Skip header and navigation

Refine By

194 records – page 1 of 20.

Absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans by breast-fed infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59296
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
P. Dahl
G. Lindström
K. Wiberg
C. Rappe
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Chemistry, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Benzofurans - metabolism
Body Burden
Breast Feeding
Comparative Study
Feces - chemistry
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Fragmentography
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
The absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans was studied in four breast-fed infants. The absorption was measured by comparing the estimated total intake and the excretion in faeces, during 48 hours, at three different time points; 1, 2 and 3 months post parta. The levels of the analysed compounds in the human milk are typical for Sweden, i.e approximately 20 ppt toxic equivalents for the dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and for the polychlorinated biphenyls approximately 16 ppt toxic equivalents. For most of the congeners the absorption is found to be over 95%. Higher excretion is noticed for heptachlorinated and octachlorinated dioxins.
PubMed ID
7620852 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acrylamide intake via some common baby food for children in Sweden during their first year of life--an improved method for analysis of acrylamide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29785
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
P. Fohgelberg
J. Rosén
K-E Hellenäs
L. Abramsson-Zetterberg
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Toxicology Division, Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Jun;43(6):951-9
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Chromatography, Liquid
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Milk - chemistry
Milk, human - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Sweden
Abstract
The acrylamide levels in breast milk and the main categories of Swedish baby food products, i.e. breast milk substitute (infant formula), gruel, porridge and canned baby food, have been analysed. Furthermore, the acrylamide intake from these products by children up to one year of age has been estimated. Other kind of foods e.g. biscuits, are not included. Because of the expected low concentrations of acrylamide, a new sample extraction method for detection by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, was developed and validated. The lower limit of quantification was 0.5 microg kg(-1) for liquid samples and 2 microg kg(-1) for other samples. The average levels found for gruel, porridge and canned baby food, all ready to eat, were 1.4, 26, and 7.8 microg/kg respectively. We found great variations in the acrylamide levels between and in different food categories,
PubMed ID
15811575 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Swedish human milk. A time-related trend study, 1972-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49225
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 1999 Nov 26;58(6):329-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-1999
Author
D. Meironyté
K. Norén
A. Bergman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Daiva.Meironyte@mbb.ki.se
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 1999 Nov 26;58(6):329-41
Date
Nov-26-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental health - trends
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Flame Retardants - analysis
Humans
Infant
Mass Fragmentography
Milk, human - chemistry
Phenyl Ethers - analysis
Polybrominated Biphenyls - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
A previously described method for analysis of organochlorine compounds in human milk was adopted for analysis of brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) substituted with three to six bromine atoms. Analytes were extracted from human milk with the lipophilic gel Lipidex 5000. Further purifications were performed on partly deactivated aluminum oxide and silica gel columns, followed by gel permeation chromatography. The concentrations of BDEs were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The average recoveries of 2,2',4-triBDE (BDE-17), 2,4,4'-triBDE (BDE-28), 2,2',4,4'-tetraBDE (BDE-47), 2,3',4,4'-tetraBDE (BDE-66), 2,2,3,4,4'-pentaBDE (BDE-85), 2,2',4,4',5-pentaBDE (BDE-99), 2,2',4,4',6-pentaBDE (BDE-100), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexaBDE (BDE-153), and 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexaBDE (BDE-154) added to the samples before extraction ranged from 86% to 102%. Pooled samples of breast milk, collected at eight time periods between 1972 and 1997, were analyzed for PBDEs. BDE-47 was the most abundant PBDE congener in all samples. In total, eight PBDE congeners were identified in the milk. The sum of the concentrations of BDE congeners in human milk increased from 0.07 to 4.02 ng/g lipids during the 25-yr period studied.
