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Acne and dairy products in adolescence: results from a Norwegian longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286570
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
M. Ulvestad
E. Bjertness
F. Dalgard
J A Halvorsen
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Mar;31(3):530-535
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acne Vulgaris - epidemiology
Adolescent
Animals
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats - analysis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Milk - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Acne is a very common skin condition, and it is of great interest to elucidate lifestyle factors that may contribute to its occurrence. In the last decade, the acne-diet connection has been brought back to credibility.
To examine whether high intakes of dairy products in early adolescence is associated with moderate to severe acne in later adolescence.
The study is a longitudinal, questionnaire-based population study of Norwegian adolescents. Students attending the 10th grade (15-16 years old) of compulsory schooling in Oslo in 2000-2001 and the 13th grade (18-19 years old) 3 years later, in 2004, were invited. Dairy product consumption was self-reported at age 15-16 and acne severity was self-assessed and reported at age 18-19.
The overall prevalence of moderate to severe acne was 13.9%. High intakes (=2 glasses per day) of full-fat dairy products were associated with moderate to severe acne. In boys with exclusively high intakes of full-fat dairy products, the odds ratio for acne was 4.81 (1.59-14.56). A high total intake of dairy products was associated with acne in girls (OR 1.80, 1.02-3.16). No significant associations were found between acne and intake of semi-skimmed or skimmed dairy products, and not with moderate intakes of any fat variety of dairy products.
This study shows association between high intakes of dairy products and acne in adolescence. Our findings support a hypothesis suggesting that dairy consumption may be a factor contributing to acne. The study is based on multiple hypothesis testing, and the methodological limitations must be considered when interpreting the results.
PubMed ID
27422392 View in PubMed
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The acrylamide intake via some common baby food for children in Sweden during their first year of life--an improved method for analysis of acrylamide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29785
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
P. Fohgelberg
J. Rosén
K-E Hellenäs
L. Abramsson-Zetterberg
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Toxicology Division, Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Chromatography, Liquid
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Milk - chemistry
Milk, human - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Sweden
Abstract
The acrylamide levels in breast milk and the main categories of Swedish baby food products, i.e. breast milk substitute (infant formula), gruel, porridge and canned baby food, have been analysed. Furthermore, the acrylamide intake from these products by children up to one year of age has been estimated. Other kind of foods e.g. biscuits, are not included. Because of the expected low concentrations of acrylamide, a new sample extraction method for detection by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, was developed and validated. The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 microg kg(-1) for liquid samples and 2 microg kg(-1) for other samples. The average levels found for gruel, porridge and canned baby food, all ready to eat, were 1.4, 26, and 7.8 microg/kg respectively. We found great variations in the acrylamide levels between and in different food categories,
PubMed ID
15811575 View in PubMed
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Amaltheys: A fluorescence-based analyzer to assess cheese milk denatured whey proteins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273576
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2015 Oct;98(10):6668-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Pierre Lacotte
Franck Gomez
Floriane Bardeau
Sabine Muller
Abdelhaq Acharid
Xavier Quervel
Philippe Trossat
Inès Birlouez-Aragon
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2015 Oct;98(10):6668-77
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cheese - analysis
Denmark
Fluorometry - methods
Food Quality
Milk - chemistry
Whey Proteins - analysis
Abstract
The cheese industry faces many challenges to optimize cheese yield and quality. A very precise standardization of the cheese milk is needed, which is achieved by a fine control of the process and milk composition. Thorough analysis of protein composition is important to determine the amount of protein that will be retained in the curd or lost in the whey. The fluorescence-based Amaltheys analyzer (Spectralys Innovation, Romainville, France) was developed to assess pH 4.6-soluble heat-sensitive whey proteins (sWP*) in 5 min. These proteins are those that can be denatured upon heat-treatment and further retained in the curd after coagulation. Monitoring of sWP* in milk and subsequent adaptation of the process is a reliable solution to achieve stable cheese yield and quality. Performance of the method was evaluated by an accredited laboratory on a 0 to 7 g/L range. Accuracy compared with the reference Kjeldahl method is also provided with a standard error of 0.25 g/L. Finally, a 4-mo industrial trial in a cheese plant is described, where Amaltheys was used as a process analytical technology to monitor sWP* content in ingredients and final cheese milk. Calibration models over quality parameters of final cheese were also built from near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic data. The Amaltheys analyzer was found to be a rapid, compact, and accurate device to help implementation of standardization procedures in the dairy industry.
PubMed ID
26210276 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Norwegian milk and infant formulas for ochratoxin A.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33228
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1999 Feb;16(2):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
M A Skaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Agriculture and Natural Science, Hedmark College, Ridabu, Norway.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1999 Feb;16(2):75-8
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinogens - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Food Contamination
Health Food - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Milk - chemistry
Mycotoxins - analysis
Norway
Ochratoxins - analysis
Abstract
Samples of organic cow's milk, conventional cow's milk, and cow's milk-based infant formulas were analysed for the occurrence of ochratoxin A by means of an HPLC method. The detection limit was 10 ng/l. Ochratoxin A was detected in 6 out of 40 conventional cow's milk samples (range 11-58 ng/l), and in 5 out of 47 organic milk samples (range 15-28 ng/l). No ochratoxin A was detected in any of the 20 infant formula samples. The ochratoxin A levels in cow's milk found in this investigation are sufficient to cause a higher intake of ochratoxin A than the suggested TDI of 5 ng/kg bw/day, e.g. in small children who consume large quantities of milk.
