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Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' low-carbohydrate-density diets are related to poorer dietary intakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172239
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Linda S Greene-Finestone
M Karen Campbell
Susan E Evers
Iris A Gutmanis
Author Affiliation
Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Linda_Greene-Finestone@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Nov;105(11):1783-8
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Child
Cluster analysis
Confidence Intervals
Diet - standards
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutritive Value
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
This study was undertaken to assess how low-carbohydrate-density diets below the acceptable macronutrient distribution range relate to food and micronutrient intake and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. The multistage stratified cluster design in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey was used. There were 5,194 subjects, 12 to 18 years of age, in sampled households. Dietary data were collected via a food frequency questionnaire. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were consumed by 27.6% of males and 24.1% of females. Low-carbohydrate-density diets were related (P
PubMed ID
16256764 View in PubMed
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Assessment of supplement use (including vitamin D) in Inuvialuit adults in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118581
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013 Apr;26(2):169-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
S K Kozicky
N. Mathe
J L Butler
T M Hébert
A. Corriveau
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2013 Apr;26(2):169-74
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Inuvialuit of Arctic Canada are at high risk for inadequate vitamin D status as a result of rapid dietary transitions and a lack of solar ultraviolet B exposure. This may have implications for the development of adverse skeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Data are limited regarding supplement use in Arctic Aboriginal populations. The present study aimed to describe the type and extent of supplement use, emphasising vitamin D, and to identify differences between supplement users and non-users.
Supplement information was collected from a population-specific quantitative food frequency questionnaire in three communities in the Northwest Territories, Canada, as part of a cross-sectional study. Data were analysed for frequency of supplementation and types of supplements. Users and non-users were compared in terms of age, sex, body mass index, education, marital status, income support, employment and chronic disease diagnosis using nonparametric tests and the chi-squared test.
Response rates ranged from 65% to 85%. Included in the analysis were 192 Inuvialuit (45 males, 147 females) with a mean (SD) age of 43.6 (13.9)?years. Twenty-three percent reported using a supplement, with multivitamins being the most common. Three percent indicated taking a vitamin D-containing supplement. No significant differences between supplement users and non-users were found.
Despite limited sun exposure for many months of the year, a small proportion of Inuvialuit adults were using supplements, and specifically vitamin D-containing supplements. Future population-based intervention strategies should promote consumption of vitamin D rich foods and encourage the use of vitamin D supplements if diet alone is unable to meet recommendations.
PubMed ID
23190418 View in PubMed
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[Characteristic of nutrition for young sportsmen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146422
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2010;79(6):69-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010

A comparison of micronutrient inadequacy and risk of high micronutrient intakes among vitamin and mineral supplement users and nonusers in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127396
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):534-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Yaseer A Shakur
Valerie Tarasuk
Paul Corey
Deborah L O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Mar;142(3):534-40
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Eating
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage - adverse effects - deficiency
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Young Adult
Abstract
Although supplement use is prevalent in North America, there is little information on how supplements affect the prevalence of nutrient adequacy or risk of intakes greater than the tolerable upper intake level (UL). The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of nutrient adequacy and percent of intakes greater than the UL from diet alone between supplement users and nonusers and determine the contribution of supplements to nutrient intakes. Dietary intakes (24-h recall) and supplement use (previous 30 d) from respondents =1 y in the Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2 (n = 34,381) were used to estimate the prevalence of nutrient adequacy and intakes greater than the UL. Software for Intake Distribution Evaluation was used to estimate usual intakes. The prevalence of nutrient adequacy from diet alone was not significantly higher among supplement users than nonusers for any nutrient. Based on diet alone, children 1-13 y had a low prevalence of nutrient adequacy (30%. For other nutrients, there was a low prevalence of nutrient adequacy. There were no nutrient intakes greater than the UL from diet alone, except zinc in children. When supplements were included, =10% of users in some age/sex groups had intakes of vitamins A and C, niacin, folic acid, iron, zinc, and magnesium greater than the UL, reaching >80% for vitamin A and niacin in children. In conclusion, from diet alone, the prevalence of nutrient adequacy was low for most nutrients except for calcium, magnesium, and vitamins A and D. For most nutrients, supplement users were not at greater risk of inadequacy than nonusers; supplement use sometimes led to intakes greater than the UL.
PubMed ID
22298574 View in PubMed
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Compliance to micronutrient supplementation in children 3 to 24 months of age from a semi-rural community in Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120373
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2012 Oct;54(5):470-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Fernando López-Flores
Lynnette Marie Neufeld
Daniela Sotres-Álvarez
Armando García-Guerra
Usha Ramakrishnan
Author Affiliation
Secretaría de Salud de Nayarit, Tepic, Nayarit, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2012 Oct;54(5):470-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Breast Feeding
Cough - epidemiology
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Educational Status
Female
Fever - epidemiology
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant Food
Iron - administration & dosage
Male
Medication Adherence - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Mexico
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Abstract
To identify associated factors to compliance for multiple micronutrient (MM) or iron and vitamin A (IVITA) supplementation, in children (3 to 24 months old).
