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[About interdepartmental program "Rehabilitation of servicemen, citizens dismissed from military service, and law enforcement personnel suffered during combat and antiterrorist operations"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181403
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2003 Dec;324(12):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003

Accidental exposure to electromagnetic fields from the radar of a naval ship: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256376
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bente E Moen
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Nils Bull
Gunnhild Oftedal
Kjell Hansson Mild
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. bente.moen@isf.uib.no.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adult
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radar
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
Part of a crew on a Norwegian naval ship was exposed to the radar waves for approximately 7 min from an American destroyer during an incident at sea in August 2012. Information about the exposure was not given by the navy. This is a description of what happened with the crew on board after this event. 14 persons had been on the ship bridge or outside on the deck during the exposure and the rest of the crew had been inside the ship. 27 persons were examined at a hospital 6-8 months after the event, as they had developeda large number of symptoms from different organ systems. They were very worried about all types of possible adverse health effects due to the incident. All were examined by an occupational physician and anophthalmologist, by an interview, clinical examinations and blood tests at the hospital. The interview of the personnel revealed that they had not experienced any major heating during the episode. Their symptoms developed days or weeks after the radar exposure. They had no objective signs of adverse health effects at the examination related to the incident. Long-term health effect from the exposure is highly unlikely. The development of different symptoms after the incident was probably due to the fear of possible health consequences. Better routines for such incidents at sea should be developed to avoid this type of anxiety.
PubMed ID
24408137 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acquired capability for suicide among individuals with American Indian/Alaska Native backgrounds within the military.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286165
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2016;23(4):1-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Bruno Chiurliza
Matthew S Michaels
Thomas E Joiner
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2016;23(4):1-15
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska Natives - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Suicide - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study observes a military sample across race to better understand suicide risk among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals utilizing the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide. In a sample of 3,387 Army recruiters, multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare the means across race on acquired capability and pain tolerance. AI/AN individuals demonstrated higher levels of acquired capability for suicide (p = .056) and pain tolerance (p = .028). These findings indicate that acquired capability and pain tolerance are key elements involved in suicide risk among AI/AN individuals within the military.
PubMed ID
27536895 View in PubMed
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Acute stress reactions after submarine accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74958
Source
Mil Med. 2002 May;167(5):427-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Jarle Eid
Bjørn Helge Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Royal Norwegian Naval Academy, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Mil Med. 2002 May;167(5):427-31
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Analysis of Variance
Humans
Male
Military Personnel - psychology
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to explore contextual and individual factors associated with acute stress reactions in three Norwegian submarine crews exposed to different significant peacetime maneuver accidents. Approximately 2 to 3 weeks after the accidents, crew members completed the Coping Style Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire, the Impact of Event Scale, and the Post-Traumatic Symptom Scale. Although exposed subjects (N = 47) revealed more posttraumatic stress symptoms than nonexposed crew members on shore leave (N = 7), they showed less acute stress reactions than survivors from a surface ship accident in the Norwegian Navy. Inspection of individual cases revealed that 4% of the exposed submariners showed high loads of acute stress symptoms. Unit cohesion and habitual coping styles emerged as resilience factors, whereas previous exposure to critical incidents and personal experience of not coping in the accident situation emerged as vulnerability factors, explaining 32% of the acute stress reactions reported by submarine crew members.
PubMed ID
12053854 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation to coronary artery disease: first pilot study in the military.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206867
Source
Mil Med. 1997 Dec;162(12):792-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J R Swenson
J. Grenier
R. Nolan
G M FitzGibbon
A J Leach
S. Raman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ottawa General Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Mil Med. 1997 Dec;162(12):792-7
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety
Canada
Coronary Disease - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Pilot Projects
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To determine how a group of 29 male military patients with coronary artery disease (CAD-MIL group) have adapted physically and psychosocially, we compared results from standard questionnaires with those from 39 healthy military men (WELL-MIL group) and 27 male civilian patients with coronary artery disease (CAD-CIV group). There was no difference in the degree of severity of coronary artery disease between the two groups with the disease. The WELL-MIL group reported a higher activity level than the CAD-MIL group, which reported a higher activity level than the CAD-CIV group. Both the CAD-MIL group and WELL-MIL groups had lower levels of state anxiety compared with the CAD-CIV group, and the CAD-MIL group had a better overall psychosocial adjustment score compared with that of the CAD-CIV group. Thus, male military patients with coronary artery disease reported better physical and psychosocial adjustment to their illness than a group of male civilian patients with a similar degree of disease severity. but they were less physically active than healthy military men.
PubMed ID
9433083 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation to unit conditions is a guarantee in preserving the health of servicemen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206282
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1997 Dec;318(12):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997

