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Concentration of mercury, cadmium, and lead in breast milk from Norwegian mothers: Association with dietary habits, amalgam and other factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302118
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Aug 10; 677:466-473
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-10-2019
Author
Marie Vollset
Nina Iszatt
Øyvind Enger
Elin Lovise Folven Gjengedal
Merete Eggesbø
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Aas, Norway. Electronic address: marie.vollset@nmbu.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Aug 10; 677:466-473
Date
Aug-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cadmium - metabolism
Dental Amalgam - analysis
Diet
Environmental Pollutants - metabolism
Female
Humans
Lead - metabolism
Mercury - metabolism
Milk, human - chemistry
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Young Adult
Abstract
Mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) are of great concern for food safety and infants are especially sensitive to exposure to the maternal body burden. We quantified these elements in breast milk from Norwegian mothers and determined their association with dietary habits, maternal amalgam fillings, and smoking. Breast milk (n?=?300) from the Norwegian Human Milk Study (HUMIS) was analyzed using triple quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, after an acidic decomposition using microwave technique. We used multiple linear regression to examine predictors of Hg and Cd in breast milk, and logistic regression to test predictors of Pb above the quantification limit. The median breast milk concentrations (minimum - maximum) were 0.20?µg Hg/kg (
PubMed ID
31063889 View in PubMed
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Environmental toxicants in breast milk of Norwegian mothers and gut bacteria composition and metabolites in their infants at 1 month.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300900
Source
Microbiome. 2019 02 27; 7(1):34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-27-2019
Author
Nina Iszatt
Stefan Janssen
Virissa Lenters
Cecilie Dahl
Hein Stigum
Rob Knight
Siddhartha Mandal
Shyamal Peddada
Antonio González
Tore Midtvedt
Merete Eggesbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 222, Skøyen, 0213, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Microbiome. 2019 02 27; 7(1):34
Date
02-27-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bacteria - classification - drug effects - genetics
Biodiversity
Cohort Studies
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - genetics
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Fatty Acids, Volatile - analysis
Feces - chemistry - microbiology
Flame Retardants - adverse effects - analysis
Gastrointestinal Microbiome - drug effects
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - adverse effects - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Metabolomics
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Pesticides - adverse effects - analysis
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects - analysis
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Abstract
Early disruption of the microbial community may influence life-long health. Environmental toxicants can contaminate breast milk and the developing infant gut microbiome is directly exposed. We investigated whether environmental toxicants in breastmilk affect the composition and function of the infant gut microbiome at 1 month. We measured environmental toxicants in breastmilk, fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and gut microbial composition from 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using samples from 267 mother-child pairs in the Norwegian Microbiota Cohort (NoMIC). We tested 28 chemical exposures: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated flame retardants (PBDEs), per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), and organochlorine pesticides. We assessed chemical exposure and alpha diversity/SCFAs using elastic net regression modeling and generalized linear models, adjusting for confounders, and variation in beta diversity (UniFrac), taxa abundance (ANCOM), and predicted metagenomes (PiCRUSt) in low, medium, and high exposed groups.
PBDE-28 and the surfactant perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) were associated with less microbiome diversity. Some sub-OTUs of Lactobacillus, an important genus in early life, were lower in abundance in samples from infants with relative "high" (>?80th percentile) vs. "low" (
PubMed ID
30813950 View in PubMed
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Novel application of statistical methods for analysis of multiple toxicants identifies DDT as a risk factor for early child behavioral problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282277
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Nov;151:91-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Joan Forns
Siddhartha Mandal
Nina Iszatt
Anuschka Polder
Cathrine Thomsen
Jan Ludvig Lyche
Hein Stigum
Roel Vermeulen
Merete Eggesbø
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Nov;151:91-100
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Child, Preschool
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Problem behavior
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the association between postnatal exposure to multiple persistent organic pollutants (POPs) measured in breast milk samples and early behavioral problems using statistical methods to deal with correlated exposure data.