A database (n=465 children) from a randomized, controlled, clinical trial, carried out in a semi-rural setting in Mexico, was analyzed. The compliance rate of MM and IVITA supplements was calculated. Adequate compliance rate (AC>80%), and its association with children and households characteristics, was determined.
The compliance mean was high (MM:78.2%, IVITA:80.1%; p
PubMed ID
23011498 View in PubMed
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Consumption of breakfast and the type of breakfast consumed are positively associated with nutrient intakes and adequacy of Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118746
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):86-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Susan I Barr
Loretta DiFrancesco
Victor L Fulgoni
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition and Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. susan.barr@ubc.ca.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Jan;143(1):86-92
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breakfast
Canada
Cereals - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Female
Food, Fortified - adverse effects
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Sex Characteristics
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have assessed the associations between breakfast intake and nutrient adequacy [where inadequacy reflects prevalence of usual intakes below the estimated average requirement (EAR) and potential excess reflects the prevalence above the tolerable upper intake level (UL)]. This study examined associations among breakfast, nutrient intakes, and nutrient adequacy in Canadian adults. Respondents aged =19 y in the Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2 (n = 19,913) were classified as breakfast nonconsumers (11%), ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) breakfast consumers (20%), or other breakfast consumers (69%). Nutrient intakes from food (24-h recall) and the prevalence of usual intakes below the EAR and above the UL from food alone and from food plus supplements were compared by breakfast group. Usual intake distributions were estimated using the National Cancer Institute method. Breakfast consumers, and to a greater extent RTEC breakfast consumers, had significantly higher intakes of fiber and several vitamins and minerals than breakfast nonconsumers. Compared with nonconsumers, RTEC and other breakfast consumers had significantly lower prevalences below the EARs for vitamin A and magnesium. The prevalences below the EARs of these nutrients and calcium, thiamin, vitamin D, and iron were significantly lower with RTEC breakfasts than with other breakfasts. Similar patterns were observed from food alone compared with food plus supplements. Breakfast consumption did not affect prevalence above the UL based on food sources, although based on food plus supplements, breakfast consumers had slightly higher proportions that were above the UL than nonconsumers for several nutrients. Breakfast, especially an RTEC breakfast, is associated with improved nutrient adequacy and does not meaningfully affect prevalence above the UL.
PubMed ID
23173176 View in PubMed
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Current micronutrient recommendations in Europe: towards understanding their differences and similarities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86135
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Apr;47 Suppl 1:17-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Doets Esmée L
de Wit Liesbeth S
Dhonukshe-Rutten Rosalie A M
Cavelaars Adriënne E J M
Raats Monique M
Timotijevic Lada
Brzozowska Anna
Wijnhoven Trudy M A
Pavlovic Mirjana
Totland Torunn Holm
Andersen Lene F
Ruprich Jiri
Pijls Loek T J
Ashwell Margaret
Lambert Janet P
van 't Veer Pieter
de Groot Lisette C P G M
Author Affiliation
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University and Research Centre, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV, Wageningen, The Netherlands. esmee.doets@wur.nl
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Apr;47 Suppl 1:17-40
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nowadays most countries in Europe have established their own nutrient recommendations to assess the adequacy of dietary intakes and to plan desirable dietary intakes. As yet there is no standard approach for deriving nutrient recommendations, they may vary from country to country. This results in different national recommendations causing confusion for policy-makers, health professionals, industry, and consumers within Europe. EURRECA (EURopean micronutrient RECommendations Aligned) is a network of excellence funded by the European Commission (EC), and established to identify and address the problem of differences between countries in micronutrient recommendations. The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the available micronutrient recommendations in Europe, and to provide information on their origin, concepts and definitions. Furthermore this paper aims to illustrate the diversity in European recommendations on vitamin A and vitamin D, and to explore differences and commonalities in approaches that could possibly explain variations observed. METHODS: A questionnaire was developed to get information on the process of establishing micronutrient recommendations. These questionnaires were sent to key informants in the field of micronutrient recommendations to cover all European countries/regions. Also the latest reports on nutrient recommendations in Europe were collected. Standardisation procedures were defined to enable comparison of the recommendations. Recommendations for vitamin A and vitamin D were compared per sex at the ages 3, 9 months and 5, 10, 15, 25, 50 and 70 years. Information extracted from the questionnaires and reports was compared focusing on: (1) The concept of recommendation (recommended daily allowance (RDA), adequate intake (AI) or acceptable range), (2) The year of publication of the report (proxy for available evidence), (3) Population groups defined, (4) Other methodological issues such as selected criteria of adequacy, the type of evidence used, and assumptions made. RESULTS: Twenty-two countries, the World Health Organization (WHO)/the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the EC have their own reports on nutrient recommendations. Thirteen countries based their micronutrient recommendations on those from other countries or organisations. Five countries, WHO/FAO and the EC defined their own recommendations. The DACH-countries (Germany, Austria and Switzerland) as well as the Nordic countries (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland) cooperated in setting recommendations. Greece and Portugal use the EC and the WHO/FAO recommendations, respectively and Slovenia adopted the recommendations from the DACH-countries. Rather than by concepts, definitions, and defined population groups, variability appears to emerge from differences in criteria for adequacy, assumptions made and type of evidence used to establish micronutrient recommendations. DISCUSSION: The large variation in current micronutrient recommendations for population groups as illustrated for vitamin A and vitamin D strengthens the need for guidance on setting evidence based, up-to-date European recommendations. Differences in endpoints, type of evidence used to set recommendations, experts' opinions and assumptions are all likely to contribute to the identified variation. So far, background information was not sufficient transparent to disentangle the relative contribution of these different aspects. CONCLUSION: EURRECA has an excellent opportunity to develop tools to improve transparency on the approaches used in setting micronutrient recommendations, including the selection of criteria for adequacy, weighing of evidence, and interpretation of data.
