Skip header and navigation

Refine By

493 records – page 1 of 50.

A 5-year follow-up study on one-stage implants inserted concomitantly with localized alveolar ridge augmentation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161503
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2007 Oct;34(10):781-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
G. Juodzbalys
A M Raustia
R. Kubilius
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, Lithuania. gintaras@stilusoptimus.lt
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2007 Oct;34(10):781-9
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alveolar Ridge Augmentation - methods
Bone Substitutes - therapeutic use
Collagen - therapeutic use
Dental Implantation, Endosseous - methods
Dental Implants
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Guided Tissue Regeneration, Periodontal - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - therapeutic use
Surgical Wound Dehiscence - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of one-stage implants placed at the time of alveolar bone augmentation using simultaneous guided bone regeneration technique with a collagen barrier membrane in patients suffering from insufficient bone width. Seventeen patients were treated with 20 one-stage OSTEOFIX (Oulu, Finland) implants using simultaneous guided bone regeneration technique. Dehiscence defects were filled by bovine bone mineral Bio-Oss and covered with collagen membrane. Clinical and radiographic parameters of the peri-implant conditions were assessed at the moment of prosthesis placement and at 1- and 5-year follow-ups. Diagnostic dehiscence defect measurements after implant placement showed that the mean vertical defect varied from 3.8 mm to 10.0 mm. At the moment of prosthesis placement and at 1- and 5-year follow-ups all implants were stable, painless and without biological complications. Clinical and radiographic parameters of the peri-implant conditions remained stable during follow-up. The cumulative implant survival rate was 100% after the 5-year observation period and the success rate for all pooled implants was 90%. The present study showed predictable treatment outcomes recorded after 5 years of function for one-stage OSTEOFIX (Oulu, Finland) oral implants placed simultaneously with guided bone regeneration using collagen membrane and deproteinized bovine bone mineral.
PubMed ID
17824891 View in PubMed
Less detail

[10 years experience in the complex treatment of middle-aged and elderly persons at Sochi health resort].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254014
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1974;(1):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

