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Lead and cadmium levels in human milk and blood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67713
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Apr 21;166:149-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-1995
Author
I P Hallén
L. Jorhem
B J Lagerkvist
A. Oskarsson
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Division Swedish National Food Administration, Uppsala.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Apr 21;166:149-55
Date
Apr-21-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Cadmium - blood - pharmacokinetics
Chemical Industry
Environmental Pollutants - blood - pharmacokinetics
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lactation
Lead - blood - pharmacokinetics
Milk, human - chemistry
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - metabolism
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Sweden
Abstract
Lead and cadmium levels were determined (with AAS) in blood and milk obtained at 6 weeks after delivery from women living in the vicinity of a copper and lead metal smelter and in a control area. Analysis of lead and cadmium were also performed in blood samples obtained at delivery. Accuracy of the analysis was confirmed by the analysis of quality control samples. In general, blood and milk levels of lead and cadmium were low in both areas. At 6 weeks after delivery the lead levels in blood and milk were 32 +/- 8 and 0.7 +/- 0.4 micrograms Pb/l, respectively (total mean +/- S.D., n = 75). Cadmium levels in blood and milk were 0.9 +/- 0.3 and 0.06 +/- 0.04 microgram Cd/l, respectively (n = 75). At delivery the lead levels in blood of women in the smelter area were higher, 38.7 micrograms Pb/l, than the blood lead levels in women from the control area, 32.3 micrograms Pb/l, (P
PubMed ID
7754354 View in PubMed
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Total and inorganic mercury in breast milk in relation to fish consumption and amalgam in lactating women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72899
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1996 May-Jun;51(3):234-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Oskarsson
A. Schültz
S. Skerfving
I P Hallén
B. Ohlin
B J Lagerkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1996 May-Jun;51(3):234-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Dental Amalgam
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Lactation
Mercury - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics
Milk, human - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Total mercury concentrations (mean +/- standard deviation) in breast milk, blood, and hair samples collected 6 wk after delivery from 30 women who lived in the north of Sweden were 0.6 +/- 0.4 ng/g (3.0 +/- 2.0 nmol/kg), 2.3 +/- 1.0 ng/g (11.5 +/- 5.0 nmol/kg), and 0.28 +/- 0.16 microg/g (1.40 +/- 0.80 micromol/kg), respectively. In milk, an average of 51% of total mercury was in the form of inorganic mercury, whereas in blood an average of only 26% was present in the inorganic form. Total and inorganic mercury levels in blood (r = .55, p = .003; and r = .46, p = .01 6; respectively) and milk (r = .47, p = .01; and r = .45, p = .018; respectively) were correlated with the number of amalgam fillings. The concentrations of total mercury and organic mercury (calculated by subtraction of inorganic mercury from total mercury) in blood (r = .59, p = .0006, and r = .56, p = .001; respectively) and total mercury in hair (r = .52, p = .006) were correlated with the estimated recent exposure to methylmercury via intake of fish. There was no significant between the milk levels of mercury in any chemical form and the estimated methylmercury intake. A significant correlation was found between levels of total mercury in blood and in milk (r = .66, p = .0001), with milk levels being an average of 27% of the blood levels. There was an association between inorganic mercury in blood and milk (r = .96, p
PubMed ID
8687245 View in PubMed
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