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A 40-year follow-up of school children with migraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34250
Source
Cephalalgia. 1997 Jun;17(4):488-91; discussion 487
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
B. Bille
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Cephalalgia. 1997 Jun;17(4):488-91; discussion 487
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A prevalence study of 9000 Swedish school children conducted in 1955 showed that nearly 4% had migraine. The prevalence of migraine was 1.4% at 7 years of age and 5.3% at 15 years of age. From the age of 11 there was a gradual increase of migraine headache and a predominance among girls. A subgroup of 73 children with pronounced migraine and an average onset of 6 years was followed during a period of 40 years. The results showed that 23% of the children were migraine-free before the age of 25, boys significantly more often than girls. However, around the age of 50, more than half of the migraine group still had migraine attacks. A recall bias was found in that a number of the subjects in their middle-life (41%) could not remember that they had had aura symptoms previously. Of those who had become parents, 52% have in their present or previous families had one child or more who had developed recurrent headache, probably of the migraine-type.
PubMed ID
9209767 View in PubMed
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Adult cervicocerebral artery dissection: a single-center study of 301 Finnish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152620
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2009 Jun;16(6):656-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
T M Metso
A J Metso
O. Salonen
E. Haapaniemi
J. Putaala
V. Artto
J. Helenius
M. Kaste
T. Tatlisumak
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2009 Jun;16(6):656-61
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Brain Infarction - epidemiology
Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection - mortality
Carotid Stenosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Humans
Infection - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Mortality
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Vertebral Artery Dissection - mortality
Abstract
There are only few small studies assessing potential risk factors, comorbidity, and prognostic factors in adult spontaneous cervicocerebral artery dissection (CAD).
We conducted a retrospective, hospital-based analysis on the prognostic factors and association of CAD with vascular risk factors in 301 consecutive Finnish patients, diagnosed from 1994 to 2007.
Two thirds of the patients were men (68%). Women were younger than men. Migraine (36% of all patients), especially with visual aura (63% of all migraineurs), and smoking were more common in patients with CAD compared with the general Finnish population. At 3 months, 247 (83%) patients reached a favorable outcome. Occlusion of the dissected artery, internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD), and recent infection in infarction patients were associated with a poorer outcome. ICAD patients had less often brain infarction, but the strokes they had were more severe. Seven (2.3%) patients died during the follow-up (mean 4.0 years, 1186 patient years). Six (2%) patients had verified CAD recurrence.
This study provides evidence for the association of CAD with male sex, and possible association with smoking and migraine. Occlusion of the dissected artery, ICAD, and infection appear to be associated with poorer outcome.
PubMed ID
19220449 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily ED visits for migraine and headache in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150066
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2009 May;27(4):391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
David M Stieb
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A OK9. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2009 May;27(4):391-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Alberta - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Weather
Abstract
A variety of environmental factors have been identified as possible triggers for migraine and other headache syndromes.
We analyzed associations between air pollution and emergency department (ED) visits for migraine and headache.
Analysis was based on 56,241 ED visits for migraine and 48,022 ED visits for headache to Edmonton hospitals between 1992 and 2002. A Poisson model of counts hierarchically clustered by day of week, month, and year was applied using generalized linear mixed models. Temperature and relative humidity were included as covariates.
Females accounted for 78.5% of migraine visits and 56.3% of headache visits. An interquartile range (IQR) increase (6.2 microg/m3) in daily average particulate matter of median aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) was associated with increases in visits of 3.3% for migraine (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.6-6.0), lagged 2 days, and 3.4% for headache (95% CI: 0.3-6.6), lagged 0 days, among females in the cold season (October-March). PM2.5 was also associated with cold season migraine visits among females at lag 0 and 1 day (P
PubMed ID
19555607 View in PubMed
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Analysis of 31 families with an apparently autosomal-dominant transmission of migraine with aura in the nuclear family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34194
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1997 Jul 25;74(4):395-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-1997
Author
V. Ulrich
M B Russell
S. Ostergaard
J. Olesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1997 Jul 25;74(4):395-7
Date
Jul-25-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Family
Female
Genes, Dominant
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Pedigree
Prevalence
Risk
Sex Factors
Abstract
We analyzed 31 families selected for an apparently autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance of migraine with aura (MA) in the nuclear family. The nuclear families were expanded with first- and second-degree relatives. All interviews were made by physicians experienced in headache diagnoses. The criteria of the International Headache Society were used. The population relative risk among children in nuclear families was similar to the estimated population relative risk of MA assuming an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. The population relative risk tended to decrease among first-degree relatives outside nuclear families and further among second-degree relatives. Both first- and second-degree relatives outside the nuclear families had a statistically significant lower risk of MA than expected. Thus, autosomal-dominant inheritance with or without reduced penetrance was unlikely. Autosomal-recessive inheritance was unlikely because of the unequal sex distribution. Other modes of inheritance were considered as well. Mitochondrial and X-linked inheritance were excluded because of paternal transmission. The female preponderance was too low to explain sex-influenced inheritance. We conclude that MA most likely has a multifactorial inheritance even in high-risk families with MA.
