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Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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Blue-green color and composition of Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri) milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4632
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol B. 1984;79(3):349-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
D E Ullrey
C C Schwartz
P A Whetter
T. Rajeshwar Rao
J R Euber
S G Cheng
J R Brunner
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol B. 1984;79(3):349-52
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Calcium - analysis
Cetacea - metabolism
Color
Comparative Study
Female
Lactation
Lipids - analysis
Milk - analysis
Milk Proteins - analysis
Phosphates - analysis
Potassium - analysis
Pregnancy
Sodium - analysis
Species Specificity
Whales - metabolism
Abstract
Two hundred ml of milk were obtained from a lactating Stejneger's beaked whale stranded at Ninilchik, Alaska on 21 Oct, 1980. Total solids (41%) were similar to values reported for sperm and belukha whales, while fat (17%) was half as great and crude protein (17%) was 2-4 times greater than in milk of these species. Lactose was not detected. Calcium (0.22%) was greater than reported for pigmy sperm whales but less than for blue whales. Phosphorus (0.07%) was less than for any of the above species. Sodium and potassium concentrations were 0.13% and 0.11%, respectively. Values (microgram/g) for other elements analyzed (magnesium, 42; iron, 35; copper, 2.6; zinc, 1.5; manganese, 0.3; selenium, 0.36) have not been reported for whale milk. Based on SDS-gel electropherograms, this whale milk did not contain a whey protein corresponding to cattle milk alpha-lactalbumin. A blue-green pigment in the milk was identified as biliverdin.
PubMed ID
6509923 View in PubMed
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Caesium and iodine metabolism in lactating cows under chronic administration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65291
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1989 Sep;85:253-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
F. Daburon
G. Fayart
Y. Tricaud
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Radiobiologie Appliquée, C.E.A., Gif S/Yvette, France.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1989 Sep;85:253-61
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Animals
Cattle - metabolism
Cesium Radioisotopes - metabolism
Female
Iodine Radioisotopes - metabolism
Lactation - metabolism
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Muscles - analysis
Nuclear Reactors
Organ Specificity
Pregnancy
Radioactive fallout
Sodium Iodide - metabolism
Ukraine
Abstract
1) Two Jersey cows were fed during 90 days with contaminated hay harvested in the South-East of France and containing about 5500 Bq/kg of dry matter (134 Cs + 137 Cs). A plateau was observed in milk 15 days and in meat 50-60 days after the beginning of the contamination. The transfer coefficients were at that time 1.1% for the milk and 2-2.7% for the meat. A calf was fed from the 8th day after birth until the 80th day solely with the contaminated milk from the two cows. At that time and weighing 130 kg it retained more than 40% of the ingested caesium. From the 44th till the 80th day the daily intake of milk was constant: in these conditions the transfer coefficient to meat was 16%. 2) Transfer coefficients to milk and thyroid were determinated in three Friesian cows contaminated daily with Na131I in pellets, one month before and two months after calving; one more lactating cow was contaminated for one month, 5 months after calving. The parturition provokes a fall of about 40% in the thyroid burden of the cows followed by a return near the initial equilibrium level (2-3 times the daily uptake in summer and 1 time in winter). At birth the ratio between the specific radioactivity of the calf thyroid and the cow thyroid was about 3. Transfer coefficients in milk at the equilibrium (one month after calving) were 0.35-0.50% in summer and 0.75-1.25 in winter.
PubMed ID
2814453 View in PubMed
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Challenges for bovine viral diarrhoea virus antibody detection in bulk milk by antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays due to changes in milk production levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276838
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Jun 23;57:32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-23-2015
Author
Alessandro Foddai
Claes Enøe
Anders Stockmarr
Kaspar Krogh
Åse Uttenthal
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Jun 23;57:32
Date
Jun-23-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Antibodies, Viral - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Cattle - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Dairying - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Denmark - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Diarrhea Viruses, Bovine Viral - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Female - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Milk - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Prevalence - analysis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology - methods - epidemiology - isolation & purification - veterinary - secretion - virology
Abstract
Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is considered eradicated from Denmark. Currently, very few (if any) Danish cattle herds could be infected with BVD virus (BVDV). The Danish antibody blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been successfully used during the Danish BVD eradication program, initiated in 1994. During the last decade, the cattle herd size has increased while the prevalence of BVDV has decreased. In this study, we investigated how these changes could affect the performance of the Danish blocking ELISA and of the SVANOVIR? BVDV-Ab indirect ELISA. The latter has successfully been used to eradicate BVD in Sweden. Data (2003-2010) on changes in median herd size and milk production levels, occurrence of viremic animals and bulk milk surveillance were analysed. Additionally, the Danish blocking ELISA and the SVANOVIR ELISA were compared analyzing milk and serum samples. The prevalence of antibody positive milking cows that could be detected by each test was estimated, by diluting positive individual milk samples and making artificial milk pools.
During the study period, the median herd size increased from 74 (2003) to 127 cows (2010), while the prevalence of BVDV infected herds decreased from 0.51 to 0.02 %. The daily milk yield contribution of a single seropositive cow to the entire daily bulk milk was reduced from 1.61 % in 2003 to 0.95 % in 2010 due to the increased herd size. It was observed that antibody levels in bulk milk decreased at national level. Moreover, we found that when testing bulk milk, the SVANOVIR? BVDV-Ab can detect a lower prevalence of seropositive lactating cows, compared to the Danish blocking ELISA (0.78 % vs. 50 %). Values in the SVANOVIR? BVDV-Ab better relate to low concentrations of antibody positive milk (R(2)?=?94-98 %), than values in the blocking ELISA (R(2)?=?23-75 %). For sera, the two ELISAs performed equally well.
