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Research on contested ground: women, mining and health

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76384
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 2005 Spring; 3(1):9-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spring 2005
Research on Contested Ground: Women, Mining and Health Catherine Coumans, MiningWatch Canada Acknowledgements: The author worked closely with the main proponents of a study in Labrador West, including Cathie Robichaud and Jennie Robichaud of the Femmes Francophones de l’Ouest du Labrador
  1 document  
Author
Coumans, Catherine
Author Affiliation
Mining Watch Canada
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 2005 Spring; 3(1):9-32
Date
Spring 2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
338207
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Women; Mining; health care; community-centered research; Canada
Abstract
Researching health impacts of mining on women living in mining towns is fraught with social and methodological complexities. Mining is the primary source of income in a mining town and usually strongly supported politically. While women themselves are less likely to be employed in the mine, the relate to men with jobs in the mine. Women are frequently in a marginal economic and social position in mining towns. These factors limit the likelihood of finding funding and political support for a large-scale health study and inhibit access to information and participation of women in research focusing on potential health impacts from mining. Community centered participatory research methods are relatively inexpensive and can overcome barriers to women's participation since both the focus population and the researchers are women from the mining community. Community-centered research can potentially enhance the level of knowledge about the impacts of mining on women's health and develop the capacity of women in mining communities to protect themselves and their families from the effects of mining. Methodological considerations related to community-centered research and its alternatives, are explored in this paper in the context of a research project in West Labrador.
Notes
Future issues of the journal will be published online
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Circumpolar system safety engineering

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76765
Source
Pages 390-393 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
procedures for 31 entities with operations that include reindeer herding, seafood pro- cessing. hotel operations, catering and janitorial con- tractors, North Slope of Alaska oil drilling rigs, a security contractor, hard rock diamond drilling, Red Dog Mine, Arctic Museum, and Sivunniigvik or Spirit Camp
  1 document  
Author
Pascal, S.
Author Affiliation
NANA Development Corporation, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Source
Pages 390-393 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Communication
Direct and indirect costs of accidents
Kotzebue
NANA
Occupational safety and health training
Preliminary hazard analysis (PHA)
Red Dog Mine
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Risk communication and trust in decision-maker action: a case study of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107705
Source
Pages 456-462 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):456-462
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Risk communication and trust in decision-maker action: a case study of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan Cynthia G. Jardine1*, Laura Banfield2 , S. Michelle Driedger3 and Christopher M. Furgal4 '5 1 School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  1 document  
Author
Cynthia G Jardine
Laura Banfield
S Michelle Driedger
Christopher M Furgal
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. cindy.jardine@ualberta.ca
Source
Pages 456-462 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):456-462
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arsenicals - adverse effects
Communication
Decision Making, Organizational
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Remediation - methods
Gold
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Mining - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Oxides - adverse effects
Risk Management - organization & administration
Trust
Abstract
The development and implementation of a remediation plan for the residual arsenic trioxide stored at the former Giant Mine site in the Canadian Northwest Territories has raised important issues related to trust. Social and individual trust of those responsible for making decisions on risks is critically important in community judgements on risk and the acceptability of risk management decisions. Trust is known to be affected by value similarity and confidence in past performance, which serve as interacting sources of cooperation in acting toward a common goal.
To explore the elements of trust associated with the development and implementation of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight purposively selected key informants representing both various interested and affected parties and the two government proponents.
Five primary issues related to trust were identified by the participants: (1) a historical legacy of mistrust between the community (particularly Aboriginal peoples) and government; (2) barriers to building trust with the federal government; (3) limited community input and control over the decision-making process; (4) the conflicted and confounded role of the government agencies being both proponent and regulator, and the resulting need for independent oversight; and (5) distrust of the government to commit to the perpetual care required for the remediation option selected.
The dual-mode model of trust and confidence was shown to be a useful framework for understanding the pivotal role of trust in the development of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan. Failure to recognize issues of trust based on value dissimilarity and lack of confidence based on past performance have resulted in a lack of cooperation characterized by delayed remediation and a prolonged and expensive consultation process. Government recognition of the importance of trust to these issues will hopefully improve future communication and public engagement endeavours.
Notes
Cites: Risk Anal. 1999 Aug;19(4):689-70110765431
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):16-3716541817
Cites: Risk Anal. 1997 Feb;17(1):43-549131825
Cites: Risk Anal. 2003 Aug;23(4):705-1612926564
PubMed ID
23984297 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of Canadian health administrative databases in identifying patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a validation study using the medical records of rheumatologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114676
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jessica Widdifield
Sasha Bernatsky
J Michael Paterson
Karen Tu
Ryan Ng
J Carter Thorne
Janet E Pope
Claire Bombardier
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology
Data Mining - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Fees and Charges - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatology - statistics & numerical data
Single-Payer System - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health administrative data can be a valuable tool for disease surveillance and research. Few studies have rigorously evaluated the accuracy of administrative databases for identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Our aim was to validate administrative data algorithms to identify RA patients in Ontario, Canada.
