scripts to narrate how others should remember and respond to key events.
PubMed ID
21595369 View in PubMed
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Environmental factors in an Ontario community with disparities in colorectal cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104417
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2014 May;6(3):175-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Jeavana Sritharan
Rishikesan Kamaleswaran
Ken McFarlan
Manon Lemonde
Clemon George
Otto Sanchez
Author Affiliation
University of Ontario Institute of Technology. jeavana.sritharan@mail.utoronto.ca.
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2014 May;6(3):175-85
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Ontario - epidemiology
Pesticides
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
In Ontario, there are significant geographical disparities in colorectal cancer incidence. In particular, the northern region of Timiskaming has the highest incidence of colorectal cancer in Ontario while the southern region of Peel displays the lowest. We aimed to identify non-nutritional modifiable environmental factors in Timiskaming that may be associated with its diverging colorectal cancer incidence rates when compared to Peel.
We performed a systematic review to identify established and proposed environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence, created an assessment questionnaire tool regarding these environmental exposures, and applied this questionnaire among 114 participants from the communities of Timiskaming and Peel.
We found that tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, residential use of organochlorine pesticides, and potential exposure to toxic metals were dominant factors among Timiskaming respondents. We found significant differences regarding active smoking, chronic alcohol use, reported indoor and outdoor household pesticide use, and gold and silver mining in the Timiskaming region.
This study, the first to assess environmental factors in the Timiskaming community, identified higher reported exposures to tobacco, alcohol, pesticides, and mining in Timiskaming when compared with Peel. These significant findings highlight the need for specific public health assessments and interventions regarding community environmental exposures.
PubMed ID
24762360 View in PubMed
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Rare earth elements in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems in the eastern Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289905
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18; 19(10):1336-1345
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-18-2017
Author
Gwyneth Anne MacMillan
John Chételat
Joel P Heath
Raymond Mickpegak
Marc Amyot
Author Affiliation
Centre for Northern Studies, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, CanadaH2V 2S9. m.amyot@umontreal.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Oct 18; 19(10):1336-1345
Date
Oct-18-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Carbon Isotopes - analysis
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food chain
Fresh Water - chemistry
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Metals, Rare Earth - analysis
Mining
Nitrogen Isotopes - analysis
Seawater - chemistry
Abstract
Few ecotoxicological studies exist for rare earth elements (REEs), particularly field-based studies on their bioaccumulation and food web dynamics. REE mining has led to significant environmental impacts in several countries (China, Brazil, U.S.), yet little is known about the fate and transport of these contaminants of emerging concern. Northern ecosystems are potentially vulnerable to REE enrichment from prospective mining projects at high latitudes. To understand how REEs behave in remote northern food webs, we measured REE concentrations and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (?15N, ?13C) in biota from marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems of the eastern Canadian Arctic (N = 339). Wildlife harvesting and tissue sampling was partly conducted by local hunters through a community-based monitoring project. Results show that REEs generally follow a coherent bioaccumulation pattern for sample tissues, with some anomalies for redox-sensitive elements (Ce, Eu). Highest REE concentrations were found at low trophic levels, especially in vegetation and aquatic invertebrates. Terrestrial herbivores, ringed seal, and fish had low total REE levels in muscle tissue (?REE for 15 elements
PubMed ID
28879355 View in PubMed
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[Features of health disorders in miners employed at northern copper-nickel mines].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290160
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(5):455-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
S V Siurin
V V Shilov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(5):455-9
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Copper
Humans
Male
Mining - standards - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
Nickel
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - standards
Public Health - methods
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the influence of different working conditions on the health of 1523 copper-nickel miners of the Kola High North. The low degree of mechanization of mining operations was established to be related to more higher levels of vibration, noise and physical overloads. The working in such conditions, when compared with high mining mechanization, leads to a decrease in the number of conditionally healthy workers (12% and 20.7%, p
PubMed ID
29424205 View in PubMed
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Musculoskeletal symptoms and exposure to whole-body vibration among open-pit mine workers in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290389
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2017 Jun 19; 30(4):553-564
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-19-2017
Author
Lage Burström
Anna Aminoff
Bodil Björ
Satu Mänttäri
Tohr Nilsson
Hans Pettersson
Hannu Rintamäki
Ingemar Rödin
Victor Shilov
Ljudmila Talykova
Arild Vaktskjold
Jens Wahlström
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden (Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine). lage.burstrom@umu.se.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2017 Jun 19; 30(4):553-564
Date
Jun-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Automobile Driving
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Miners
Mining - methods
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
This cross-sectional questionnaire study was carried out at 4 open-pit mines in Finland, Norway, Russia and Sweden as part of the MineHealth project. The aim has been to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms between drivers of mining vehicles and non-drivers.
The mine workers were asked whether they had suffered from any musculoskeletal symptoms during the previous 12 months in specified body regions, and to grade the severity of these symptoms during the past month. They were also asked about their daily driving of mining vehicles.
The questionnaire was completed by 1323 workers (757 vehicle drivers) and the reported prevalence and severity of symptoms were highest for the lower back, followed by pain in the neck, shoulder and upper back. Drivers in the Nordic mines reported fewer symptoms than non-drivers, while for Russian mine workers the results were the opposite of that. The daily driving of mining vehicles had no significant association with the risk of symptoms. Female drivers indicated a higher prevalence of symptoms as compared to male drivers.
The study provided only weak support for the hypothesis that drivers of vehicles reported a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms than non-vehicle drivers. There were marked differences in the prevalence of symptoms among workers in various enterprises, even though the nature of the job tasks was similar. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4):553-564.
PubMed ID
28584322 View in PubMed
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852 records – page 1 of 86.