Adverse childhood experiences in relation to mood and anxiety disorders in a population-based sample of active military personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124248
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
J. Sareen
C A Henriksen
S L Bolton
T O Afifi
M B Stein
G J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although it has been posited that exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increases vulnerability to deployment stress, previous literature in this area has demonstrated conflicting results. Using a cross-sectional population-based sample of active military personnel, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs, deployment related stressors and mood and anxiety disorders.
Data were analyzed from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey-Canadian Forces Supplement (CCHS-CFS; n = 8340, age 18-54 years, response rate 81%). The following ACEs were self-reported retrospectively: childhood physical abuse, childhood sexual abuse, economic deprivation, exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce/separation, parental substance abuse problems, hospitalization as a child, and apprehension by a child protection service. DSM-IV mood and anxiety disorders [major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic attacks/disorder and social phobia] were assessed using the composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI).
Even after adjusting for the effects of deployment-related traumatic exposures (DRTEs), exposure to ACEs was significantly associated with past-year mood or anxiety disorder among men [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.34, 99% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.73, p
PubMed ID
22608015 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age-related changes in operators' activities and brain bioelectrical activity in the Navy specialists].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177467
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2004 Sep;325(9):46-51, 80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
O A Viatleva
V G Barchukov
Iu A Salenko
S V Krylov
O N Gracheva
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2004 Sep;325(9):46-51, 80
Date
Sep-2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Attention - physiology
Brain - physiology
Electroencephalography
Humans
Male
Memory - physiology
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Russia
Abstract
Psycho- and neurophysiologic investigation of 66 Navy specialists aged 18-71 has revealed the consecutive age-related worsening of different components of operators' activities with predominant and more early disorders in the processes of sensomotor coordination and attention. Apparently the age-related changes in functional state of certain cerebral areas underlie the observed disorders in operators' activities. It is supported by the results of correlation analysis between neurophysiologic and psychophysiologic indices.
PubMed ID
15537103 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol abuse and suicide: a 40-year prospective study of Norwegian conscripts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11405
Source
Addiction. 1995 May;90(5):685-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
I. Rossow
A. Amundsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 1995 May;90(5):685-91
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - mortality - psychology
Cause of Death
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Suicide mortality among alcohol abusers and the prevalence of alcohol abusers among suicides were assessed in a 40-year follow-up study of 40,000 Norwegian military conscripts. Alcohol abuse was operationalized as either admission to alcohol treatment clinic, alcohol related cause of death, or both. The relative risk of suicide among alcohol abusers was estimated to 6.9. The relative risk of committing suicide among alcohol abusers appeared to be higher in middle age (more than 40 years) than in younger age groups (RR = 12.8 and 4.5, respectively). The life-time risk of suicide, i.e. before the age of 60 years, was estimated to 0.63% for those not categorized as alcohol abusers and 4.76% for those categorized as alcohol abusers.
PubMed ID
7795504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and psychiatric illness: longitudinal study of psychiatric admissions in a cohort of Swedish conscripts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12027
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Jun;26(6):713-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
S. Andréasson
P. Allebeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Int J Addict. 1991 Jun;26(6):713-28
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Military Personnel - psychology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between level of alcohol consumption and admission for psychiatric care during a 15-year follow-up was studied in a cohort of 49,464 Swedish conscripts. The relative risk for psychiatric admission among high consumers of alcohol (more than 250 g alcohol per week) was 5.3 (95% confidence interval 4.7-6.0) compared with moderate consumers (1-100 g alcohol per week). After control for social background variables in a multivariate model, the odds ratio was 1.8 (1.5-2.1). Abstainers had the same rate of admission as moderate consumers. The association with alcohol was positive in all diagnostic categories studied. Neurotic depression was found to be a risk factor for admission for alcoholism, indicating that a causal association between alcohol and neurotic depression may go in both directions.
PubMed ID
1757174 View in PubMed
Less detail

269 records – page 1 of 27.