We performed a retrospective review of a random sample of 450 patients from 18 rheumatology clinics. Using rheumatologist-reported diagnosis as the reference standard, we tested and validated different combinations of physician billing, hospitalization, and pharmacy data.
One hundred forty-nine rheumatology patients were classified as having RA and 301 were classified as not having RA based on our reference standard definition (study RA prevalence 33%). Overall, algorithms that included physician billings had excellent sensitivity (range 94-100%). Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) were modest to excellent and increased when algorithms included multiple physician claims or specialist claims. The addition of RA medications did not significantly improve algorithm performance. The algorithm of "(1 hospitalization RA code ever) OR (3 physician RA diagnosis codes [claims] with =1 by a specialist in a 2-year period)" had a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 85%, PPV of 76%, and negative predictive value of 98%. Most RA patients (84%) had an RA diagnosis code present in the administrative data within ±1 year of a rheumatologist's documented diagnosis date.
We demonstrated that administrative data can be used to identify RA patients with a high degree of accuracy. RA diagnosis date and disease duration are fairly well estimated from administrative data in jurisdictions of universal health care insurance.
PubMed ID
23592598 View in PubMed
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Assessing ecotoxicity of biomining effluents in stream ecosystems by in situ invertebrate bioassays: A case study in Talvivaara, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284211
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Jan;36(1):147-155
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Johanna Salmelin
Matti T Leppänen
Anna K Karjalainen
Kari-Matti Vuori
Almut Gerhardt
Heikki Hämäläinen
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Jan;36(1):147-155
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Biological Assay
Ecosystem
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Insects
Mining
Oligochaeta - drug effects
Rivers - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Mining of sulfide-rich pyritic ores produces acid mine drainage waters and has induced major ecological problems in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Biomining utilizes microbes to extract metals from the ore, and it has been suggested as a new sustainable way to produce metals. However, little is known of the potential ecotoxicological effects of biomining. In the present study, biomining impacts were assessed using survival and behavioral responses of aquatic macroinvertebrates at in situ exposures in streams. The authors used an impedance conversion technique to measure quantitatively in situ behavioral responses of larvae of the regionally common mayfly, Heptagenia dalecarlica, to discharges from the Talvivaara mine (Sotkamo, Northern Finland), which uses a biomining technique. Behavioral responses measured in 3 mine-impacted streams were compared with those measured in 3 reference streams. In addition, 3-d survival of the mayfly larvae and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was measured in the study sites. Biomining impacts on stream water quality included increased concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, and metals, especially manganese, cadmium, zinc, sodium, and calcium. Survival of the invertebrates in the short term was not affected by the mine effluents. In contrast, apparent behavioral changes in mayfly larvae were detected, but these responses were not consistent among sites, which may reflect differing natural water chemistry of the study sites. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:147-155. © 2016 SETAC.
PubMed ID
27253991 View in PubMed
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[Serum hormonal levels in diamond-extracting industry workers of Yakutia, with surface and underground type of work].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128022
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2011;(10):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
V G Seliatitskaia
O I Kuz'minova
Iu A Nikolaev
Zh M Galanova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2011;(10):23-7
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Diamond
Endocrine System Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Energy Metabolism
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Russia
Thyroxine - blood
Triiodothyronine - blood
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors studied influence of work type (surface or underground) on serum hormonal levels in male workers of "International" mine within diamond-extracting complex of Yakutia-Sakha Republic. The results obtained show compensation and adaptation changes of endocrine system in males engaged into underground work vs. those of surface work.
PubMed ID
22242281 View in PubMed
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Conflict resolution by participatory management: remote sensing and GIS as tools for communicating land-use needs for reindeer herding in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180904
Source
Ambio. 2003 Dec;32(8):557-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Per Sandström
Tina Granqvist Pahlén
Lars Edenius
Hans Tømmervik
Olle Hagner
Leif Hemberg
Håkan Olsson
Karin Baer
Thomas Stenlund
Lars Göran Brandt
Mikael Egberth
Author Affiliation
Remote Sensing Laboratory, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences SLU, Umeå, Sweden. per.sandstrom@mso.umt.edu
Source
Ambio. 2003 Dec;32(8):557-67
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Communication
Conservation of Natural Resources
Decision Making
Environment
Forestry
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Mining
Problem Solving
Recreation
Reindeer
Sweden
Abstract
When seeking to resolve complex land-management issues, geographical assessment of resources that are in short supply or in dispute can aid the communication of knowledge and the understanding among and between different stakeholders. In this paper, we illustrate how remote sensing and GIS can be used to gather and compile information regarding land-use activities and patterns among reindeer herders and other land users (forestry, mining, tourism, etc) in northern Sweden. The project represents a novel user-oriented effort largely based on the work carried out by the principal end user, i.e. the reindeer herders themselves. The basis for development of land-use plans for reindeer husbandry, was the following: to collect and digitally systemize traditional ecological and landscape knowledge of reindeer habitat use; to integrate this information with results from field inventories and satellite-based vegetation classifications; to map activities of other land users. The resulting land-use plans provide information that can facilitate consultation between the reindeer herders and other stakeholders and can facilitate operational work in reindeer management. This project can serve as a model for participatory involvement and planning, bringing indigenous knowledge and advanced remote-sensing techniques together in an interactive process.
