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Chol understandings of suicide and human agency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126527
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;36(2):245-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Gracia Imberton
Author Affiliation
Instituto de Estudios Indígenas, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Centro Universitario Campus III, Boulevard López Moreno s/n., Fátima, CP 29264 San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico. gimberton@gmail.com
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;36(2):245-63
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Causality
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology - ethnology
Personhood
Social Change
Suicide - ethnology
Abstract
According to ethnographic material collected since 2003, the Chol Mayan indigenous people in southern Mexico have different causal explanations for suicide. It can be attributed to witchcraft that forces victims to take their lives against their own will, to excessive drinking, or to fate determined by God. However, it can also be conceived of as a conscious decision made by a person overwhelmed by daily problems. Drawing from the theoretical framework developed by Laura M. Ahearn, inspired by practice theory, the paper contends that these different explanations operate within two different logics or understandings of human agency. The first logic attributes responsibility to supernatural causes such as witchcraft or divine destiny, and reflects Chol notions of personhood. The second logic accepts personal responsibility for suicide, and is related to processes of social change such as the introduction of wage labor, education and a market economy. The contemporary Chol resort to both logics to make sense of the human drama of suicide.
PubMed ID
22382678 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of anemia decreased in Mexican preschool and school-age children from 1999 to 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153408
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2009;51 Suppl 4:S507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Salvador Villalpando
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Armando García-Guerra
Verónica Mundo-Rosas
Clara Domínguez
Fabiola Mejía-Rodríguez
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. svillalp@insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2009;51 Suppl 4:S507-14
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Prevalence
Time Factors
Abstract
To compare the distribution of anemia in children, based on information from Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 (ENSANUT 2006) and Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999 (ENN-99), and examine the association of anemia with potentially explanatory variables.
Adjusted prevalence and means as well as associations with potentially explanatory variables were assessed by multiple linear and logistic regression models for complex samples.
From 1999 to 2006, the prevalence of anemia decreased 13.8 percentage points (pp) in toddlers and 7.8 pp in children 24-35 months of age; it also decreased 0.7 pp/year in urban and rural populations, 1.8 pp/year in indigenous and 0.61 pp/year in non-indigenous toddlers, 1.5 pp/year in children 5-8 years of age and 0.78 pp/year in children 9-11 years of age. In toddlers served by Oportunidades, Hb was inversely associated with indigenous ethnicity (p=0.1) and they had a lower risk of anemia (OR=0.002). In school-age children, age (OR=0.98), affiliation to Liconsa (OR=0.42) and living in the central region (OR=0.56) were protective factors for anemia.
The national prevalence of anemia in Mexico has decreased in the past seven years, especially in toddlers. Being a beneficiary of Liconsa or Oportunidades was protective for anemia.
PubMed ID
20464226 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of anemia in children 1 to 12 years of age. Results from a nationwide probabilistic survey in Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181822
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S490-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Salvador Villalpando
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Claudia Ivonne Ramírez-Silva
Fabiola Mejía-Rodríguez
Juan A Rivera
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. svillalp@insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S490-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Mexico - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
To describe the epidemiology and analyze factors associated with iron deficiency anemia in a probabilistic sample of the Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999 (ENN-99) [National Nutritional Survey 1999 (NNS-99)].
The sample included 8,111 children aged 1 to 12 years, and was nationally representative by rural and urban strata and by four geographical regions. Capillary hemoglobin was measured using a portable photometer (HemoCue). The analysis of the determining factors of anemia was performed by odds ratios derived from a logistic regression model and multiple regression models.
The prevalence of anemia was 50% in infants
PubMed ID
14746043 View in PubMed
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[Income inequality, corruption, and life expectancy at birth in Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172990
Source
Rev Salud Publica (Bogota). 2005 May-Aug;7(2):121-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alvaro Javier Idrovo
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cueravaca, Morelos, México. idrovoaj@hotmail.com
Source
Rev Salud Publica (Bogota). 2005 May-Aug;7(2):121-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Birth rate
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Poverty
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To ascertain if the effect of income inequality on life expectancy at birth in Mexico is mediated by corruption, used as a proxy of social capital.
