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Adaptation and evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire and nutrient database for Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165732
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ilona Csizmadi
Lisa Kahle
Ruth Ullman
Ursula Dawe
Thea Palmer Zimmerman
Christine M Friedenreich
Heather Bryant
Amy F Subar
Author Affiliation
Division of Population Health and Information, Alberta Cancer Board, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N2. ilona.csizmadi@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Databases, Factual
Female
Food - classification
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
Despite assumed similarities in Canadian and US dietary habits, some differences in food availability and nutrient fortification exist. Food-frequency questionnaires designed for the USA may therefore not provide the most accurate estimates of dietary intake in Canadian populations. Hence, we undertook to evaluate and modify the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and nutrient database.
Of the foods queried on the DHQ, those most likely to differ in nutrient composition were identified. Where possible these foods were matched to comparable foods in the Canadian Nutrient File. Nutrient values were examined and modified to reflect the Canadian content of minerals (calcium, iron, zinc) and vitamins (A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and B12). DHQs completed by 13 181 Alberta Cohort Study participants aged 35-69 years were analysed to estimate nutrient intakes using the original US and modified versions of the DHQ databases. Misclassification of intake for meeting the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) was determined following analysis with the US nutrient database.
Twenty-five per cent of 2411 foods deemed most likely to differ in nutrient profile were subsequently modified for folate, 11% for vitamin D, 10% for calcium and riboflavin, and between 7 and 10% for the remaining nutrients of interest. Misclassification with respect to meeting the DRI varied but was highest for folate (7%) and vitamin A (7%) among men, and for vitamin D (7%) among women over 50 years of age.
Errors in nutrient intake estimates owing to differences in food fortification between the USA and Canada can be reduced in Canadian populations by using nutrient databases that reflect Canadian fortification practices.
PubMed ID
17212847 View in PubMed
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Alaskan malamute chondrodysplasia. I. Bone composition studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7032
Source
Growth. 1976 Mar;40(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1976
Author
G N Hoag
R G Brown
M E Smart
R E Subden
Source
Growth. 1976 Mar;40(1):3-11
Date
Mar-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Bone and Bones - analysis
Calcification, Physiologic
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Dog Diseases - metabolism
Dogs
Minerals - analysis
Osteochondrodysplasias - etiology - metabolism
Abstract
Chondrodysplastic Alaskan Malamutes exhibit concentrations of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium in radius, ulna, and humerus bone segments similar to those of non-chondrodysplastic dogs of similar age. Significant differences in extractability of mineral components with 5% EDTA were observed in specific bone segments. Although these data suggest that a primary derangement in calcium and phosphorus was possible the magnitude of the differences strongly suggested it unlikely and stress or mechanical factors may account for some of the observed differences. The possibility that chondrodysplasia provides a model for human disorders such as fibrogenesis imperfecta ossium was discussed. These data presented support a previous hypothesis that the chondrodysplasia is not a vitamin D-resistant rickets syndrome.
PubMed ID
1261875 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral content in St. Lawrence Island Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1047
Source
Human Biology. 1984 Feb; 56(1):63-77.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984

Bone mineral content of north Alaskan Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1631
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1974 Sep; 27(9):916-925.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
Mazess, R.B.
Mather, W.
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1974 Sep; 27(9):916-925.
Date
1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Wainwright
Growth and development
Bone core mineral content
Diet, general
Bone mineral loss
Nutrition
Body Height
Body Weight
Direct photon absorptiometry
Sex Factors
Phosphorus
Absorption
Nitrogen
Minerals - analysis
Middle Aged
Male
Inuits
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Aged
Aging
Alaska
Bone and Bones - analysis
Calcium, dietary
European Continental Ancestry Group
Dietary Proteins
Child
Child, Preschool
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 970.
PubMed ID
4412233 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral-osteon analysis of Yupik-Inupiaq skeletons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2463
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 1981 May;55(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
Thompson, D.D.
Gunness-Hey, M.
Author Affiliation
University of Connecticut
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 1981 May;55(1):1-7
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bone core analysis
Bone mineral content
Bone cortical density
Age at death
Osteon
Age Determination by Skeleton
Bone and Bones - analysis - anatomy & histology - cytology
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Femur - cytology
Haversian System - cytology
Humans
Inuits
Male
Minerals - analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Specific Gravity
Abstract
Living adult Eskimos from St. Lawrence Island, North Alaska, and Canada undergo an earlier and more rapid rate of age-related bone mineral loss compared to U.S. whites. Further, it has been shown that Eskimos and Indians differ in patterns of osteon remodeling at the Haversian envelope. Femoral bone cores from adult Eskimos skeletons from St. Lawrence Island (n = 53), Kodiak Island (n = 92), Baffin Island (n = 44), and Southampton Island (n = 69) were analyzed and the results compared with those obtained from cores from U.S. whites (n = 144). Cortical thickness, bone mineral content of cores, cortical bone density, secondary osteon and Haversian canal number and area were quantified for each core. Ages at death were estimated by histological methods and compared with the ages at death estimated by morphological methods for the Eskimo skeletons. Known ages at death were compared with histologically estimated ages at death for the U.S. white series. St. Lawrence Island and Kodiak Island (Yupik speakers) Eskimo cortical thickness values were significantly (P less than .05) greater than Baffin Island and Southampton Island (Inupiaq speakers) Eskimos cortical thickness values but less than the cortical thickness values for U.S. whites. The bone mineral content of the Southampton Eskimos femoral cores was the lowest found in this study. Histological analysis of the femoral bone sections showed that Eskimos contain more osteons per unit area than U.S. whites. No differences in osteon size were noted between the two populations. Differences in patterns of osteon remodeling between Eskimos and whites were inferred. Age at death estimation by histological methods in Eskimos using U.S. white regression equations yielded age estimates in poor agreement with those obtained by morphological methods.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 209.