PubMed ID
15049353 View in PubMed
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Review of 36,537 patient records for tooth health and longevity of dental restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116345
Source
Caries Res. 2013;47(4):309-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
J. Suni
H. Vähänikkilä
J. Päkkilä
L. Tjäderhane
M. Larmas
Author Affiliation
Health Center of Vantaa, Vantaa, Finland.
Source
Caries Res. 2013;47(4):309-17
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Data Mining
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Dental Records
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Oral Health
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
To develop an automatic system for utilizing electronic dental records, a data mining system to extract the diagnostic and treatment codes from the records for an intermediate file and automatic drawing of Kaplan-Meier-type survival curves was first created. Then this intermediate file was analyzed with SAS software for the scientific determination of Kaplan-Meier survival of tooth/surface-specific healthy time and survival of restorations in each permanent tooth, health center, and age cohort and also combined. All patients born in 1985, 1990 or 1995 in 28 health centers in Finland were analyzed. Patients classified as caries-active were those who had caries in any first permanent molar under the age of 8 years, while resistant patients did not have caries in these teeth before 10 years. In the younger age cohorts, a shortening of survival of caries-free teeth was seen. The shortest caries-free survival was seen in mandibular and maxillary molars in the youngest age cohort. Occlusal surfaces of molars determined their caries onsets and proximal caries occurred equally in molars, incisors and premolars, whereas canines or mandibular incisors did not have caries in these age cohorts. Caries-prone subjects had the shortest survival in all their teeth. The median longevity of all restorations was 11.7 years, with great variation between health centers and teeth. Because of the great variation between individual teeth, the tooth-specific approach seems appropriate in both caries epidemiology and material sciences.
PubMed ID
23406626 View in PubMed
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The introduction and evaluation of mobile devices to improve access to patient records: a catalyst for innovation and collaboration at BCCA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116532
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;183:232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jonn Wu
John Waldron
Shaina Hood
Adam Kahnamelli
Mohamed Khan
Jeff Barnett
John French
Stacey Slager
Shadi Melhem
Omid Shabestari
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, British Columbia. johnwu@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;183:232-7
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cellular Phone
Computers, Handheld
Cooperative Behavior
Data Mining - methods
Electronic Health Records
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Neoplasms
Telemedicine - methods
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Prompt and efficient access to patient records is vital in providing optimal patient care. The Cancer Agency Information System (CAIS) is the primary patient record repository for the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) but is only accessible on traditional computer workstations. The BCCA clinics have significant space limitations resulting in multiple health care professionals sharing each workstation. Furthermore, workstations are not available in examination rooms. A novel and cost efficient solution is necessary to improve clinician access to CAIS. This prompted the BCCA and IMITS to embark on an innovative provincial collaboration to introduce and evaluate the impact of a mobile device to improve access to CAIS. The project consisted of 2 phases with over 50 participants from multiple clinical disciplines across BCCA sites. Phase I evaluated the adoptability, effectiveness and costs associated with providing access to CAIS using a generic viewer (Citrix). Phase II incorporated the feedback and findings from Phase I to make available a customized mobile device-specific application. Phase II also addressed privacy and security requirements.
PubMed ID
23388289 View in PubMed
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The development of a standardized software platform to support provincial population-based cancer outcomes units for multiple tumour sites: OaSIS - Outcomes and Surveillance Integration System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116533
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;183:98-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jonn Wu
Cheryl Ho
Janessa Laskin
David Gavin
Paul Mak
Keith Duncan
John French
Colleen McGahan
Sherry Reid
Stephen Chia
Heidi Cheung
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia. johnwu@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;183:98-103
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Data Mining - methods
Database Management Systems
Databases, Factual
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval - methods
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Software
Software Design
Abstract
Understanding the impact of treatment policies on patient outcomes is essential in improving all aspects of patient care. The BC Cancer Agency is a provincial program that provides cancer care on a population basis for 4.5 million residents. The Lung and Head & Neck Tumour Groups planned to create a generic yet comprehensive software infrastructure that could be used by all Tumour Groups: the Outcomes and Surveillance Integration System (OaSIS). The primary goal was the development of an integrated database that will amalgamate existing provincial data warehouses of varying datasets and provide the infrastructure to support additional routes of data entry, including clinicians from multiple-disciplines, quality of life and survivorship data from patients, and three dimensional dosimetric information archived from the radiotherapy planning and delivery systems. The primary goal is to be able to capture any data point related to patient characteristics, disease factors, treatment details and survivorship, from the point of diagnosis onwards. Through existing and novel data-mining techniques, OaSIS will support unique population based research activities by promoting collaborative interactions between the research centre, clinical activities at the cancer treatment centres and other institutions. This will also facilitate initiatives to improve patient outcomes, decision support in achieving operational efficiencies and an environment that supports knowledge generation.
PubMed ID
23388263 View in PubMed
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863 records – page 1 of 87.