PubMed ID
10580757 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Antisecretory Factor in Plasma and Breast Milk in Breastfeeding Mothers-A Prospective Cohort Study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297710
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Sep 04; 10(9):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-04-2018
Author
Anna Gustafsson
Elisabeth Granström
Christina Stecksén-Blicks
Christina E West
Sven-Arne Silfverdal
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, SE 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. anna.gustafsson.1@ki.se.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Sep 04; 10(9):
Date
Sep-04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Breast Diseases - blood - complications
Breast Feeding
Calcium - analysis - blood
Candidiasis - blood - complications
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lactoferrin - analysis - blood
Male
Mastitis - blood - complications
Milk, human - chemistry
Mothers
Neuropeptides - analysis - blood
Plasma - chemistry
Postpartum Period - blood
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Inflammation and infection postpartum threaten the mother and her infant. Human milk provides a defense for the infant, but inflammatory complications like mastitis may lead to the cessation of breastfeeding. Antisecretory factor (AF) has a role in the regulation of secretory processes and inflammation. The objective of the study was to describe AF-levels in plasma and breast milk, and in relation to breast complications. Breastfeeding mothers (n = 95) were consecutively recruited at a Well Baby Clinic in Umeå, Sweden. At inclusion four weeks postpartum, samples of venous blood (10 mL) and breast milk (10 mL) were collected. Active AF was analyzed with ELISA using a monoclonal antibody mAb43, and was detected in all samples of plasma and breast milk with a positive correlation (Spearman coefficient = 0.40, p
PubMed ID
30181494 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing human polychlorinated biphenyl contamination for epidemiologic studies: lessons from patterns of congener concentrations in Canadians in 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185987
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Apr;111(4):437-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Beth C Gladen
Josée Doucet
Larry G Hansen
Author Affiliation
Biostatistics Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. gladen@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Apr;111(4):437-43
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Epidemiologic Studies
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Reproducibility of Results
Specimen Handling
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Humans are always exposed to mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), so assessment of their health effects is complicated. Because the original sources are relatively standard mixtures that change in predictable ways while traversing the environment, there is substantial uniformity in the congener mixtures people carry. To the extent that concentrations are highly correlated, measuring multiple congeners within correlated groups would be unnecessary and estimation of separate biologic effects would be impossible. We examined correlation patterns in previously collected data on 38 congeners (and 14 other organochlorines) from 497 human milk samples from Canada from 1992. Congeners 138, 153, 156, 157, 170, 183, 187, 194, 199, and 203 were highly intercorrelated; 180 had slightly lower correlations with this group. Congeners 74, 105, and 118 were highly intercorrelated and moderately to highly correlated with the first group. Congener 99 had moderate correlations with both these groups, and congener 66 had lesser correlations with the primary group. In contrast, congeners 28, 44, 49, 60, 90/101, 128, 137, and 193 showed little correlation with any other congeners. The remaining 14 congeners were uninformative; they were quantified in fewer than 30% of samples, and varying lipid concentrations meant that those quantified were not necessarily at higher concentrations than those not quantified. In study of human health effects of PCBs, the congener pattern present in the population under study should be examined when deciding which congeners to measure; instead of solely redundant or uninformative congeners, attention should be given to other congeners that may be more useful in addressing the question of interest.
