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610 records – page 1 of 61.

[4 generations of different deliveries--only women around greatgrandmother]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60128
Source
Vardfacket. 1987 Apr 28;11(8):32-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-1987

The acceptability and feasibility of an intercultural birth center in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114720
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kathryn Tucker
Hector Ochoa
Rosario Garcia
Kirsty Sievwright
Amy Chambliss
Margaret C Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, NHS, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Birthing Centers - utilization
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Home Childbirth
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Mexico
Midwifery - education - standards
Patient Preference - ethnology
Pregnancy
Abstract
An intercultural birthing house was established in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, as an intervention to reduce maternal mortality among indigenous women. This birth center, known locally as the Casa Materna, is a place where women can come to give birth with their traditional birth attendant. However, three months after opening, no woman had used the birthing house.
This study reports on the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to childbirth and use of the Casa Materna from the perspective of the health workers, traditional birth attendants and the program's target population. Structured interviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with participants from each of these groups. Data was searched for emerging themes and coded.
Findings show that the potential success of this program is jeopardized by lack of transport and a strong cultural preference for home births. The paper highlights the importance of community participation in planning and implementing such an intervention and of establishing trust and mutual respect among key actors. Recommendations are provided for moving forward the maternal health agenda of indigenous women in Chiapas.
Notes
Cites: J Sex Res. 2002 Feb;39(1):58-6212476258
Cites: Midwifery. 2004 Sep;20(3):217-2515337277
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 2004 Sep-Oct;46(5):388-9815521523
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(4):785-9515950091
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 3;367(9525):1859-6916753489
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Sep 30;368(9542):1189-20017011946
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2007;3:3117803820
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Mar;66(5):1057-6918187246
Cites: Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2008 Aug;24(2):75-8419062598
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Aug;25(4):411-2118053623
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2011 Nov;26(6):496-50721278371
PubMed ID
23587122 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Jordemodern. 1988 Jun;101(6):205-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
G. Fridman
Source
Jordemodern. 1988 Jun;101(6):205-10
Date
Jun-1988
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Female
Humans
India
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration
Midwifery
Pregnancy
Rural Population
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
A report is given of a visit to an Indian village community project which is supported by a small Swedish foundation. The project was started about 40 years ago by a female relative of Mahatma Gandhi. The community is a small village of about 2000 inhabitants and consists of an irrigated agricultural project, a school through 10th grade, a small hospital, a home for 140 poor or orphan girls and a nursery. The program employs 12 community health workers who have some healthcare training. Each worker cares for 200-250 households and usually knows his/her families well. Primary emphasis is on care of children which includes help with nutrition and a vaccination program. For every 4 community health workers there is an auxiliary nurse midwife who has 3 years special training following 10th grade. The midwives check up on pregnant women once a month through the 7th month, 2 visits in the 8th month and once/week in the 9th month. Undernourishment and anemia are the most common problems of pregnancy. Children are often born in the parents' home without any trained obstetric help. In spite of this, maternal mortality is very low. Even infection from childbirth is extremely rare. The visitor was particularly impressed by the respect and affection everyone in the village showed for children and for each other.
PubMed ID
3391830 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A court case from 1825. Women in confinement and midwives in prisoner's dock]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64990
Source
Fag Tidsskr Sykepleien. 1992 Feb 17;80(1):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-1992
Author
B. Seland
Source
Fag Tidsskr Sykepleien. 1992 Feb 17;80(1):15-8
Date
Feb-17-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
History, 19th Century
Humans
Jurisprudence - history
Midwifery - history
Norway
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
1596409 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Aug 14;74(13):21-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-1987
Author
K. Foss
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Aug 14;74(13):21-3
Date
Aug-14-1987
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Health Services - trends
Midwifery - trends
Norway
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
3438832 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Address by the Minister of Health and Welfare].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247353
Source
Katilolehti. 1979 Apr;84(4):179-82, 195
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1979
Author
P. Työläjärvi
Source
Katilolehti. 1979 Apr;84(4):179-82, 195
Date
Apr-1979
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Midwifery
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
255690 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A description of a Swedish midwifery work environment in an assistance project in West africa]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36881
Source
Jordemodern. 1992 Jan-Feb;105(1-2):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Adolfsson
Source
Jordemodern. 1992 Jan-Feb;105(1-2):20-3
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa, Western
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Midwifery
Pregnancy
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The routine daily consultation in the health post of 1 of 10 project villages for pregnant women and children under age 5 is interrupted by a call to an emergency delivery which ends up with the birth of a baby girl weighing 2100 g who is named after the author. Under the project funded by SIDA, Stockholm, a local village committee was elected to open a dispensary which became well-attended. Due to visits to another nearby village, the number of children checked increased to 263 instead of the previous number of 147 per month. The weight status of children was worsening despite vaccination and nutritional advice, because women worked in the fields without taking a meal break for their children. After advising that several meals a day were needed, the children gained weight in the following months. A lecture by the project doctor to representatives of surrounding villages about the safety of delivery in the dispensary or the hospital elicited a positive response to send pregnant women there for delivery. The number of institutional deliveries had already increased from 249 in 1986 to 433 in 1989. Working in a developing country required preliminary preparations, French and English language study, a 4-week cultural orientation course organized by the International Child Health Unit, and reading professional books on obstetrics and gynecology in such countries.
PubMed ID
1544861 View in PubMed
Less detail

[AIDS--not merely a case for the dedicated]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8760
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 Aug 15;73(13):27-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1986
Author
C. Almedal
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 Aug 15;73(13):27-8
Date
Aug-15-1986
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - nursing - prevention & control
Community Health Nursing
Humans
Midwifery
Norway
PubMed ID
3641438 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ALARM course: 10 years of continuing professional development in intrapartum care and risk management in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167875
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2006 Jul;28(7):600-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006

610 records – page 1 of 61.