The SVANOVIR ELISA is recommended for analysis of bulk milk samples in the current Danish situation, since infected dairy herds e.g. due to import of infected cattle can be detected shortly after BVDV introduction, when only few lactating cows have seroconverted. In sera, the two ELISAs can be used interchangeably.
Notes
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2000 Nov 15;77(1-2):137-4311042407
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2001 Apr 2;79(3):193-20811240099
Cites: Prev Vet Med. 2001 Oct 11;51(3-4):199-21411535280
Cites: Res Vet Sci. 2002 Feb;72(1):75-8212002642
Cites: Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1987 Jul;34(5):356-632825449
Cites: J Dairy Sci. 1988 Aug;71(8):2035-433170863
Cites: Zentralbl Veterinarmed B. 1989 Mar;36(2):113-82546339
Cites: Vet Rec. 1993 Oct 2;133(14):341-48236677
Cites: J Vet Diagn Invest. 1995 Jul;7(3):327-327578446
Cites: Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract. 1995 Nov;11(3):627-408581867
Cites: Arch Virol Suppl. 1991;3:245-519210948
Cites: Rev Sci Tech. 1998 Aug;17(2):550-619713894
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 1999 Jan;64(2-3):89-10710028165
Cites: APMIS. 2005 Jul-Aug;113(7-8):536-4116086824
PubMed ID
26099792 View in PubMed
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Chemical composition of milk from a herd of Norwegian goats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65543
Source
J Dairy Res. 1986 May;53(2):211-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
J. Brendehaug
R K Abrahamsen
Source
J Dairy Res. 1986 May;53(2):211-21
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Citrates - analysis
Comparative Study
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Goats
Humans
Lactation
Lipids - analysis
Milk - analysis
Milk Proteins - analysis
Nitrogen - analysis
Norway
Pregnancy
Salts - analysis
Taste
Triglycerides - analysis
Abstract
The chemical composition of Norwegian bulk collected goats' milk from the University herd was analysed during one lactation period (30 weeks, 20 samples during 1983). There was considerable variation in chemical composition during the year. Fat content decreased over the first 4 months of lactation and increased during the mountain pasture period. Protein concentration decreased during the first 4 months, and then increased until the end of lactation. Lactose concentration decreased throughout lactation. Casein nitrogen (casein N) was highest at mid lactation and lowest at the beginning and end of lactation. beta-Lactoglobulin N showed the opposite trend. Citrate content showed a significantly quadratic decrease and total ash content an increase with advancing lactation. Mutual significant correlations between total P, K, Na, Ca and Mg were calculated, and all increased throughout lactation. There was significant positive correlation between concentrations of individual medium-chain fatty acids and stage of lactation. They remained more or less constant during the first part of the lactation, decreased to minima when the goats were on pasture, and increased during the last phase of lactation. Concentration of C16 fatty acid was negatively correlated with C18 and C18:1. Goat flavour intensity score and quality flavour score were highest at mid lactation, and positively correlated with the acid degree value.
PubMed ID
3755147 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl--the radiological impact on Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233454
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 1988 Mar;39(1):37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
W. Huda
A M Sourkes
B L Tracy
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Physics, Manitoba Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 1988 Mar;39(1):37-41
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Animals
Canada
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis
Milk - analysis
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Rain
Ruthenium Radioisotopes - analysis
Ukraine
Abstract
On 26 April 1986, an accident at a Ukrainian nuclear reactor at Chernobyl triggered the release of large quantities of fission products into the atmosphere. After 7 May 1986 measurable quantities of ruthenium-103, iodine-131, cesium-134, and cesium-137 were detected in environmental sampling carried out in all regions of Canada. Maximum airborne concentrations for each radionuclide were of the order of a few mBq.m-3 and contaminated milk samples on average contained less than 1Bq.L-1 of iodine-131 and cesium-137. The mean value of the effective dose equivalent for an adult Canadian in the two months following the accident is calculated to be 0.28 microSv. As this total radiation dose is about 10(-33) of the dose from natural background during the same period, the resultant radiological detriment is concluded to be negligible.
PubMed ID
2966167 View in PubMed
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The content of 90Sr in the bone tissue of the population of the Soviet Union. (1959-1971) (The basic laws of its accumulation and distribution).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251491
Source
J Hyg Epidemiol Microbiol Immunol. 1976;21(3):257-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
A N Marei
B K Borisov
E V Petukhova
Source
J Hyg Epidemiol Microbiol Immunol. 1976;21(3):257-65
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Bone and Bones - analysis - metabolism
Bread - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Environmental pollution
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Milk - analysis
Moscow
New York
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Spine - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - metabolism
USSR
Urban Population
Abstract
On the basis of the results of long-term observations, general laws have been identified determining the dynamics of 90Sr concentration in the bone tissue of the population of the USSR in 1959-71, the peculiarities of 90Sr accumulation in different age groups and the connection and dependences between the intake and the contect of the isotope in human organism. It has been found that maximum 90Sr concentration occur in children born in the year when nuclear tests were carried out. The type of distribution of the frequency of occurrence of cases showing different levels of 90Sr content in uniform population groups was determined. Characteristic features of 90Sr distribution in different bones of the skeleton and its changes in the course of time were demonstrated.
PubMed ID
1036498 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.