PubMed ID
9259375 View in PubMed
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[A role of information-education programs in the treatment of patients with chronic headache].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105285
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(11):59-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013

Association between blood pressure measures and recurrent headache in adolescents: cross-sectional data from the HUNT-Youth study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137255
Source
J Headache Pain. 2011 Jun;12(3):347-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Erling Tronvik
John-Anker Zwart
Knut Hagen
Grete Dyb
Turid Lingaas Holmen
Lars Jacob Stovner
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Norwegian National Headache Centre, Trondheim University Hospital, 7006, Trondheim, Norway. Erling.Tronvik@ntnu.no
Source
J Headache Pain. 2011 Jun;12(3):347-53
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Tension-Type Headache - epidemiology - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship between blood pressure and headache in youth has not been explored and the objective of the present study was to provide data on this association in an adolescent population. Cross-sectional data from a large population-based survey, the Young-HUNT study, on 5,847 adolescents were used to evaluate the association between blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean arterial and pulse pressure) and recurrent headache, including migraine and tension-type headache. Increasing pulse pressure was inversely related to recurrent headache prevalence, and both tension-type headache and migraine. For systolic blood pressure such an inverse relationship was present for recurrent headache and tension-type headache prevalence. For migraine, the results were not significant, although there was a tendency in the same direction (p = 0.05). High-pulse pressure has previously been found to be inversely related to the prevalence of migraine and tension-type headache in an adult population. This inverse relationship has now been demonstrated to be present among adolescents also, supporting the results from a previous study in adults, that blood pressure regulation may be linked to the pathophysiology of headache.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21301921 View in PubMed
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Association between eating disorders and migraine may be explained by major depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262786
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2014 Dec;47(8):884-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Linda Mustelin
Anu Raevuori
Jaakko Kaprio
Anna Keski-Rahkonen
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2014 Dec;47(8):884-7
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - epidemiology
Bulimia Nervosa - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Self Report
Abstract
The association between eating disorders and migraine remains unclear.
We identified women with lifetime diagnoses of anorexia nervosa (AN) (N?=?55) and bulimia nervosa (BN) (N?=?60) and their co-twins from the FinnTwin16 cohort born in 1975-1979 (N?=?2,825 women). Eating disorder and major depressive disorder (MDD) diagnoses were obtained from clinical interviews and data on migraine by self-report questionnaire. The women with eating disorders were compared with their unaffected co-twins and with unrelated women from the same birth cohorts.
The prevalence of migraine was 12% in the general female population, but 22% for both AN and BN (odds ratio 2.0, p?=?.04). The prevalence of MDD was high in women with an eating disorder (42%). MDD was strongly associated with migraine (odds ratio 3.0, p?
