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Antimicrobial drug use in the first decade of life influences saliva microbiota diversity and composition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311272
Source
Microbiome. 2020 08 21; 8(1):121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Video-Audio Media
Date
08-21-2020
Author
Sajan C Raju
Heli Viljakainen
Rejane A O Figueiredo
Pertti J Neuvonen
Johan G Eriksson
Elisabete Weiderpass
Trine B Rounge
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Research Center, Topeliuksenkatu 20, 00250, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Microbiome. 2020 08 21; 8(1):121
Date
08-21-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Microbiota - drug effects - genetics
Prospective Studies
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Saliva - drug effects - microbiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The human microbiota contributes to health and well-being. Antimicrobials (AM) have an immediate effect on microbial diversity and composition in the gut, but next to nothing is known about their long-term contribution to saliva microbiota. Our objectives were to investigate the long-term impact of AM use on saliva microbiota diversity and composition in preadolescents. We compared the lifetime effects by gender and AMs. We used data from 808 randomly selected children in the Finnish Health In Teens (Fin-HIT) cohort with register-based data on AM purchases from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. Saliva microbiota was assessed with 16S rRNA (V3-V4) sequencing. The sequences were aligned to the SILVA ribosomal RNA database and classified and counted using the mothur pipeline. Associations between AM use and alpha-diversity (Shannon index) were identified with linear regression, while associations between beta-diversity (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity) and low, medium or high AM use were identified with PERMANOVA.
Of the children, 53.6% were girls and their mean age was 11.7 (0.4) years. On average, the children had 7.4 (ranging from 0 to 41) AM prescriptions during their lifespan. The four most commonly used AMs were amoxicillin (n = 2622, 43.7%), azithromycin (n = 1495, 24.9%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (n = 1123, 18.7%) and phenoxymethylpenicillin (n = 408, 6.8%). A linear inverse association was observed between the use of azithromycin and Shannon index (b -?0.015, p value = 0.002) in all children, the effect was driven by girls (b -?0.032, p value = 0.001), while not present in boys. Dissimilarities were marked between high, medium and low users of all AMs combined, in azithromycin users specifically, and in boys with amoxicillin use. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate use was associated with the largest decrease in abundance of Rikenellaceae. AM use in general and phenoxymethylpenicillin specifically were associated with a decrease of Paludibacter and pathways related to amino acid degradations differed in proportion between high and low AM users.
A systematic approach utilising reliable registry data on lifetime use of AMs demonstrated long-term effects on saliva microbiota diversity and composition. These effects are gender- and AM-dependent. We found that frequent lifelong use of AMs shifts bacterial profiles years later, which might have unforeseen health impacts in the future. Our findings emphasise a concern for high azithromycin use, which substantially decreases bacterial diversity and affects composition as well. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical implications of our findings. Video Abstract.
PubMed ID
32825849 View in PubMed
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Defining the vulnerable period for re-establishment of Clostridium difficile colonization after treatment of C. difficile infection with oral vancomycin or metronidazole.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106853
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(10):e76269
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Turki Abujamel
Jennifer L Cadnum
Lucy A Jury
Venkata C K Sunkesula
Sirisha Kundrapu
Robin L Jump
Alain C Stintzi
Curtis J Donskey
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(10):e76269
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clostridium Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Clostridium difficile - classification - drug effects - genetics
Diarrhea - drug therapy - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Feces - microbiology
Female
Humans
Male
Metronidazole - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Microbiota - drug effects
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Vancomycin - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is the most common cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea in developed countries. A significant proportion of patients receiving oral vancomycin or metronidazole for treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) develop recurrences. However, the period of vulnerability to re-establishment of colonization by C. difficile after therapy is not well defined.
In a prospective study of CDI patients, we demonstrated that most vancomycin-treated patients maintained inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin in stool for 4 to 5 days after therapy, whereas metronidazole was only detectable during therapy. From the time of elimination of the antibiotics to 14 to 21 days after therapy, a majority of stool suspensions supported growth of C. difficile and deep 16S rRNA sequencing demonstrated persistent marked alteration of the indigenous microbiota. By 21 to 28 days after completion of CDI treatment, a majority of stool suspensions inhibited growth of C. difficile and there was evidence of some recovery of the microbiota.
