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Assessment of pre- and postnatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls: lessons from the Inuit Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4473
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Centre, Québec, Québec, Canada. pierre.ayotte@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Breast Feeding
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Forecasting
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Milk, human - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are food-chain contaminants that have been shown to induce adverse developmental effects in humans. In the course of an epidemiologic study established to investigate neurodevelopmental deficits induced by environmental PCB exposure in the Inuit population of northern Québec (Nunavik, Canada), we compared three biomarkers of prenatal exposure and models to predict PCB plasma concentration at 6 months postpartum. Concentrations of 14 PCB congeners were measured by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection in lipids extracted from maternal plasma, cord plasma, breast milk (collected at approximately 1 month postpartum), and 6-month-old infant plasma samples. Similar congener profiles were observed in all biologic samples, and PCB-153, the most abundant and persistent PCB congener, was strongly correlated with other frequently detected PCB congeners in all biologic media. When expressed on a lipid basis, maternal plasma, cord plasma, and milk concentrations of this congener were strongly intercorrelated, indicating that PCB concentration in any of these biologic media is a good indicator of prenatal exposure to PCBs. A multivariate model that included maternal PCB-153 plasma lipid concentration, breast-feeding duration, and the sum of two skin-fold thicknesses (an index of infant body fat mass) explained 72% of PCB-153 plasma concentration variance at 6 months postpartum (p
PubMed ID
12842782 View in PubMed
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Comparison of polychlorinated biphenyl levels across studies of human neurodevelopment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49183
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Matthew P Longnecker
Mary S Wolff
Beth C Gladen
John W Brock
Philippe Grandjean
Joseph L Jacobson
Susan A Korrick
Walter J Rogan
Nynke Weisglas-Kuperus
Irva Hertz-Picciotto
Pierre Ayotte
Paul Stewart
Gerhard Winneke
M Judith Charles
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
E Rudy Boersma
Larisa M Altshul
Birger Heinzow
James J Pagano
Allan A Jensen
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. longnecker@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):65-70
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, Gas - methods
Comparative Study
Environmental pollutants - blood
Europe
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Milk, Human - chemistry - drug effects
Nervous System - drug effects - embryology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent pollutants that are ubiquitous in the food chain, and detectable amounts are in the blood of almost every person in most populations that have been examined. Extensive evidence from animal studies shows that PCBs are neurotoxins, even at low doses. Interpretation of human data regarding low-level, early-life PCB exposure and subsequent neurodevelopment is problematic because levels of exposure were not similarly quantified across studies. We expressed the exposure levels from 10 studies of PCB and neurodevelopment in a uniform manner using a combination of data from original investigators, laboratory reanalyses, calculations based on published data, and expert opinion. The mainstay of our comparison was the median level of PCB 153 in maternal pregnancy serum. The median concentration of PCB 153 in the 10 studies ranged from 30 to 450 ng/g serum lipid, and the median of the 10 medians was 110 ng/g. We found that (a)) the distribution of PCB 153 exposure in most studies overlapped substantially, (b)) exposure levels in the Faroe Islands study were about 3-4-fold higher than in most other studies, and (c)) the exposure levels in the two recent U.S. studies were about one-third of those in the four earlier U.S. studies or recent Dutch, German, and northern Qu?bec studies. Our results will facilitate a direct comparison of the findings on PCBs and neurodevelopment when they are published for all 10 studies.
PubMed ID
12515680 View in PubMed
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Urinary and breast milk biomarkers to assess exposure to naphthalene in pregnant women: an investigation of personal and indoor air sources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257184
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13(1):30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Amanda J Wheeler
Nina A Dobbin
Marie-Eve Héroux
Mandy Fisher
Liu Sun
Cheryl F Khoury
Russ Hauser
Mark Walker
Tim Ramsay
Jean-François Bienvenu
Alain LeBlanc
Eric Daigle
Eric Gaudreau
Patrick Belanger
Mark Feeley
Pierre Ayotte
Tye E Arbuckle
Author Affiliation
Water and Air Quality Bureau, HECSB, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, AL 4903C, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada. A.Wheeler@ecu.edu.au.
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13(1):30
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Biological Markers - analysis - urine
Environmental monitoring
Female
Housing
Humans
Maternal Exposure
Milk, human - chemistry
Naphthalenes - analysis
Naphthols - urine
Ontario
Pregnancy - urine
Abstract
Naphthalene exposures for most non-occupationally exposed individuals occur primarily indoors at home. Residential indoor sources include pest control products (specifically moth balls), incomplete combustion such as cigarette smoke, woodstoves and cooking, some consumer and building products, and emissions from gasoline sources found in attached garages. The study aim was to assess naphthalene exposure in pregnant women from Canada, using air measurements and biomarkers of exposure.
Pregnant women residing in Ottawa, Ontario completed personal and indoor air sampling, and questionnaires. During pregnancy, pooled urine voids were collected over two 24-hour periods on a weekday and a weekend day. At 2-3 months post-birth, they provided a spot urine sample and a breast milk sample following the 24-hour air monitoring. Urines were analyzed for 1-naphthol and 2-naphthol and breast milk for naphthalene. Simple linear regression models examined associations between known naphthalene sources, air and biomarker samples.
Study recruitment rate was 11.2% resulting in 80 eligible women being included. Weekday and weekend samples were highly correlated for both personal (r?=?0.83, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24767676 View in PubMed
Less detail