PubMed ID
10435076 View in PubMed
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An update on the vitamin D content of fortified milk from the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219860
Source
N Engl J Med. 1993 Nov 11;329(20):1507
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-11-1993

Applications of sonochemistry in Russian food processing industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268973
Source
Ultrason Sonochem. 2014 Nov;21(6):2112-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Olga Krasulya
Sergey Shestakov
Vladimir Bogush
Irina Potoroko
Pavel Cherepanov
Boris Krasulya
Source
Ultrason Sonochem. 2014 Nov;21(6):2112-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Energy Transfer
Food-Processing Industry - economics - methods
Hydrogen Bonding
Meat
Milk - chemistry
Models, Molecular
Molecular Conformation
Russia
Ultrasonics - economics - methods
Water - chemistry
Abstract
In food industry, conventional methodologies such as grinding, mixing, and heat treatment are used for food processing and preservation. These processes have been well studied for many centuries and used in the conversion of raw food materials to consumable food products. This report is dedicated to the application of a cost-efficient method of energy transfer caused by acoustic cavitation effects in food processing, overall, having significant impacts on the development of relatively new area of food processing such as food sonochemistry.
PubMed ID
24704066 View in PubMed
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Assessment of progesterone profiles and postpartum onset of luteal activity in spring calving Hereford beef suckler cattle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96668
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2010;52:42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Adam D Martin
Marit L Lystad
Olav Reksen
Erik Ropstad
Andres Waldmann
Ola Nafstad
Knut Karlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Production Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway. adam.martin@nvh.no
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2010;52:42
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Birth weight
Breeding
Cattle - physiology
Female
Lactation - physiology
Luteal Phase - physiology
Milk - chemistry
Norway
Parity
Parturition
Pregnancy
Progesterone - analysis - metabolism
Seasons
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Reproduction is the single greatest factor limiting beef cattle production. Previous research on beef suckler luteal activity has largely focused on the mechanisms, and duration, of postpartum anoestrus. However, the temporal pattern of luteal activity after resumption of post-partum ovarian activity, and the impact of pattern type on days open (DO) in purebred beef suckler cows, are unknown. METHODS: Progesterone concentration was measured in milk samples taken thrice weekly from 120 lactations, in 87 animals, on 3 farms, over two years. Onset of luteal activity (OLA) was defined as the first day milk progesterone concentration exceeded 3 ng/ml for two successive measurements, or exceeded 5 ng/ml once. It was defined as delayed if it occurred more than 61 days postpartum. A short initial luteal phase consisted of progesterone concentrations which exceeded 3 ng/ml for fewer than 4 sequential measurements. Temporal progesterone patterns were classified as: 1) Normal cyclicity; 2) Cessation of luteal activity; 3) Prolonged luteal activity; 4) Erratic phase: failure to conform to 1, 2 or 3. Data concerning parity, previous calving interval, breeding values, calf birth and 200-d weight were obtained from the Norwegian Beef Cattle Recording System database. RESULTS: The mean (SD) OLA was 41 d (20). Parity and calf birth weight were inversely correlated with OLA. Delayed OLA occurred in 14.4% of lactations. A short first luteal phase occurred in 61.5% of lactations, but this was unrelated to irregular luteal phase occurrence, pregnancy or DO. Irregular luteal phases occurred in 22% of lactations. The irregularities were: prolonged luteal phase (11%); cessation of luteal activity (5%); erratic luteal activity (6%). Early OLA was associated with prolonged luteal phases. DO was positively correlated with irregular luteal phases and negatively correlated with calf 200-d weight. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that irregular luteal phases negatively affect reproductive performance in purebred beef suckler cattle. A moderate incidence of irregular luteal phases was seen in the study population. Whilst a positive relationship was seen between OLA and DO, unfavourable associations between early OLA and incidence of irregular luteal phases should be considered when developing breeding programmes.
PubMed ID
20550673 View in PubMed
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Atypical progesterone profiles and fertility in Swedish dairy cows.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81859
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2006 Jul;89(7):2529-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Petersson K-J
Gustafsson H.
Strandberg E.
Berglund B.