We used data from the Norwegian HUMIS study. We measured concentrations of 24 different POPs in human milk from 612 mothers (median collection time: 32 days after delivery), including 13 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners, 6 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) congeners and five organochlorine compounds. We assessed child behavioral problems at 12 and 24 months using the infant toddler symptom checklist (ITSC). Higher score in ITSC corresponds to more behavioral problems. First we performed principal component analysis (PCA). Then two variable selection methods, elastic net (ENET) and Bayesian model averaging (BMA), were applied to select any toxicants associated with behavioral problems. Finally, the effect size of the selected toxicants was estimated using multivariate linear regression analyses.
p,p'-DDT was associated with behavioral problems at 12 months in all the applied models. Specifically, the principal component composed of organochlorine pesticides was significantly associated with behavioral problems and both ENET and BMA identified p,p'-DDT as associated with behavioral problems. Using a multiple linear regression model an interquartile increase in p,p'-DDT was associated with a 0.62 unit increase in ITSC score (95% CI 0.45, 0.79) at 12 months, corresponding to more behavioral problems. The association was modified by maternal education: the effect of p,p'-DDT was strongest in women with lower education (ß=0.59; 95%CI: 0.38, 0.81) compared to the mother with higher education (ß=0.14; 95%CI: -0.05, 0.34) (p-value for interaction=0.089). At 24 months, neither selection method consistently identified any toxicant associated with behavioral problems.
Within a mixture of 24 toxicants measured in breast milk, p,p'-DDT was the single toxicant associated with behavioral problems at 12 months using different methods for handling numerous correlated exposures.
PubMed ID
27466755 View in PubMed
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A novel model to characterize postnatal exposure to lipophilic environmental toxicants and application in the study of hexachlorobenzene and infant growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273903
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Dec;85:156-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Hein Stigum
Nina Iszatt
Anuschka Polder
Siddhartha Mandal
Merete Eggesbø
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Dec;85:156-62
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Female
Hazardous Substances - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Hexachlorobenzene - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Exposure
Milk, human - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Weight Gain - drug effects
Abstract
Infants are exposed to persistent environmental contaminants through breast milk, yet studies assessing the health effects of postnatal exposure are lacking. Existing postnatal exposure assessment is either too simple (lactation exposure model, LEM) or requires complex physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models.
We present equations for postnatal exposure calculations. We applied these equations to study the effect of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on infant growth in the two first years of life.
HCB was measured in breast milk samples in 449 mother-child pairs participating in the Norwegian birth cohort study HUMIS. We used these concentrations, mother's weight, height and age, together with child's weight at 8 age points, and proportion of milk consumed each month, to calculate HCB concentrations in the infant over age. We then estimated the association between HCB and infant growth using a linear mixed model.
Children exposed to HCB via mother's milk reached concentrations 1-5 times higher than the mother. HCB was associated with lower weight gain in the first 2years (-33g per unit HCB and month, 95% CI: -38, -27 at 6months). Associations were stronger during the first 3months (-57g per unit HCB and month, 95% CI: -67, -49 at 1month), indicating a critical window of effect. Our equations gave more precise estimates than the LEM.
Our equations for postnatal exposure of lipophilic environmental toxicants give better results than the LEM and are easier to implement than the complex PBPK models. HCB exposure, especially during the first three months of life, has a negative effect on infant growth up to 2years.
PubMed ID
26398043 View in PubMed
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Persistent Environmental Toxicants in Breast Milk and Rapid Infant Growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289484
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Rachel Criswell
Virissa Lenters
Siddhartha Mandal
Hein Stigum
Nina Iszatt
Merete Eggesbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Birth weight
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Metals, Heavy - analysis - toxicity
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Pesticides - analysis - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - physiopathology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - physiopathology
Abstract
Many environmental toxicants are passed to infants in utero and through breast milk. Exposure to toxicants during the perinatal period can alter growth patterns, impairing growth or increasing obesity risk. Previous studies have focused on only a few toxicants at a time, which may confound results. We investigated levels of 26 toxicants in breast milk and their associations with rapid infant growth, a risk factor for later obesity.
