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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Career development of military nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214611
Source
Can Nurse. 1995 Aug;91(7):25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995

A comparison of experiences of training emergency care in military exercises and competences among conscript nurses with different levels of education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84983
Source
Mil Med. 2007 Oct;172(10):1046-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Johansson Anders
Odén Anders
Dahlgren Lars-Owe
Sjöström Björn
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköpings University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Mil Med. 2007 Oct;172(10):1046-52
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Emergency medical services
Humans
Leadership
Military Medicine
Military Nursing - education
Military Personnel
Questionnaires
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
The military emergency care education of nurses is primarily concerned with the treatment of soldiers with combat-related injuries. Even though great progress has been made in military medicine, there is still the pedagogical question of what emergency care education for military nurses should contain and how it should be taught. The aim of this study was to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education. A descriptive study was performed to describe and compare experiences of training emergency care in military exercises among conscript nurses with different levels of education in nursing. There were statistical differences between nurses with general nursing education and nurses with a general nursing education and supplementary education. A reasonable implication of the differences is that the curriculum must be designed differently depending on the educational background of the students. Hence, there is an interaction between background characteristics, e.g., the level of previous education and differences pertaining to clinical experience of the participants, and the impact of the exercise itself.
PubMed ID
17985764 View in PubMed
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Establishing a collaborative trauma training program with a community trauma center for military nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194982
Source
Int J Trauma Nurs. 2001 Apr-Jun;7(2):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
K J McNamara
C. Schulman
D. Jepsen
J E Cuffley
Author Affiliation
Naval Hospital Bremerton, Washington 98312, USA.
Source
Int J Trauma Nurs. 2001 Apr-Jun;7(2):49-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Military Nursing - education
Northwestern United States
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
A mission of the Navy Nurse Corps is to deploy medical support for military forces on short notice. Navy nurses must possess a working knowledge of trauma management, but meeting this clinical experience is a challenge. Peacetime military hospitals do not routinely care for severely injured patients. This article describes how the Navy established a partnership with a Level 1 Trauma Center, the role and expectations for both Navy and civilian nurses, and an evaluation of the experience.
PubMed ID
11313625 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exercise Rolling Deep September 1997: a nurse's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50008
Source
J R Nav Med Serv. 1998;84(1):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K A Salt
Source
J R Nav Med Serv. 1998;84(1):30-1
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Continuing - organization & administration
Emergency Medicine - education
Great Britain
Humans
Military Nursing - education
Patient care team
Abstract
The integration of the RNST with Med Squadron was the main objective of Exercise Rolling Deep. This objective was achieved most effectively and clearly indicated that should we be required to attend an operational deployment the teams are now much better prepared. The opportunity to experiment with the new surgical equipment was most useful and the experience of living in second line field conditions were both interesting and eye-opening! Med Squadron made a particular effort to make the exercise taxing but enjoyable which was appreciated by us all. In conclusion, the most poignant message felt by many was how valuable the senior and more experienced members of the team are. Appreciation must be expressed to those certain few who put so much effort into making the exercise such a valuable learning experience. All-in-all however, a highly beneficial exercise to have been allowed to experience--roll on Norway!
PubMed ID
9894399 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hard labor: the personal experiences of two obstetric nurses in Balad, Iraq.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143220
Source
Nurs Clin North Am. 2010 Jun;45(2):193-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Katrina Poole
Angela Lacek
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Unit, Elmendorf Air Force Base Hospital, 5955 Zeamer Avenue/EAFB, Elmendorf Air Force Base, AK 99506, USA. katrina.poole@elmendorf.af.mil
Source
Nurs Clin North Am. 2010 Jun;45(2):193-203
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Emergency Nursing - education - organization & administration
Humans
Iraq War, 2003-2011
Job Satisfaction
Military Nursing - education - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Obstetric Nursing - organization & administration
Perioperative Nursing - education - organization & administration
Preceptorship
Self Efficacy
United States
Abstract
This article describes the experiences of two obstetric nurses as they deployed to the war zone in Iraq. Each discusses her role as a medical-surgical nurse and an emergency room nurse, respectively, and how she dealt with learning to practice in these areas. Each nurse came away from the experience with newfound confidence in her abilities and an appreciation for flexibility in practice. They also describe the challenges of deployment and being away from family, and how they coped with their feelings associated with nursing in a war zone and caring for injured service members and the indigenous population.
PubMed ID
20510704 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nursing in the military breaking boundaries and forging ties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159728
Source
Alta RN. 2007 Nov;63(9):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007

7 records – page 1 of 1.