These data demonstrate that there is a vulnerable period for re-establishment of C. difficile colonization after CDI treatment that begins within a few days after discontinuation of treatment and extends for about 3 weeks in most patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24098459 View in PubMed
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Environmental characteristics of a tundra river system in Svalbard. Part 2: Chemical stress factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298558
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 25; 653:1585-1596
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-25-2019
Author
Klaudia Kosek
Krystyna Koziol
Aneta Luczkiewicz
Katarzyna Jankowska
Stanislaw Chmiel
Zaneta Polkowska
Author Affiliation
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., Gdansk 80-233, Poland.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 25; 653:1585-1596
Date
Feb-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - drug effects
Environmental monitoring
Formaldehyde - analysis
Metagenomics
Metals - analysis
Microbiota - drug effects
Phenols - analysis
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Rivers - chemistry - microbiology
Svalbard
Tundra
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Bacterial communities in the Arctic environment are subject to multiple stress factors, including contaminants, although typically their concentrations are small. The Arctic contamination research has focused on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) because they are bioaccumulative, resistant to degradation and toxic for all organisms. Pollutants have entered the Arctic predominantly by atmospheric and oceanic long-range transport, and this was facilitated by their volatile or semi-volatile properties, while their chemical stability extended their lifetimes following emission. Chemicals present in the Arctic at detectable and quantifiable concentrations testify to their global impact. Chemical contamination may induce serious disorders in the integrity of polar ecosystems influencing the growth of bacterial communities. In this study, the abundance and the types of bacteria in the Arctic freshwater were examined and the microbial characteristics were compared to the amount of potentially harmful chemical compounds in particular elements of the Arctic catchment. The highest concentrations of all determined PAHs were observed in two samples in the vicinity of the estuary both in June and September 2016 and were 1964?ng?L-1 (R12) and 3901?ng?L-1 (R13) in June, and 2179?ng?L-1 (R12) and 1349?ng?L-1 (R13) in September. Remarkable concentrations of the sum of phenols and formaldehyde were detected also at the outflow of the Revelva river into the sea (R12) and were 0.24?mg?L-1 in June and 0.35?mg?L-1 in September 2016. The elevated concentrations of chemical compounds near the estuary suggest a potential impact of the water from the lower tributaries (including the glacier-fed stream measured at R13) or the sea currents and the sea aerosol as pollutant sources. The POPs' degradation at low temperature is not well understood but bacteria capable to degrading such compounds were noted in each sampling point.
PubMed ID
30446169 View in PubMed
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Role of the intestinal microbiota in resistance to colonization by Clostridium difficile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105040
Source
Gastroenterology. 2014 May;146(6):1547-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Robert A Britton
Vincent B Young
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.
Source
Gastroenterology. 2014 May;146(6):1547-53
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Bile Acids and Salts - metabolism
Biological Therapy - methods
Clostridium difficile - growth & development - metabolism - pathogenicity
Disease Models, Animal
Dysbiosis
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - metabolism - microbiology - prevention & control
Feces - microbiology
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Humans
Intestines - drug effects - metabolism - microbiology
Microbiota - drug effects
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Antibiotic-associated infection with the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and increased health care costs. C difficile infection follows disruption of the indigenous gut microbiota by antibiotics. Antibiotics create an environment within the intestine that promotes C difficile spore germination, vegetative growth, and toxin production, leading to epithelial damage and colitis. Studies of patients with C difficile infection and animal models have shown that the indigenous microbiota can inhibit expansion and persistence of C difficile. Although the specific mechanisms of these processes are not known, they are likely to interfere with key aspects of the pathogen's physiology, including spore germination and competitive growth. Increasing our understanding of how the intestinal microbiota manage C difficile could lead to better means of controlling this important nosocomial pathogen.