An ecological study was carried out with the 32 Mexican federative entities. Global and by sex correlations between life expectancy at birth were estimated by federative entity with the Gini coefficient, the Corruption and Good Government Index, the percentage of Catholics, and the percentage of the population speaking indigenous language. Robust linear regressions, with and without instrumental variables, were used to explore if corruption acts as intermediate variable in the studied relationship.
Negative correlations with Spearman's rho near to -0.60 (p
PubMed ID
16149272 View in PubMed
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Intestinal parasites in children, in highly deprived areas in the border region of Chiapas, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182737
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003 Sep-Oct;45(5):379-88
Publication Type
Article
Author
Emma Marianela Morales-Espinoza
Héctor Javier Sánchez-Pérez
María del Mar García-Gil
Guadalupe Vargas-Morales
José Domingo Méndez-Sánchez
Margarita Pérez-Ramírez
Author Affiliation
Facultad de Medicina, Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003 Sep-Oct;45(5):379-88
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - epidemiology
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To assess the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among children in highly deprived areas, and its possible association with demographic and socioeconomic indicators.
From March to September 1998 in a convenience sample of 32 communities of the border region of Chiapas, Mexico, selected at random based on the level of poverty and distance from the community to the nearest health care unit (
PubMed ID
14628618 View in PubMed
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Fifteen years of change in the food environment in a rural Mexican community: the Maycoba project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107426
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013;13(3):2404
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lisa S Chaudhari
R C Begay
Leslie O Schulz
Author Affiliation
College of Health and Human Services, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. lisa.shanti@nau.edu
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2013;13(3):2404
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology
Diet
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Mexico - epidemiology
Obesity - ethnology
Prevalence
Abstract
Indigenous populations worldwide who are shifting to a westernized lifestyle experience high rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity. These conditions are commonly the result of genetic predisposition and environmental factors that promote excess energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the food environment, specifically looking at retail and subsistence-food availability, and food-acquisition behaviors in the rural Mexican town of Maycoba and surrounding communities between 1995 and 2010. The population in this area includes indigenous Pima, genetically-related to the Pima Indians in Arizona who have the highest documented rates of diabetes, and non-Pima Mexican (ie non indigenous and other indigenous). An initial study in 1995 compared the prevalence of diabetes and obesity in the Maycoba population with that of Pima Indians of Arizona and found a dramatically lower type 2 diabetes prevalence in the Maycoba region due to the protective effect of a traditional lifestyle despite a genetic predisposition to diabetes.
The 2010 follow-up study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes as well as to examine lifestyle changes over the 15 year time span, following changes to housing and the local environment. This study focused on the food environment, examining changes in food acquisition behaviors in the retail and subsistence aspects. The study included a household survey (n=71), two focus group discussions, and participant-observation. To determine changes in retail food availability, seven stores throughout the study region were audited.
The main findings were an increasing presence and use of retail stores for food: an expansion in the selection of processed foods, their prominent placement, and refrigeration allowing more perishable foods to be available to the local population. Subsistence activities remained significant, although some aspects of specific subsistence activities are in decline, such as the area allocated to home gardens and a reduction in the variety of crops cultivated in them.
Although there have been a number of changes in the food environment during the 15 year period, a traditional subsistence-based lifestyle prevails.
PubMed ID
24010521 View in PubMed
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Anemia in Mexican women: a public health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181821
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S499-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Salvador Villalpando
Juan A Rivera
Fabiola Mejía-Rodríguez
Martha Camacho-Cisneros
Eric A Monterrubio
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Departamento de Vigilancia de la Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. tshamah@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S499-507
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Mexico - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Public Health
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence and distribution of anemia among women of childbearing age (12 to 49 years) participating in the 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-1999).
