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The acceptability and feasibility of an intercultural birth center in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114720
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kathryn Tucker
Hector Ochoa
Rosario Garcia
Kirsty Sievwright
Amy Chambliss
Margaret C Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, NHS, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Birthing Centers - utilization
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Home Childbirth
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Mexico
Midwifery - education - standards
Patient Preference - ethnology
Pregnancy
Abstract
An intercultural birthing house was established in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, as an intervention to reduce maternal mortality among indigenous women. This birth center, known locally as the Casa Materna, is a place where women can come to give birth with their traditional birth attendant. However, three months after opening, no woman had used the birthing house.
This study reports on the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to childbirth and use of the Casa Materna from the perspective of the health workers, traditional birth attendants and the program's target population. Structured interviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with participants from each of these groups. Data was searched for emerging themes and coded.
Findings show that the potential success of this program is jeopardized by lack of transport and a strong cultural preference for home births. The paper highlights the importance of community participation in planning and implementing such an intervention and of establishing trust and mutual respect among key actors. Recommendations are provided for moving forward the maternal health agenda of indigenous women in Chiapas.
Notes
Cites: J Sex Res. 2002 Feb;39(1):58-6212476258
Cites: Midwifery. 2004 Sep;20(3):217-2515337277
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 2004 Sep-Oct;46(5):388-9815521523
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(4):785-9515950091
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 3;367(9525):1859-6916753489
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Sep 30;368(9542):1189-20017011946
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2007;3:3117803820
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Mar;66(5):1057-6918187246
Cites: Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2008 Aug;24(2):75-8419062598
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Aug;25(4):411-2118053623
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2011 Nov;26(6):496-50721278371
PubMed ID
23587122 View in PubMed
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The ALARM course: 10 years of continuing professional development in intrapartum care and risk management in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167875
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2006 Jul;28(7):600-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006

Analysis of midwifery students' written reflections to evaluate progression in learning during clinical practice at birthing units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266484
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2015 Mar;15(2):134-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Eva K Persson
Linda J Kvist
Maria Ekelin
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2015 Mar;15(2):134-40
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delivery Rooms
Educational Measurement - methods
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Midwifery - education
Pregnancy
Problem-Based Learning
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Writing
Abstract
Written daily reflections during clinical practice on birthing units have been used during several years in midwifery education at Lund University, Sweden. However, the usefulness of these reflections for evaluation of progression in learning and professional development of students has to date not been evaluated. In order to analyse written reflections, two taxonomies developed by Bloom and Pettersen have been applied to the texts. Progression in the professional development of midwifery students can be seen through levels of complexity in cognitive and psycho-motor learning areas and also in the description of learning situations. Progression can be seen from a basic description of facts in simple situations at the beginning of the students' practice to a complex description of complicated situations towards the end of the practice. Written daily reflections appear to be a suitable method to help students to reflect in a structured way, thereby helping their professional development. Reflections can help clinical supervisors to understand the needs of the individual student and to support their knowledge accruement. Daily written reflections on clinical practice can be of use in other health education programs.
PubMed ID
25661056 View in PubMed
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An exploration and description of student midwives' experiences in offering continuous labour support to women/couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94025
Source
Midwifery. 2008 Dec;24(4):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Thorstensson Stina
Nissen Eva
Ekström Anette
Author Affiliation
School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden. stina.thorstensson@his.se
Source
Midwifery. 2008 Dec;24(4):451-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delivery, Obstetric - nursing
Female
Humans
Male
Midwifery - education
Mothers - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - methods
Pregnancy
Social Support
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Writing
Abstract
AIM: to explore and describe the student midwife's experiences in offering continuous labour support. DESIGN: a qualitative research design was chosen. Each student midwife offered continuous labour support to five women/couples and wrote narratives about each of these occasions. Written narratives from 11 student midwives were analysed using qualitative content analysis. FINDINGS: when student midwives offer continuous labour support to women/couples, they try to establish rapport. When this works, their presence, their sense of confidence and their ability to offer reassurance increase. If establishing rapport does not work, students experience a sense of powerlessness, a need for reassurance and a lack of confidence. KEY CONCLUSIONS: offering continuous labour support to women and/or their partners made the students aware of the importance of establishing rapport, and it made them realise the impact that their mere presence in the room could have. The students had a need for reassurance which could hamper their efforts to establish rapport. Experiencing a lack of confidence made students focus more strongly on their clinical skills and on their perceived role as a student midwife. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: this study can initiate discussions about how student midwives learn to be supportive, as well as about the role models that students encounter during their clinical training in Sweden.
