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133 records – page 1 of 14.

[A comparison of the immune response induced by DNA or by an inactivated vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57514
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Morozova
R V Popova
T G Maksimova
E E Mitrofanova
V N Bakhvalova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - genetics - immunology - pathogenicity
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - immunology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
Glycoproteins - immunology
Immunization - methods
Lethal Dose 50
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Vaccines, DNA - immunology
Vaccines, Inactivated - immunology
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - immunology
Viral Structural Proteins - immunology
Viral Vaccines - immunology
Abstract
BALB/c mice were immunized with recombinant plasmid DNA pSVK3-ENS1 and pcDNAI-NS3 containing, respectively, genes E-NS1 and NS3 of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus. Antibodies to TBE virus proteins were detected in the blood sera of the immunized animals by the method of the enzyme immunoassay. Though the titers of virus-specific antibodies in the sera of mice immunized with protein vaccines exceeded those registered after immunization with DNA vaccines, essential protective immunity was observed after the use of both vaccines.
PubMed ID
10808575 View in PubMed
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[Age-related characteristics of contractile vascular reactions and the content of oxygen free radicals and nitric oxide metabolites in BALB/c mice in conditions of alienation zone]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83418
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(3):32-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Tkachenko M M
Sahach V F
Baziliuk O V
Kotsiuruba A V
Popereka H M
Stepanenko L H
Seniuk O F
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(3):32-41
Date
2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism - radiation effects
Animals
Aorta, Thoracic - metabolism - radiation effects
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Free Radicals - metabolism
Leukotriene C4 - metabolism
Lipid Peroxides - metabolism
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Muscle Contraction - drug effects
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular - metabolism - radiation effects
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Thromboxane B2 - metabolism
Abstract
Peculiarities of changes of the endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vascular reactions of relaxation, and the content of oxygen free radicals and stable metabolites of nitric oxide (NO) were studied in the aorta preparations of BALB/c mice of the two age groups (6 and 18 months), which were born and lived in the Chernobyl alienation zone. The results obtained showed no endothelium-dependent reactions of aortal smooth muscles relaxation to acetylcholine and only partially impaired endothelium-independent reactions to sodium nitroprusside in animals of both age groups. There was a significant decrease in the content of high-molecular nitrosothiols (HMNT) in old animals, which may signify a depletion of NO depot in the aorta. A decrease of HMNT levels induced an increase of the shares of anion nitrite and low-molecular nitrosothiols (LMNT) in the total amount of endogenous donors of NO in the aorta of old animals. Exposure of old animals to low doses of radiation resulted in an over 3-fold increase of LMNT. In old mice the levels of oxygen active forms, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals increase, while the level of H2O2 remained unchanged.
PubMed ID
16108223 View in PubMed
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Ag-specific recognition, activation, and effector function of T cells in the conjunctiva with experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50675
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2003 Oct;44(10):4366-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Atsuki Fukushima
Akemi Ozaki
Kazuyo Fukata
Waka Ishida
Hisayuki Ueno
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku City, Japan. fukusima@kochi-ms.ac.jp
Source
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2003 Oct;44(10):4366-74
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blepharitis - immunology
Blotting, Western
Chemokines - metabolism
Conjunctiva - immunology
Conjunctivitis - immunology
Cytokines - metabolism
Epitopes - immunology
Flow Cytometry
Fluoresceins
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunophenotyping
Lymphocyte Activation - physiology
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Receptors, Chemokine - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Succinimides
T-Lymphocytes - physiology
Abstract
PURPOSE. To investigate antigen (Ag) specificity, activation, and effector function of the Ag-specific T cells involved in the development of experimental immune-mediated blepharoconjunctivitis (EC), an experimental conjunctivitis. METHODS. EC was induced in Brown Norway rats by injection of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells followed by OVA challenge with eye drops. Eyes, including the conjunctivas, were harvested at different time points after challenge. The dependence of EC onset on the challenging Ag was assessed by challenge with an irrelevant Ag or stimulatory OVA peptides. To show the infiltration of transferred T cells into the conjunctiva, T cells were labeled with 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) before transfer. The activation of T cells in the conjunctiva was assessed by measuring phosphorylation of Lck-associated molecules by Western blot analysis. Conjunctivas were also examined by immunohistochemistry and used for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to determine the phenotype of the infiltrating cells and cytokine, chemokine, and chemokine receptor expression. To investigate infiltration of non Ag-specific T cells into the conjunctiva, ragweed (RW)-primed lymphocytes were transferred into OVA-specific T-cell receptor transgenic (DO11.10) mice. The mice were then challenged with RW and the conjunctivas were harvested for immunohistochemistry to detect T cells derived from DO11.10 mice. RESULTS. EC was induced only when challenged with OVA protein or stimulatory OVA peptides, and CFSE-labeled transferred cells were found in the conjunctiva. Phosphorylation of Lck and an 85-kDa Lck-associated molecule were observed in the conjunctiva 6 hours after challenge. Many cytokines and chemokines began to be expressed at 6 hours, and individual expression patterns over time correlated well with the infiltration patterns of different inflammatory cells. In DO11.10 mice that received RW-primed lymphocytes, T cells derived from the recipient mice infiltrated the conjunctiva after RW challenge. CONCLUSIONS. Ag-specific T cells initiate EC by first infiltrating the conjunctiva, where they become activated by the specific Ag in the conjunctiva.