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Nov;109(11):1163-811713002
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Nov;109(11):1153-6111713001
Cites: Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 1985 Jul;14(4):443-503929701
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Oct;77(10):1294-73115123
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1988 Jan;68:141-593129782
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1989 May;81:225-392503374
Cites: Environ Res. 1991 Apr;54(2):121-341903103
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1991 Oct;47(4):491-81786431
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 1992;12:417-411503813
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1994 Jan;102 Suppl 1:149-588187704
Cites: Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 1994 Jun;28(1):1-137523063
Cites: Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(11):2143-537620848
Cites: Eur J Pharmacol. 1995 May 26;293(1):1-407545581
Cites: Chemosphere. 1996 Aug;33(3):559-658680832
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1996 Jul;104(7):712-228841756
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Jan;105(1):13-49074863
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1997;18:211-449143718
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1997 Dec;32(6):606-139358917
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1998 Feb;106 Suppl 1:171-899539012
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1998 Dec;106(12):775-929831538
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jan;35(1):15-209884741
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1999 Mar;35(3):223-319987555
Cites: Environ Res. 1999 Feb;80(2 Pt 2):S46-S5610092419
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107(6):459-6210339445
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 1999 Nov;37(11):1081-810566879
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Feb;108(2):167-7210656858
Cites: Chemosphere. 2000 May-Jun;40(9-11):1075-8210739048
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 2000 May-Jun;55(3):195-20010908103
Cites: J Anal Toxicol. 2000 Sep;24(6):403-2010999346
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Dec;29(6):975-8211101537
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Nov;108(11):1035-4111102293
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Dec 18;263(1-3):197-20811194153
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Feb;109(2):173-811266329
Cites: Environ Res. 2001 Jul;86(3):217-2811453672
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2002 Apr;110(4):411-711940460
PubMed ID
12676596 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of human exposure to chemical contaminants in foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221939
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1993 Jan-Feb;10(1):5-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
H B Conacher
J. Mes
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Health & Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1993 Jan-Feb;10(1):5-15
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cadmium - administration & dosage - analysis
Canada
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Food analysis
Food Contamination
Humans
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Mercury - administration & dosage - analysis
Milk, human - chemistry
Pesticides - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Abstract
One of the most important factors in assessing risk to human health from potentially harmful chemicals in foods is the availability of good data on the exposure of the public to such substances. The means of acquiring these data generally involves monitoring programmes using appropriate sampling procedures and reliable analytical methods for measuring the compounds of concern in a variety of substrates. Two approaches are generally employed: a biological monitoring programme which measures substances in human fluids and tissues, and a food analysis monitoring programme, preferably a total diet study, wherein food is prepared for consumption prior to analysis. The choice of approach to use and chemicals to monitor depend on the situation within a particular country. The analysis of food has the advantage of short term impact since problems can be identified relatively quickly and control measures established. Biological monitoring on the other hand tends to indicate both accumulated and current exposure from all sources, including air, water and food. In Canada both approaches have been used for a number of years with major surveys of human milk and adipose tissue, and the total diet study, being conducted approximately every five years. Details of these programmes together with some of the pertinent findings are presented.
PubMed ID
8504874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of pre- and postnatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls: lessons from the Inuit Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4473
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Centre, Québec, Québec, Canada. pierre.ayotte@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1253-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Breast Feeding
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Forecasting
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Milk, human - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are food-chain contaminants that have been shown to induce adverse developmental effects in humans. In the course of an epidemiologic study established to investigate neurodevelopmental deficits induced by environmental PCB exposure in the Inuit population of northern Québec (Nunavik, Canada), we compared three biomarkers of prenatal exposure and models to predict PCB plasma concentration at 6 months postpartum. Concentrations of 14 PCB congeners were measured by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection in lipids extracted from maternal plasma, cord plasma, breast milk (collected at approximately 1 month postpartum), and 6-month-old infant plasma samples. Similar congener profiles were observed in all biologic samples, and PCB-153, the most abundant and persistent PCB congener, was strongly correlated with other frequently detected PCB congeners in all biologic media. When expressed on a lipid basis, maternal plasma, cord plasma, and milk concentrations of this congener were strongly intercorrelated, indicating that PCB concentration in any of these biologic media is a good indicator of prenatal exposure to PCBs. A multivariate model that included maternal PCB-153 plasma lipid concentration, breast-feeding duration, and the sum of two skin-fold thicknesses (an index of infant body fat mass) explained 72% of PCB-153 plasma concentration variance at 6 months postpartum (p