PubMed ID
24503131 View in PubMed
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Same Exposure but Two Radically Different Responses to Antibiotics: Resilience of the Salivary Microbiome versus Long-Term Microbial Shifts in Feces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275008
Source
MBio. 2015;6(6):e01693-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Egija Zaura
Bernd W Brandt
M Joost Teixeira de Mattos
Mark J Buijs
Martien P M Caspers
Mamun-Ur Rashid
Andrej Weintraub
Carl Erik Nord
Ann Savell
Yanmin Hu
Antony R Coates
Mike Hubank
David A Spratt
Michael Wilson
Bart J F Keijser
Wim Crielaard
Source
MBio. 2015;6(6):e01693-15
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Feces - microbiology
Great Britain
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Microbiota - drug effects
Placebos - administration & dosage
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Saliva - microbiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Due to the spread of resistance, antibiotic exposure receives increasing attention. Ecological consequences for the different niches of individual microbiomes are, however, largely ignored. Here, we report the effects of widely used antibiotics (clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin, and minocycline) with different modes of action on the ecology of both the gut and the oral microbiomes in 66 healthy adults from the United Kingdom and Sweden in a two-center randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. Feces and saliva were collected at baseline, immediately after exposure, and 1, 2, 4, and 12 months after administration of antibiotics or placebo. Sequences of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from all samples and metagenomic shotgun sequences from selected baseline and post-antibiotic-treatment sample pairs were analyzed. Additionally, metagenomic predictions based on 16S rRNA gene amplicon data were performed using PICRUSt. The salivary microbiome was found to be significantly more robust, whereas the antibiotics negatively affected the fecal microbiome: in particular, health-associated butyrate-producing species became strongly underrepresented. Additionally, exposure to different antibiotics enriched genes associated with antibiotic resistance. In conclusion, healthy individuals, exposed to a single antibiotic treatment, undergo considerable microbial shifts and enrichment in antibiotic resistance in their feces, while their salivary microbiome composition remains unexpectedly stable. The health-related consequences for the gut microbiome should increase the awareness of the individual risks involved with antibiotic use, especially in a (diseased) population with an already dysregulated microbiome. On the other hand, understanding the mechanisms behind the resilience of the oral microbiome toward ecological collapse might prove useful in combating microbial dysbiosis elsewhere in the body.
Many health care professionals use antibiotic prophylaxis strategies to prevent infection after surgery. This practice is under debate since it enhances the spread of antibiotic resistance. Another important reason to avoid nonessential use of antibiotics, the impact on our microbiome, has hardly received attention. In this study, we assessed the impact of antibiotics on the human microbial ecology at two niches. We followed the oral and gut microbiomes in 66 individuals from before, immediately after, and up to 12 months after exposure to different antibiotic classes. The salivary microbiome recovered quickly and was surprisingly robust toward antibiotic-induced disturbance. The fecal microbiome was severely affected by most antibiotics: for months, health-associated butyrate-producing species became strongly underrepresented. Additionally, there was an enrichment of genes associated with antibiotic resistance. Clearly, even a single antibiotic treatment in healthy individuals contributes to the risk of resistance development and leads to long-lasting detrimental shifts in the gut microbiome.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26556275 View in PubMed
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[THE SPECIES COMPOSITION OF AGENTS OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS OF URINARY TRACTS AND SENSITIVITY OF MAIN UROPATHOGENS TO ANTIBACTERIAL PREPARATIONS IN MOSCOW IN 2013].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270382
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2015 Oct;60(10):58-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
O Yu Filimonova
L G Stolyarova
S V Sidorenko
I M Rott
T I Lysenko
T V Narkhova
V A Dmitrieva
G I Golovenko
I V Vlasova
T B Safonova
L A Taranenko
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2015 Oct;60(10):58-61
Date
Oct-2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Microbiota - drug effects
Russia
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
The article presents the results of analysis of spectrum of agents of community-acquired infections of urinary tracts in Moscow The prevalence of resistance these infections to antibiotics applied in treatment of the mentioned pathology are considered.
PubMed ID
26841676 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.