PubMed ID
17881100 View in PubMed
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An interprofessional education pilot program in maternity care: findings from an exploratory case study of undergraduate students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127906
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 May;26(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Filomena Meffe
Catherine Claire Moravac
Sherry Espin
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. filomena.meffe@utoronto.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 May;26(3):183-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interdisciplinary Studies
Interprofessional Relations
Learning
Maternal health services
Midwifery - education
Pilot Projects
Abstract
An interprofessional team of maternity care providers and academics developed a pilot interprofessional education (IPE) program in maternity care for undergraduate students in nursing, midwifery and medicine. There are few published studies examining IPE programs in maternity care, particularly at the undergraduate level, that examine long-term outcomes. This paper outlines findings from a case study that explored how participation in an IPE program in maternity care may enhance student knowledge, skills/attitudes, and may promote their collaborative behavior in the practice setting. The program was launched at a Canadian urban teaching hospital and consisted of six workshops and two clinical shadowing experiences. Twenty-five semi-structured, in-depth interviews were completed with nine participants at various time points up to 20 months post-program. Qualitative analysis of transcripts revealed the emergence of four themes: relationship-building, confident communication, willingness to collaborate and woman/family-centered care. Participant statements about their intentions to continue practicing interprofessional collaboration more than a year post-program lend support to its sustained effectiveness. The provision of a safe learning environment, the use of small group learning techniques with mixed teaching strategies, augmented by exposure to an interprofessional faculty, contributed to the program's perceived success.
PubMed ID
22251306 View in PubMed
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[Aspects of present-day maternity care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245221
Source
Katilolehti. 1980 Dec;85(12):404-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
E L Vakkilainen
Source
Katilolehti. 1980 Dec;85(12):404-5
Date
Dec-1980
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland
Humans
Maternal health services
Midwifery - education
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
6907509 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of midwifery routines. Toward a north/south collaborative effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59792
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1991;7(4):500-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
G. Sterky
A B Ransjö-Arvidson
Author Affiliation
IHCAR, Karolinska Institute.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1991;7(4):500-8
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
International Cooperation
Midwifery - education - methods
Postnatal Care
Prenatal Care
Sweden
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Zambia
Abstract
Cooperation in midwifery research between Zambia and Sweden is ongoing. Joint studies on gastric suctioning and maternity routines are used as examples, and breastfeeding is discussed from a global perspective. The midwife, who also interprets responses from mothers, is an important member of an assessment team. Cooperation over cultural boundaries is feasible and mutually rewarding.
PubMed ID
1778696 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Jordemodern. 1985 Jul-Aug;98(7-8):242-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Boström
Source
Jordemodern. 1985 Jul-Aug;98(7-8):242-5
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Midwifery - education
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
3851802 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beliefs and practices of Ontario midwives about influenza immunization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176295
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Feb 18;23(13):1574-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2005
Author
Todd Lee
Refik Saskin
Margaret McArthur
Allison McGeer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, 600 University Avenue, Room 1460, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X5.
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Feb 18;23(13):1574-8
Date
Feb-18-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Culture
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Immunization - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Influenza Vaccines - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Midwifery - education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Abstract
With an increasing number of births in Ontario being conducted by midwives, we undertook a survey of the beliefs and practices of 256 licensed Ontario midwives and student midwives about immunization, particularly against influenza. Overall, 42.9% (48/112) of midwives considered that they knew a lot about immunization; however, 36.2% (38/105) reported no education about immunization during their training. A small majority (55.9%) were in favour of vaccination in general and only 2 of 113 reported spending more than 1h discussing vaccination with their clients. Only 26.9% reported having received influenza vaccine in the previous season (compared to 60% of all health care workers in Ontario). Overall, only 37% believed that influenza vaccine is effective, and 22% believed that the vaccine was a greater risk than influenza. Graduation in 1998 or prior was associated with belief in the effectiveness in vaccine, having been vaccinated, and recommending vaccine to clients. Midwives who reported being immunized themselves were more likely to believe in the safety and efficacy of influenza vaccine, and to recommend vaccination to their clients (26% versus 3%, p=0.001). If greater attention is not focused on promoting the utility of immunization to midwives, the success of population immunization programs may be compromised.
PubMed ID
15694509 View in PubMed
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Best practices in intercultural health: five case studies in Latin America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161535
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2007;3:31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Javier Mignone
Judith Bartlett
John O'Neil
Treena Orchard
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Social Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba, 307 Human Ecology Bldg,, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2, Canada. mignonej@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2007;3:31
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Benchmarking
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Latin America
Medicine, Traditional
Midwifery - education - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Organizational Case Studies
Pregnancy
Primary Health Care
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
The practice of integrating western and traditional indigenous medicine is fast becoming an accepted and more widely used approach in health care systems throughout the world. However, debates about intercultural health approaches have raised significant concerns. This paper reports findings of five case studies on intercultural health in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Suriname. It presents summary information on each case study, comparatively analyzes the initiatives following four main analytical themes, and examines the case studies against a series of the best practice criteria.
Notes
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 2001 Jan-Feb;43(1):41-5111270283
Cites: J Community Health. 2001 Apr;26(2):133-4711322753
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2001 Sep;16(3):221-3011527862
Cites: J Altern Complement Med. 2003 Apr;9(2):321-912804085
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 3;367(9525):1859-6916753489
Cites: Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1982;16(3):242-547171890
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1983;17(17):1249-556635699
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1983;17(17):1291-86635703
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Feb;28(1):10-810195658
Cites: Health Policy. 2004 May;68(2):129-4215063014
PubMed ID
17803820 View in PubMed
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73 records – page 1 of 8.