PubMed ID
24888633 View in PubMed
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Association between migraine, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136317
Source
J Headache Pain. 2011 Apr;12(2):157-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Han Le
Peer Tfelt-Hansen
Axel Skytthe
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Jes Olesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, The Danish Headache Centre, Glostrup Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Headache Pain. 2011 Apr;12(2):157-72
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Migraine with Aura - epidemiology
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sedentary lifestyle
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether sex-specific associations exist between migraine, lifestyle or socioeconomic factors. We distinguished between the subtypes migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO). In 2002, a questionnaire containing validated questions to diagnose migraine and questions on lifestyle and socioeconomic factors was sent to 46,418 twin individuals residing in Denmark. 31,865 twin individuals aged 20-71 were included. The twins are representative of the Danish population with regard to migraine and other somatic diseases and were used as such in the present study. An increased risk of migraine was significantly associated with lower level of schooling and education, retirement, unemployment, and smoking. A decreased risk of migraine was significantly associated with heavy physical exercise and intake of alcohol. Direct comparison between the subtypes showed a decreased risk of MA compared to MO in subjects with low education or weekly intake of alcohol. The risk of MA was increased compared to MO in unemployed or retired subjects. Direct comparison between sexes showed a decreased risk of migraine for men compared to women in subjects who were low educated, unemployed or studying. The risk was increased for men compared to women in subjects with heavy physical exercise, intake of alcohol, and body mass index >25. Migraine was associated with several lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Most associations such as low education and employment status were probably due to the negative effects of having migraine while others such as smoking were risk factors for migraine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21390550 View in PubMed
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Association of excessive daytime sleepiness with migraine and headache frequency in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282223
Source
J Headache Pain. 2017 Dec;18(1):35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Knut Stavem
Håvard Anton Kristiansen
Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen
Kari Jorunn Kværner
Michael Bjørn Russell
Source
J Headache Pain. 2017 Dec;18(1):35
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Norway
Odds Ratio
Young Adult
Abstract
Some previous studies have postulated an association between migraine and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). This study evaluated the association of EDS with migraine and headache frequency in a general population, after adjusting for potential confounding variables.
The study was a postal survey of a random age and gender-stratified sample of 40,000 persons aged 20 to 80 years old drawn by the National Population Register in Norway. The questionnaire included questions about migraine, headache, the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and various comorbidities. EDS was defined as ESS?>?10. The association of EDS and migraine/headache were analysed by bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses.
A total of 21,177 persons responded to the ESS and were included in the analyses. The odds ratio (OR) for EDS was increased for migraineurs (1.42 (95% CI 1.31-1.54), p?179 days per year compared to those without headache in multivariable analysis.
In a general population, the odds for EDS increased significantly with the headache frequency, irrespective of migraine status. EDS was not associated with reported migraine in multivariable analysis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28321593 View in PubMed
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Associations between sleep disturbance and primary headaches: the third Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99425
Source
J Headache Pain. 2010 Jun;11(3):197-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Siv Steinsmo Ødegård
Morten Engstrøm
Trond Sand
Lars Jacob Stovner
John-Anker Zwart
Knut Hagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, MTFS, 7489 Trondheim, Norway. sivstein@stud.ntnu.no
Source
J Headache Pain. 2010 Jun;11(3):197-206
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Causality
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - epidemiology
Female
Headache Disorders, Primary - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Norway
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Tension-Type Headache - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between sleep disturbance and headache type and frequency, in a random sample of participants in the third Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey. The headache diagnoses were set by neurologists using the ICHD-2 criteria performing a semi structured face-to-face interview. Sleep problems were measured by the two validated instruments Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Among 297 participants, 77 subjects were headache-free, whereas 135 were diagnosed with tension-type headache (TTH), 51 with migraine, and 34 with other headache diagnoses. In the multivariate analyses, using logistic regression, excessive daytime sleepiness, defined as ESS >or= 10, was three times more likely among migraineurs compared with headache-free individuals (OR = 3.3, 95% CI 1.0-10.2). Severe sleep disturbances, defined as KSQ score in the upper quartile, was five times more likely among migraineurs (OR = 5.4, 95% CI 2.0-15.5), and three times more likely for subjects with TTH (OR = 3.3, 1.4-7.3) compared with headache-free individuals. Subjects with chronic headache were 17 times more likely to have severe sleep disturbances (OR = 17.4, 95% CI 5.1-59.8), and the association was somewhat stronger for chronic migraine (OR = 38.9, 95% CI 3.1-485.3) than for chronic TTH (OR = 18.3, 95% CI 3.6-93.0). In conclusion, there was a significant association between severe sleep disturbances and primary headache disorders, most pronounced for those with chronic headache. Even though one cannot address causality in the present study design, the results indicate an increased awareness of sleep problems among patients with headache.
PubMed ID
20224943 View in PubMed
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117 records – page 1 of 12.