PubMed ID
14507881 View in PubMed
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Allergenic and immunogenic components of house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3845
Source
Ann Allergy. 1986 Feb;56(2):150-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986
Author
S. Nakada
M. Haida
T. Nakagawa
K. Ito
T. Miyamoto
Source
Ann Allergy. 1986 Feb;56(2):150-5
Date
Feb-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens
Animals
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - analysis
Asthma - blood - immunology
Chromatography, Gel
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mites - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Tests
Tissue Extracts - isolation & purification
Abstract
The house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae, was fractionated by a Sephadex G-200 column. Its allergenic (IgE-reacting) and immunogenic (IgG-reacting) components were investigated. By means of skin test, the molecular weight (MW) of major allergenic components of mite was found to be approximately 9,000 to 21,000 daltons. Immunogenic components were investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using each fraction as an antigen and mice plasma and human serum as antibodies. With mouse plasma, high IgG antibody titers were observed in fractions that contained the part of the mite with high MW (greater than 150,000). With human sera, high IgG antibody titers were observed in fractions that contained the part of the mite with MW more than 30,000. Heterogeneity of human IgG antibody responses against mite antigen was also suggested.
PubMed ID
3484919 View in PubMed
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Analysis of immunogenic properties of nonapeptide TVGRGDPHQ from Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57705
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1994 Mar-Apr;66(2):90-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
E M Kavoon
E G Pkhakadze
A V Marinets
V A Chechot
J L Radavsky
S V Komissarenko
Author Affiliation
A.V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1994 Mar-Apr;66(2):90-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antibody Specificity
Bordetella pertussis - chemistry
Cross Reactions
Hemagglutinins
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mice, Inbred CBA
Molecular Sequence Data
Oligopeptides - chemistry - immunology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - chemistry
Abstract
Immunogenic properties of TVGRGDPHQ nonapeptide which is correspondent to the region 1094-1102 of B. pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) were studied. The conjugate of bovine serum albumin with nonapeptide was used for immunization of BALB/c and CBA mice. Antisera of the both lines of mice cross-reacted with a number of antigens, but using affinity chromatography peptide and FHA specific antibodies were extracted. Affinity purified rabbit antibodies to TVGRGPHQ which recognize FHA were also obtained. Therefore the antibodies to the peptide which placed RGD-containing region responsible for macrophage CR3-integrin interaction are capable to distinguish the native antigen. Thus these data are an additional evidence for the nonapeptide use as a component of synthetic vaccine against whooping-cough.
PubMed ID
7998347 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the role of the indigenous microbiota in cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108188
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e70657
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jacqueline J Fremont-Rahl
Zhongming Ge
Carlos Umana
Mark T Whary
Nancy S Taylor
Sureshkumar Muthupalani
Martin C Carey
James G Fox
Kirk J Maurer
Author Affiliation
Division of Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e70657
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Bile - chemistry
Cholelithiasis - etiology
Cholesterol - chemistry
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Gallstones - chemistry - etiology
Gastrointestinal Tract - microbiology
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Microbiota
Mucins - genetics - metabolism
Phenotype
Prevalence
Abstract
Cholesterol gallstone disease is a complex process involving both genetic and environmental variables. No information exists regarding what role if any the indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota may play in cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis and whether variations in the microbiota can alter cholesterol gallstone prevalence rates.