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Characterization of protein, lipid and mineral contents in common Norwegian seaweeds and evaluation of their potential as food and feed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267633
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2014 Dec;94(15):3281-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Hanne K Maehre
Marian K Malde
Karl-Erik Eilertsen
Edel O Elvevoll
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2014 Dec;94(15):3281-90
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - analysis
Animal Feed
Animals
Arsenic - analysis
Cereals
Fatty Acids - analysis
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - analysis
Food
Fucus - chemistry
Humans
Iodine - analysis
Laminaria - chemistry
Lipids - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Minerals - analysis
Norway
Proteins - analysis
Rhodophyta - chemistry
Seaweed - chemistry
Ulva - chemistry
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to examine protein and amino acid composition, lipid and fatty acid composition, along with a range of essential minerals in common Norwegian seaweed species representing the red (Palmaria palmata and Vertebrata lanosa), green (Cladophora rupestris, Enteromorpha intestinalis and Ulva lactuca) and brown (Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea, Fucus vesiculosus and Pelvetia canaliculata) classes and assess their potential as alternatives to cereals in food and feed. As macroalgae accumulate heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium and mercury were also analyzed.
Proteins ranged from 34 to 123?g?kg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the essential amino acid levels may cover both human and salmonid requirements. Lipids were low (6-58?g?kg(-1) DW), but the red algae had high relative content of long-chained omega-3 fatty acids (32-34 % of the fatty acids). Iodine contents were particularly high in the Laminaria species. Of the heavy metals only arsenic levels may be of concern.
In total, the red alga P. palmata was regarded as the best alternative to cereals in food and feed. For several of the other species, single-component extraction for the ingredients market may be better than using the whole product.
PubMed ID
24700148 View in PubMed
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Chemical profiling of the Arctic sea lettuce Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta) mass-cultivated on land under controlled conditions for food applications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304441
Source
Food Chem. 2021 Mar 30; 341(Pt 1):127999
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-30-2021
Author
Michael Y Roleda
Sandra Lage
Daniel Fonn Aluwini
Céline Rebours
May Bente Brurberg
Udo Nitschke
Francesco G Gentili
Author Affiliation
Department of Algae Production, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), PB 115, NO-1431 Ås, Norway and Kudalsveien 6, 8027 Bodø, Norway; The Marine Science Institute, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman 1101, Quezon City, Philippines. Electronic address: Michael.Roleda@nibio.no.
Source
Food Chem. 2021 Mar 30; 341(Pt 1):127999
Date
Mar-30-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aquaculture
Carbohydrates - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Fatty Acids - analysis
Food Contamination
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Minerals - analysis
Nutritive Value
Plant Proteins, Dietary - analysis
Risk assessment
Seaweed - chemistry - growth & development
Ulva - chemistry - growth & development
Abstract
The increasing use of seaweeds in European cuisine led to cultivation initiatives funded by the European Union. Ulva lactuca, commonly known as sea lettuce, is a fast growing seaweed in the North Atlantic that chefs are bringing into the local cuisine. Here, different strains of Arctic U. lactuca were mass-cultivated under controlled conditions for up to 10 months. We quantified various chemical constituents associated with both health benefits (carbohydrates, protein, fatty acids, minerals) and health risks (heavy metals). Chemical analyses showed that long-term cultivation provided biomass of consistently high food quality and nutritional value. Concentrations of macroelements (C, N, P, Ca, Na, K, Mg) and micronutrients (Fe, Zn, Co, Mn, I) were sufficient to contribute to daily dietary mineral intake. Heavy metals (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) were found at low levels to pose health risk. The nutritional value of Ulva in terms of carbohydrates, protein and fatty acids is comparable to some selected fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains.
Notes
ErratumIn: Food Chem. 2021 Jun 15;347:129059 PMID 33465689
PubMed ID
33099268 View in PubMed
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A comparison of bone mineral results from Denmark and the U.S.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243216
Source
Hum Biol. 1982 May;54(2):343-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1982

Comparison of macro- and micromineral concentrations in the serum and drinking water of healthy children in Southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248517
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1978 Jun;74(3):46-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
A. Helle
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1978 Jun;74(3):46-53
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Minerals - analysis - blood
Trace Elements - analysis - blood
Water Supply - analysis
PubMed ID
714918 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.