PubMed ID
12842782 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between chemical pattern in breast milk and congenital cryptorchidism: modelling of complex human exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125071
Source
Int J Androl. 2012 Jun;35(3):294-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
K. Krysiak-Baltyn
J. Toppari
N E Skakkebaek
T S Jensen
H E Virtanen
K-W Schramm
H. Shen
T. Vartiainen
H. Kiviranta
O. Taboureau
K. Audouze
S. Brunak
K M Main
Author Affiliation
Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Int J Androl. 2012 Jun;35(3):294-302
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Artificial Intelligence
Cryptorchidism - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dioxins - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Systems Biology
Abstract
During the past four decades, there has been an increase in the incidence rate of male reproductive disorders in some, but not all, Western countries. The observed increase in the prevalence of male reproductive disorders is suspected to be ascribable to environmental factors as the increase has been too rapid to be explained by genetics alone. To study the association between complex chemical exposures of humans and congenital cryptorchidism, the most common malformation of the male genitalia, we measured 121 environmental chemicals with suspected or known endocrine disrupting properties in 130 breast milk samples from Danish and Finnish mothers. Half the newborns were healthy controls, whereas the other half was boys with congenital cryptorchidism. The measured chemicals included polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl-ethers, dioxins (OCDD/PCDFs), phthalates, polybrominated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides. Computational analysis of the data was performed using logistic regression and three multivariate machine learning classifiers. Furthermore, we performed systems biology analysis to explore the chemical influence on a molecular level. After correction for multiple testing, exposure to nine chemicals was significantly different between the cases and controls in the Danish cohort, but not in the Finnish cohort. The multivariate analysis indicated that Danish samples exhibited a stronger correlation between chemical exposure patterns in breast milk and cryptorchidism than Finnish samples. Moreover, PCBs were indicated as having a protective effect within the Danish cohort, which was supported by molecular data recovered through systems biology. Our results lend further support to the hypothesis that the mixture of environmental chemicals may contribute to observed adverse trends in male reproductive health.
PubMed ID
22519522 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between prenatal polychlorinated biphenyl exposure and obesity development at ages 5 and 7 y: a prospective cohort study of 656 children from the Faroe Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106521
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):5-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jeanett L Tang-Péronard
Berit L Heitmann
Helle R Andersen
Ulrike Steuerwald
Philippe Grandjean
Pál Weihe
Tina K Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark (JLT-P, HRA, PG, and TKJ); the Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Frederiksberg, Denmark (JLT-P and BLH); the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark (BLH); the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, Australia (BLH); the Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands (US); and the Department of Environmental Medicine, Faroese Hospital System, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands (PW).
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):5-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Body Weight - drug effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Exposure
Milk, human - chemistry
Obesity - chemically induced
Overweight - blood - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Prospective Studies
Waist Circumference - drug effects
Abstract
Chemicals with endocrine-disrupting abilities may act as obesogens and interfere with the body's natural weight-control mechanisms, especially if exposure occurs during prenatal life.
We examined the association between prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and subsequent obesity at 5 and 7 y of age.
From 1997 to 2000, 656 pregnant Faroese women were recruited. PCB and DDE were measured in maternal serum and breast milk, and children's weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured at clinical examinations at 5 and 7 y of age. The change in body mass index (BMI) from 5 to 7 y of age was calculated. Analyses were performed by using multiple linear regression models for girls and boys separately, taking into account maternal prepregnancy BMI.
For 7-y-old girls who had overweight mothers, PCB was associated with increased BMI (ß = 2.07, P = 0.007), and PCB and DDE were associated with an increased change in BMI from 5 to 7 y of age (PCB: ß = 1.23, P = 0.003; DDE: ß = 1.11, P = 0.008). No association was observed with BMI in girls with normal-weight mothers. PCB was associated with increased WC in girls with overweight mothers (ß = 2.48, P = 0.001) and normal-weight mothers (ß = 1.25, P = 0.04); DDE was associated with increased WC only in girls with overweight mothers (ß = 2.21, P = 0.002). No associations were observed between PCB or DDE and BMI in 5-y-old girls. For boys, no associations were observed.
Results suggest that prenatal exposure to PCB and DDE may play a role for subsequent obesity development. Girls whose mothers have a high prepregnancy BMI seem most affected.