PubMed ID
18427858 View in PubMed
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Dairy foods are an important source of calcium and vitamin D among Canadian-born and Asian-born Chinese in Edmonton, Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125641
Source
Nutr Res. 2012 Mar;32(3):177-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Yan Han Yu
Anna Farmer
Diana R Mager
Noreen D Willows
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Nutr Res. 2012 Mar;32(3):177-84
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Animals
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Calcium - administration & dosage - deficiency
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
China
Dairy Products
Deficiency Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Diet - ethnology
Diet Records
Female
Fishes
Humans
Male
Meat
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Risk
Seafood
Soy Foods
Soybeans
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Low intakes of calcium and vitamin D increase the risk for osteoporosis, bone fracture, and other health problems. This study aimed to examine the calcium and vitamin D intakes of Canadian-born Chinese (CBC) and Asian-born Chinese (ABC) in Edmonton, Canada, and to identify usual food sources of these nutrients. We hypothesized that CBC would have higher intakes of calcium and vitamin D than ABC and that the food sources of these nutrients would differ by region of birth (Canada vs Asia). Two in-person multipass 24-hour dietary recalls were administered for 1 weekday and weekend day for 81 healthy ethnically Chinese aged 18 to 58 years. The risks for calcium and vitamin D inadequacy were calculated as were the contributions of specific foods to calcium and vitamin D intakes. Calcium intake was 781 ± 337 mg/d for CBC and 809 ± 369 mg/d for ABC (P = .737). Vitamin D intake was 3.8 ± 3.4 µg/d for CBC and 5.0 ± 3.9 µg/d for ABC (P = .158). Respective risks for calcium and vitamin D inadequacy were 36% and 98% for men and 78% and 100% for women. Dairy contributed most to the calcium (43%) and vitamin D (52%) intake of participants. For ABC, soybean products contributed to 8.1% of calcium, whereas fatty fish contributed to 16.7% of vitamin D. For CBC, red meats contributed to 11.1% of vitamin D. Dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D need to be increased in Chinese Canadians through the promotion of dairy and culturally relevant sources of these nutrients.
PubMed ID
22464804 View in PubMed
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Determinants of diet quality among Canadian adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150393
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kate E Storey
Rhona M Hanning
Irene A Lambraki
Pete Driezen
Shawn N Fraser
Linda J McCargar
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):58-65
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Alberta
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritive Value
Ontario
Abstract
Dietary intakes and nutrition behaviours were examined among different diet quality groups of Canadian adolescents.
This cross-sectional study included 2850 Alberta and Ontario adolescents aged 14 to 17, who completed a self-administered web-based survey that examined nutrient intakes and meal behaviours (meal frequency and meal consumption away from home).
Mean macronutrient intakes were within Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges; however, micronutrient intakes and median food group intakes were below recommendations based on Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating (CFGHE). Overall diet quality indicated that 43%, 47%, and 10% of students had poor, average, and superior diet quality, respectively. Adolescents with lower diet quality had significantly different intakes of macronutrients and CFGHE-defined "other foods." In terms of diet quality determinants, those with poor diet quality had higher frequencies of suboptimal meal behaviours. Students with poor diet quality consumed breakfast and lunch less frequently than did those with average and superior diet quality.
Canadian adolescents have low intakes of CFGHE-recommended foods and high intakes of "other foods." Those with poor diet quality had suboptimal macro-nutrient intakes and increased meal skipping and meal consumption away from home. Adherence to CFGHE may promote optimal dietary intakes and improve nutritional behaviours.
PubMed ID
19515268 View in PubMed
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62 records – page 1 of 7.