The survey had a probabilistic design and was representative at the national level, of urban and rural areas and four regions: North, South, Center, and Mexico City. Hemoglobin concentration was determined in capillary blood samples using a portable photometer (HemoCue), in 17,194 women, 697 of whom were pregnant.
The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.8% in pregnant women and 20.8% in non-pregnant women. Higher prevalences were observed in rural as compared to urban areas, both in pregnant (28.0% vs 27.7%) and non-pregnant (22.6% vs 20.0%) women, but the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Women in the South had the greatest prevalence (23.2%), followed by those in the North (20.9%), Center (20.6%), and Mexico City (16.4%). Non-pregnant indigenous women had a prevalence of 24.8%, while in-non-indigenous women the prevalence was 20.4%.
Anemia in women of childbearing age is a growing public health problem that justifies the implementation of interventions for its prevention and control. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746044 View in PubMed
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Clusters, classification and epidemiology of interstitial lung diseases: concepts, methods and critical reflections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191759
Source
Eur Respir J Suppl. 2001 Sep;32:101s-106s
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
J M Antó
P. Cullinan
Author Affiliation
Respiratory and Environmental Health Research Unit, Institut Municipal d'Investigació Medica, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Eur Respir J Suppl. 2001 Sep;32:101s-106s
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Diseases, Interstitial - classification - epidemiology - etiology
New Mexico - epidemiology
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The present article reports on two conceptual and methodological issues concerning interstitial lung disease (ILD) about which there is a lot of misunderstanding and contradiction: the investigation of epidemics and clusters and the classification and epidemiology of ILD. In general, an epidemic is the occurrence of cases of an illness in excess of normal expectancy. The investigation of an epidemic often demands a number of sequential studies: first descriptive, then aetiological. Clusters consist of an increase in incidence of much smaller magnitude, perhaps excluding the possibility that this is merely a result of chance. In recent years, more valid statistical methods for the assessment of clusters have developed. For interstitial lung disease in particular, different classifications exist that are sometimes inconsistent and may change with time. All diseases require a process of ascertainment, whereby they are identified, classified and perhaps registered. The two most employed epidemiological techniques for testing aetiological hypotheses are the cohort and case-referent approaches.
PubMed ID
11816815 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children: results from the National Nutrition Survey 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181819
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bernardo Hernández
Lucía Cuevas-Nasu
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Eric A Monterrubio
Claudia Ivonne Ramírez-Silva
Raquel García-Feregrino
Juan A Rivera
Jaime Sepúlveda-Amor
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. bhernand@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to measure the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children (5-11 years) in the National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999).
Overweight and obesity (defined as an excess of adipose tissue in the body) were evaluated through the Body Mass Index (BMI) in 10,901 children, using the standard proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. Sociodemographic variables were obtained using a questionnaire administered to the children's mothers.
The national prevalence of overweight and obesity was reported to be 19.5%. The highest prevalence figures were found in Mexico City (26.6%) and the North region (25.6%). When adjusting by region, rural or urban area, sex, maternal schooling, socioeconomic status, indigenous ethnicity and age, the highest prevalences of overweight and obesity were found among girls. The risks of overweight and obesity were positively associated with maternal schooling, children's age and socioeconomic status.
Overweight and obesity are prevalent health problems in Mexican school-age children, particularly among girls, and positively associated with socioeconomic status, age, and maternal schooling. This is a major public health problem requiring preventive interventions to avoid future health consequences. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746049 View in PubMed
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Hypothermia-related deaths--United States, 1999-2002 and 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6583
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006 Mar 17;55(10):282-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-2006
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006 Mar 17;55(10):282-4
Date
Mar-17-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypothermia - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
New Mexico - epidemiology
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Wyoming - epidemiology
Abstract
Hypothermia, defined as a core body temperature of
PubMed ID
16543884 View in PubMed
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132 records – page 1 of 14.