PubMed ID
24153349 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between brominated flame retardants in human milk and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in neonates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134309
Source
Environ Res. 2011 Aug;111(6):737-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Merete Eggesbø
Cathrine Thomsen
Jens V Jørgensen
Georg Becher
Jon Øyvind Odland
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Department of Genes and Environment, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. merete.eggesbo@fhi.no
Source
Environ Res. 2011 Aug;111(6):737-43
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Flame Retardants - analysis
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Thyrotropin - blood - drug effects
Abstract
Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been in widespread use in a vast array of consumer products since the 1970s. The metabolites of some BFRs show a structural similarity to thyroid hormones and experimental animal studies have confirmed that they may interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. A major concern has been whether intrauterine exposure to BFRs may disturb thyroid homeostasis since the fetal brain is particularly susceptible to alterations in thyroid hormones. However, few reports on newborns have been published to date.
To evaluate the association between BFRs and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH).
We studied six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in milk samples from 239 women who were part of the "Norwegian Human Milk Study" (HUMIS), 2003-2006. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 were measured in a subset of the women (193 and 46 milk samples, respectively). The milk was sampled at a median of 33 days after delivery. TSH was measured in babies three days after delivery as part of the routine national screening program for early detection of congenital hypothyroidism. Additional information was obtained through the Medical Birth Registry and questionnaires to the mothers.
The PBDE concentrations in human milk in Norway were comparable to concentrations reported from other European countries and Asia, but not the US and Canada where levels are approximately one order of higher magnitude. We observed no statistically significant associations between BDE-47, 99, 153, 154, 209 and HBCD in human milk and TSH in models adjusted for possible confounders and other environmental toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).
We did not observe an association between TSH and exposure to HBCD and PBDEs within the exposure levels observed.
Notes
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):440-910857867
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Oct;116(10):1376-8218941581
Cites: Arch Toxicol. 2001 Jun;75(4):200-811482517
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Feb;109(2):222-711826199
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2002 May;67(1):98-10311961221
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1235-4112842779
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jul;111(9):1249-5212842781
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2003 Nov;76(1):112-2012915714
Cites: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Oct-Nov;16(8):1131-514594173
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2004 Mar;78(1):144-5514999130
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Jun;89(6):2824-3115181064
Cites: Thyroid. 2004 Jun;14(6):435-4215242570
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2004 Oct;81(2):491-50115254340
Cites: Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 1990 Sep-Oct;19(5):640-52122815
Cites: Thyroid. 1994 Spring;4(1):107-288054857
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1994 Jun;102 Suppl 2:125-307925183
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Aug 19;341(8):549-5510451459
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2004 Nov;151 Suppl 3:U25-3715554884
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2009 Aug 1;407(16):4584-9019457543
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Sep;117(9):1380-619750101
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Dec;116(12):1635-4119079713
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2009 Mar;212(2):109-3418554980
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2009 May 1;407(10):3425-919211133
Cites: Environ Res. 2009 Jul;109(5):559-6619410245
Cites: Environ Int. 2010 Jan;36(1):68-7419889457
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Dec;117(12):1953-820049217
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jan;118(1):155-6020056574
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 May;118(5):712-920056561
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Oct;118(10):1444-920562054
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Aug;78(7):584-9215902483
Cites: Chemosphere. 2006 Jun;64(2):181-616434082
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Jun 15;40(12):3679-8816830527
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2006 Dec;94(2):281-9216984958
Cites: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2007 Feb 1;846(1-2):252-6317023223
Cites: J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2007 Jun;20(6):473-617674257
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Sep;115(9):1271-517805415
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Oct;115(10):1490-617938741
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2008 Feb 1;226(3):244-5017964624
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 Feb;52(2):187-9318186105
Cites: Thyroid. 2008 Jan;18(1):67-7618302520
Cites: Int J Androl. 2008 Apr;31(2):152-6018315715
Cites: Chemosphere. 2008 Oct;73(6):907-1418718632
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;56(2):138-4311339677
PubMed ID
21601188 View in PubMed
Less detail

194 records – page 1 of 20.