Acidic drinking water and risk of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31416
Source
Diabetes Care. 2002 Sep;25(9):1534-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Lars C Stene
Dag Hongve
Per Magnus
Kjersti S Rønningen
Geir Joner
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Research Center, Aker and Ullevål University Hospitals, Oslo, Norway. lars.christian.stene@fhi.no
Source
Diabetes Care. 2002 Sep;25(9):1534-8
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Water supply
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the associations of acidity and concentration of selected minerals in household tap water with the risk of type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We designed a population-based case-control study with 64 cases of type 1 diabetes and 250 randomly selected control subjects. Acidity, color, and mineral content were measured in tap water from each participant's household. RESULTS: Tap water pH 6.2-6.9 was associated with a fourfold higher risk of type 1 diabetes compared with pH > or =7.7 (OR 3.73, 95% CI 1.52-9.15). This result was similar after exclusion of individuals with the highly protective HLA-DQB1*0602 allele, but adjustment for maternal education, urban/rural residence, sex, and age tended to strengthen the estimated association. Higher tap water concentration of zinc was associated with lower risk of type 1 diabetes after adjustment for pH and other possible confounders, but the overall association was strictly not significant. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the possibility that quality of drinking water influences the risk of type 1 diabetes. The possible mechanisms by which water acidity or mineral content may be involved in the etiology of type 1 diabetes remain unknown, but the mechanisms are most likely indirect and may involve an influence on survival of microorganisms in the water.
PubMed ID
12196423 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation and evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire and nutrient database for Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165732
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ilona Csizmadi
Lisa Kahle
Ruth Ullman
Ursula Dawe
Thea Palmer Zimmerman
Christine M Friedenreich
Heather Bryant
Amy F Subar
Author Affiliation
Division of Population Health and Information, Alberta Cancer Board, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N2. ilona.csizmadi@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Databases, Factual
Female
Food - classification
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
Despite assumed similarities in Canadian and US dietary habits, some differences in food availability and nutrient fortification exist. Food-frequency questionnaires designed for the USA may therefore not provide the most accurate estimates of dietary intake in Canadian populations. Hence, we undertook to evaluate and modify the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and nutrient database.
Of the foods queried on the DHQ, those most likely to differ in nutrient composition were identified. Where possible these foods were matched to comparable foods in the Canadian Nutrient File. Nutrient values were examined and modified to reflect the Canadian content of minerals (calcium, iron, zinc) and vitamins (A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and B12). DHQs completed by 13 181 Alberta Cohort Study participants aged 35-69 years were analysed to estimate nutrient intakes using the original US and modified versions of the DHQ databases. Misclassification of intake for meeting the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) was determined following analysis with the US nutrient database.
Twenty-five per cent of 2411 foods deemed most likely to differ in nutrient profile were subsequently modified for folate, 11% for vitamin D, 10% for calcium and riboflavin, and between 7 and 10% for the remaining nutrients of interest. Misclassification with respect to meeting the DRI varied but was highest for folate (7%) and vitamin A (7%) among men, and for vitamin D (7%) among women over 50 years of age.
Errors in nutrient intake estimates owing to differences in food fortification between the USA and Canada can be reduced in Canadian populations by using nutrient databases that reflect Canadian fortification practices.
PubMed ID
17212847 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161617
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Elaheh Aghdassi
Barbara E Wendland
Melanie Stapleton
Maitreyi Raman
Johane P Allard
Author Affiliation
The University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep;107(9):1575-80
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Canada
Crohn Disease - diet therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Minerals - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of
PubMed ID
17761234 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne fibres in the norwegian silicon carbide industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170564
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2006 Apr;50(3):231-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
A. Skogstad
S. Føreland
E. Bye
W. Eduard
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Hygiene, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. asbjorn.skogstad@stami.no
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2006 Apr;50(3):231-40
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - chemistry - classification
Carbon Compounds, Inorganic - chemistry - classification
Chemical Industry
Chemistry, Physical
Humans
Inhalation Exposure
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Mineral Fibers
Norway
Occupational Exposure
Particle Size
Physicochemical Phenomena
Silicon Compounds - chemistry - classification
Surface Properties
Abstract
Morphology of silicon carbide (SiC) fibres from the Norwegian SiC industry has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fibres are an unwanted side-product in SiC production. They represent a probable cause of the observed increased occurrence of lung diseases among SiC workers. The main aim of this work is to give a detailed description of the morphological variation of the fibres. Furthermore, it is important to study the occurrence of various morphological types with respect to job types and process parameters. SiC fibres accounted for >90% of all fibres observed. Eight categories of SiC fibres are described based on their morphology. The most frequent fibre category had a smooth surface and accounted for more than half of the observed SiC fibres. The diameter distributions of the eight fibre types were significantly different except for two of the categories. More than 99% of the SiC fibres observed were
PubMed ID
16497830 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
U.S. Public Health Service, Anchorage, AK. Publication 999-AH-2. 281 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1967
  1 document  
Author
Heller, C.A.
Scott, E.M.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
U.S. Public Health Service, Anchorage, AK. Publication 999-AH-2. 281 pp.
Date
1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
10562226
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Point Hope
Noatak
Shishmaref
Shungnak
Akiak
Napaskiak
Kasigluk
Hooper Bay
Newtok
Diet, traditional
Infant feeding
Vitamins, general
Minerals
Acculturation
Alaska
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1145.
UAA Alaska E78 A3H4
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 234.
Documents
Less detail

Alaska Native diet and nutrition: an ethnohistorical view.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1764
Source
M.A. thesis. University of Alaska, Fairbanks. 127 pp. University Microfilms International. 1318108.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
1981
Author
Morehouse, K.B.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Source
M.A. thesis. University of Alaska, Fairbanks. 127 pp. University Microfilms International. 1318108.
Date
1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Health status
Diet, traditional
Diet, western
Vitamins, general
Minerals
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1174.
UAA Consortium Library - Alaskana Collection TX361.E8 M6
Less detail

493 records – page 1 of 50.