We used data from the Norwegian HUMIS study, a multi-center cohort of 2,606 mothers and newborns enrolled between 2002 and 2008. Milk samples collected 1 month after delivery from a subset of 789 women oversampled by overweight were analyzed for toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals, and pesticides. Growth was defined as change in weight-for-age z-score between 0 and 6 months among the HUMIS population, and rapid growth was defined as change in z-score above 0.67. We used a Bayesian variable selection method to determine the exposures that most explained variation in the outcome. Identified toxicants were included in logistic and linear regression models to estimate associations with growth, adjusting for maternal age, smoking, education, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, child sex, cumulative breastfeeding, birth weight, gestational age, and preterm status.
Of 789 infants, 19.2% displayed rapid growth. The median maternal age was 29.6 years, and the median pre-pregnancy BMI was 24.0 kg/m2, with 45.3% of mothers overweight or obese. Rapid growers were more likely to be firstborn. Hexachlorobenzene, ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (ß-HCH), and PCB-74 were identified in the variable selection method. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in ß-HCH exposure was associated with a lower odds of rapid growth (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.94). Newborns exposed to high levels of ß-HCH showed reduced infant growth (ß = -0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.01 for IQR increase in breast milk concentration). No other significant associations were found.
Our results suggest that early life ß-HCH exposure may be linked to slowed growth. Further research is warranted on the potential mechanism behind this association and the longer-term metabolic effects of perinatal ß-HCH exposure.
PubMed ID
28301833 View in PubMed
Less detail

Persistent Environmental Toxicants in Breast Milk and Rapid Infant Growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289642
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Rachel Criswell
Virissa Lenters
Siddhartha Mandal
Hein Stigum
Nina Iszatt
Merete Eggesbø
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2017; 70(3):210-216
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Birth weight
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Metals, Heavy - analysis - toxicity
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Pesticides - analysis - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - physiopathology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - physiopathology
Abstract
Many environmental toxicants are passed to infants in utero and through breast milk. Exposure to toxicants during the perinatal period can alter growth patterns, impairing growth or increasing obesity risk. Previous studies have focused on only a few toxicants at a time, which may confound results. We investigated levels of 26 toxicants in breast milk and their associations with rapid infant growth, a risk factor for later obesity.
We used data from the Norwegian HUMIS study, a multi-center cohort of 2,606 mothers and newborns enrolled between 2002 and 2008. Milk samples collected 1 month after delivery from a subset of 789 women oversampled by overweight were analyzed for toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals, and pesticides. Growth was defined as change in weight-for-age z-score between 0 and 6 months among the HUMIS population, and rapid growth was defined as change in z-score above 0.67. We used a Bayesian variable selection method to determine the exposures that most explained variation in the outcome. Identified toxicants were included in logistic and linear regression models to estimate associations with growth, adjusting for maternal age, smoking, education, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, parity, child sex, cumulative breastfeeding, birth weight, gestational age, and preterm status.
Of 789 infants, 19.2% displayed rapid growth. The median maternal age was 29.6 years, and the median pre-pregnancy BMI was 24.0 kg/m2, with 45.3% of mothers overweight or obese. Rapid growers were more likely to be firstborn. Hexachlorobenzene, ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (ß-HCH), and PCB-74 were identified in the variable selection method. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in ß-HCH exposure was associated with a lower odds of rapid growth (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.94). Newborns exposed to high levels of ß-HCH showed reduced infant growth (ß = -0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.01 for IQR increase in breast milk concentration). No other significant associations were found.
Our results suggest that early life ß-HCH exposure may be linked to slowed growth. Further research is warranted on the potential mechanism behind this association and the longer-term metabolic effects of perinatal ß-HCH exposure.
PubMed ID
28301833 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.