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Centre for Reproductive Biology in Uppsala, PO Box 7023, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. karl-johan.petersson@hgen.slu.se
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2006 Jul;89(7):2529-38
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Cattle - physiology
Estrous Cycle
Female
Fertility - physiology
Least-Squares Analysis
Milk - chemistry
Ovulation
Parity
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Progesterone - analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of normal and atypical progesterone profiles in Swedish dairy cows was studied. Data were collected from an experimental herd over 15 yr, and included 1,049 postpartum periods from 183 Swedish Holstein and 326 Swedish Red and White dairy cows. Milk progesterone samples were taken twice weekly until initiation of cyclical ovarian activity and less frequently thereafter. Progesterone profiles were 1) normal profile: first rise in milk progesterone above the threshold value before d 56 postpartum, followed by regular cyclical ovarian activity (70.4%); 2) delayed onset of cyclical ovarian activity: low milk progesterone the first 56 d postpartum (15.6%); 3) cessation of cyclical ovarian activity: ovarian activity resumed within 56 d postpartum, but ceased for a period of 14 d or more (6.6%); and 4) prolonged luteal phase: ovarian activity resumed within 56 d postpartum, but milk progesterone remained elevated in the nonpregnant cow for a period of 20 d or more (7.3%). Swedish Holsteins had 1.5 times higher risk of atypical profile than Swedish Red and Whites. Risk of atypical profiles was 0.5 and 0.7 times lower for older cows compared with first-parity cows; 2.3 times higher for cows in tie-stalls compared with those in loose housing; 2.6 times higher for cows calving during winter compared with summer; 0.5 times lower for cows in earlier (1994-1999) calving-year groups compared with the most recent (2000-2002); 2.5 times higher for cows with planned extended calving interval compared with conventional calving interval; and 2.2 times higher for an atypical profile in previous lactation compared with a normal profile. Cows with atypical profiles had a 15-d increase in interval from calving to first artificial insemination and an 18-d increase in interval from calving to conception. Progesterone samples taken within the first 60 d postpartum were used to calculate the percentage of samples above the threshold value of luteal activity. This measure had a significantly different mean in profiles and can be used to separate delayed onset of cyclical ovarian activity profiles and prolonged luteal phase profiles from normal. Thereby, it may be a more effective tool than measurements based only on the onset of ovarian cyclical activity in genetic evaluation of early postpartum fertility in dairy cows.
PubMed ID
16772571 View in PubMed
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Bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl acids in dairy cows in a naturally contaminated environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114143
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Nov;20(11):7959-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Robin Vestergren
Francis Orata
Urs Berger
Ian T Cousins
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden, robin.vestergren@itm.su.se.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Nov;20(11):7959-69
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cattle
Diet
Drinking Water - chemistry
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Female
Fluorocarbons - analysis - metabolism
Food chain
Humans
Meat - analysis
Milk - chemistry - metabolism
Silage - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Beef and dairy products may be important vectors of human exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), but the understanding of how PFAAs are accumulated and transferred through agricultural food chains is very limited. Here, the bioaccumulation of PFAAs in dairy cows receiving naturally contaminated feed and drinking water was investigated by conducting a mass balance of PFAAs for a herd of dairy cows in a barn on a typical Swedish dairy farm. It was assumed that the cows were able to reach steady state with their dietary intake of PFAAs. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with 8 to 12 carbons were detected in cow tissue samples (liver, muscle, and blood) at concentrations up to 130 ng kg(-1). Mass balance calculations demonstrated an agreement between total intake and excretion within a factor of 1.5 and consumption of silage was identified as the dominant intake pathway for all PFAAs. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) were highly tissue and homologue specific. While BMFs of PFOS and PFCAs with 9 and 10 fluorinated carbons in liver ranged from 10 to 20, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was not biomagnified (BMF
PubMed ID
23644948 View in PubMed
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Bioavailability of selenium from bovine milk as assessed in subjects with ileostomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61573
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Feb;58(2):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
J. Chen
H. Lindmark-Månsson
M. Drevelius
P. Tidehag
G. Hallmans
E. Hertervig
A. Nilsson
B. Akesson
Author Affiliation
Biomedical Nutrition, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Feb;58(2):350-5
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Biological Availability
Comparative Study
Cultured Milk Products - metabolism
Diet
Dietary Fats
Female
Humans
Ileostomy
Intestinal Absorption
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - chemistry - metabolism
Pilot Projects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Selenium - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the absorption of dietary selenium in humans, especially of milk selenium. DESIGN:: 1-day meal studies in subjects with ileostomy. SETTING: Hospital outpatient clinics. SUBJECTS: Three subjects in the pilot study and nine subjects in the main study (eight men/ four women). INTERVENTION: Different beverages, 1 l/day, were given in addition to basal diets (soft drink, 1 week; low-fat milk, 3 weeks; fermented low-fat milk, 3 weeks and soft drink, 1 week). Ileostomy effluents were collected during the last 2 days in each of the four periods. RESULTS: On days when the subjects were given 1 l of low-fat milk, the estimated fractional absorption of total dietary selenium was 65.5 (2.3)% (mean (s.d.), n=18), which was similar to the value when fermented low-fat milk was given (64.1 (3.2)%). However, both the calculated amount of milk selenium absorbed (10.9 (2.4) vs 9.4 (1.7) microg selenium) and its fractional absorption (73.3 (16.1) vs 64.1 (11.2)%, n=18) were significantly higher for milk than for fermented milk. CONCLUSIONS: Selenium from milk and other sources is well absorbed in subjects with ileostomy. The real absorption may be even higher than the values shown.
PubMed ID
14749757 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 1 of 11.