Genetically related substrains (BALB/cJ and BALB/cJBomTac) and (BALB/AnNTac and BALB/cByJ) of mice obtained from different vendors were compared for cholesterol gallstone prevalence after being fed a lithogenic diet for 8 weeks. The indigenous microbiome was altered in these substrains by oral gavage of fecal slurries as adults, by cross-fostering to mice with divergent flora at
Notes
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PubMed ID
23923015 View in PubMed
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An antigen related to the phenotype of multi-drug resistance can be induced in vivo and used as a target for immunotherapy of rat leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26677
Source
Leuk Res. 1985;9(8):987-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
A. Brox
G. Price
A K Sullivan
Source
Leuk Res. 1985;9(8):987-92
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Neoplasm - biosynthesis
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic
Daunorubicin - therapeutic use
Disease Models, Animal
Drug resistance
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Immunization
Immunotherapy
Leukemia, Experimental - therapy
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surface Properties
Time Factors
Abstract
Several laboratories have reported that new plasma membrane peptides appear in rodent and human cells after induction of in-vitro resistance to vinca alkaloids, anthracyclines and other anti-neoplastic drugs. Recently, murine monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize surface components of such drug-resistant cells. The work presented here describes the development of an in-vivo animal model of this phenomenon using a rat myeloid leukemia. Brown Norway rats were made leukemic with promyelocytes of the BNML line and subsequently were treated with 7.7 mg kg-1 of daunorubicin. After eight cycles of passage-treatment-regrowth, the resulting cells reacted with this antibody in immunofluorescence and cytotoxicity assays. Animals injected with cells that had been pre-incubated with antibody in the absence of complement survived significantly longer than did the controls. Further prolongation of survival occurred when the cells were treated with a second antibody of a different specificity. These results demonstrate that some of the changes associated with in-vitro drug resistance occur also in vivo and potentially may be exploited as a focus for immunotherapy.
PubMed ID
3900592 View in PubMed
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Antibodies raised in animals against the Streptococcus agalactiae proteins c alpha and R4 and normal human serum antibodies target distinct epitopes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9738
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2003 May;52(Pt 5):379-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Sylvester R Moyo
Johan A Maeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zimbabwe Medical School, PO Box A178, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2003 May;52(Pt 5):379-83
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis - blood - immunology
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Antibody Specificity
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Bacterial Proteins - immunology
Blotting, Western
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epitopes - immunology
Female
Heat
Humans
Immune Sera - immunology
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - immunology
Protein Denaturation
Rabbits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate - chemistry
Streptococcal Infections - immunology
Streptococcus agalactiae - immunology
Zimbabwe
Abstract
The targets for normal human serum antibodies that react with proteins c(alpha) and R4 isolated from group B streptococci (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) have been studied and compared with the targets for murine monoclonal and rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against these proteins. The proteins were extracted by trypsin digestion and purified by precipitations and gel filtration and testing was based on enzyme immunoassays. The immune antibodies showed specificity for the corresponding protein, targeted that protein in Western blotting and recognized their targets after heat treatment (100 degrees C) of the proteins. Human antibodies in a commercial gammaglobulin preparation targeted a site(s) common to c(alpha) and R4. This target failed to bind the antibodies in Western blotting and was destroyed by heating. c(alpha)- and R4-reactive antibodies in sera from healthy pregnant women recognized the common, heat-labile determinant(s), but contained little or no antibodies against the heat-stable c(alpha)- or R4-specific determinants. These results are consistent with the notions that (i) the normal human antibodies and the immunization-induced animal antibodies targeted different sites on the c(alpha) and R4 proteins and that (ii) the natural human antibodies targeted conformational epitopes and the immune antibodies targeted linear epitopes. These findings are important for further clarification of GBS immunology and immunoprotection in humans.
PubMed ID
12721312 View in PubMed
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Anticoagulant activity of fucoidan from brown algae Fucus evanescens of the Okhotsk Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181491
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Nov;136(5):471-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
T A Kuznetsova
N N Besednova
A N Mamaev
A P Momot
N M Shevchenko
T N Zvyagintseva
Author Affiliation
Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia. kuznetsov@stl.ru.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Nov;136(5):471-3
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anticoagulants - chemistry - pharmacology
Blood Coagulation Tests
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Fucus - chemistry
Heparin - pharmacology
Humans
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Oceans and Seas
Polysaccharides - chemistry - pharmacology
Russia
Time Factors
Abstract
In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that anticoagulant activity of sulfated polysaccharide from Fucus evanescens (brown algae of the Okhotsk Sea) was similar to that of heparin. Anticoagulant properties of fucoidan are determined by thrombin inhibition mediated via plasma antithrombin III.
PubMed ID
14968163 View in PubMed
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133 records – page 1 of 14.