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21st century rural nursing: Navajo Traditional and Western medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187143
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Barbara L O'Brien
Rosemary M Anslow
Wanda Begay
Sister Benvinda A Pereira
Mary Pat Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Magnetic Health Care Strategies, LLC, Middletown, New Jersey, USA.
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arizona
Case Management - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
New Mexico
Nurse practitioners
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Past experiences enhance the future. Health care providers gaining expertise in creative thinking, traditional medicine, spirituality, and cultural sensitivity is an essential requirement for 21st century health care. We must stay mindful that poverty, isolation, and rural living may create new forms of social exclusion because of lack of communication and rapidly changing technology. Conversely, sensory overload resulting from a faster paced lifestyle and rapid enhancements in technology may cause increased tension and stress. This article reviews successes that may offer the reader ideas on coping with the provision of health care services in such a volatile changing environment, while honoring tradition and cultural competency.
PubMed ID
12515233 View in PubMed
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4200 years of pine-dominated upland forest dynamics in west-central Mexico: human or natural legacy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155658
Source
Ecology. 2008 Jul;89(7):1893-907
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Blanca L Figueroa-Rangel
Katherine J Willis
Miguel Olvera-Vargas
Author Affiliation
Oxford Long-term Ecology Laboratory, Oxford University Centre for the Environment, School of Geography, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QY, United Kingdom. bfrangel@cucsur.udg.mx
Source
Ecology. 2008 Jul;89(7):1893-907
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Ecosystem
Fossils
Human Activities
Humans
Mexico
Paleontology
Pinus - physiology
Pollen
Population Dynamics
Soil
Time Factors
Trees - physiology
Abstract
The pine-dominated forests of west-central Mexico are internationally recognized for their high biodiversity, and some areas are protected through various conservation measures including prohibition of human activity. In this region, however, there is evidence for human settlement dating back to ca. AD 1200. It is therefore unclear whether the present forest composition and structure are part of a successional stage following use by indigenous human populations during the past, or due to natural processes, such as climate. We present a study reconstructing the vegetation dynamics of pine-dominated forest over the past 4200 years using paleoecological techniques. Results from fossil pollen and charcoal indicate that, in this region, pine-dominated forests are the native vegetation type and not anthropogenically derived secondary succession. The predominant driving mechanism for the expansion of pine-dominated forest appears to be intervals of aridity and naturally induced burning. A close association is noted between pine abundance and longer-term climatic trends, including intervals of aridity between ca. 4200 and 2500, 1200 and 850, and 500 and 200 cal yr BP and shorter-term trends. Evident periodicity occurs in pine and Poaceae abundance every 80 years. These short-term quasi-periodic oscillations have been recorded in a number of lake and ocean sediments in Mexico and are thought to be linked to solar forcing resulting in drought cycles that occur at approximately the same time intervals.
PubMed ID
18705376 View in PubMed
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Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1999 Nov;65(11):4793-810543788
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Cites: J Bacteriol. 1999 Jan;181(2):418-259882654
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1969 May;98(2):486-934977480
PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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The acceptability and feasibility of an intercultural birth center in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114720
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kathryn Tucker
Hector Ochoa
Rosario Garcia
Kirsty Sievwright
Amy Chambliss
Margaret C Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, NHS, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Birthing Centers - utilization
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Home Childbirth
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Mexico
Midwifery - education - standards
Patient Preference - ethnology
Pregnancy
Abstract
An intercultural birthing house was established in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, as an intervention to reduce maternal mortality among indigenous women. This birth center, known locally as the Casa Materna, is a place where women can come to give birth with their traditional birth attendant. However, three months after opening, no woman had used the birthing house.
This study reports on the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to childbirth and use of the Casa Materna from the perspective of the health workers, traditional birth attendants and the program's target population. Structured interviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with participants from each of these groups. Data was searched for emerging themes and coded.
Findings show that the potential success of this program is jeopardized by lack of transport and a strong cultural preference for home births. The paper highlights the importance of community participation in planning and implementing such an intervention and of establishing trust and mutual respect among key actors. Recommendations are provided for moving forward the maternal health agenda of indigenous women in Chiapas.
Notes
Cites: J Sex Res. 2002 Feb;39(1):58-6212476258
Cites: Midwifery. 2004 Sep;20(3):217-2515337277
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 2004 Sep-Oct;46(5):388-9815521523
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(4):785-9515950091
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 3;367(9525):1859-6916753489
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Sep 30;368(9542):1189-20017011946
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2007;3:3117803820
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Mar;66(5):1057-6918187246
Cites: Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2008 Aug;24(2):75-8419062598
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Aug;25(4):411-2118053623
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2011 Nov;26(6):496-50721278371
PubMed ID
23587122 View in PubMed
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Acculturation stress among Maya in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121282
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eugenia Millender
Author Affiliation
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA. emillend@fau.edu
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Diversity
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mexico - ethnology
Nursing Research
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Abstract: As health care disparities become more evident in our multicultural nation, culture sensitive health research needs to be a priority in order for good health care to take place. This article will explore the literature related to acculturation stress and mental health disparities among the Mayan population. Literatures of similar but distinct groups are included due to the limited amount of research of the Mayan population. Using Leiniger's Transcultural nursing theory, these findings suggest that nurses have a large gap to fill to address the mental health disparities of specific cultural groups like the indigenous Maya, thereby satisfying their nursing obligations.
PubMed ID
22924204 View in PubMed
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Activated protein C resistance and factor V Leiden in Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159624
Source
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2008 Oct;14(4):428-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Abraham Majluf-Cruz
Manuel Moreno-Hernández
Adriana Ruiz-de-Chávez-Ochoa
Rosario Monroy-García
Karim Majluf-Cruz
Rodolfo Guardado-Mendoza
Irma Molina-Avila
Irma Isordia-Salas
Norma Corona-de la Peña
Florencia Vargas-Vorackova
Jorge Vela-Ojeda
Jaime García-Chávez
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación Médica en Trombosis, Hemostasia y Aterogénesis, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Mexico City, Mexico. amajlufc@prodigy.netmx
Source
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2008 Oct;14(4):428-37
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activated Protein C Resistance - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor V - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Abstract
A common cause of hereditary thrombophilia is activated protein C resistance (APCR), and most cases result from factor V Leiden mutation. An APCR phenotype without association with factor V Leiden has been described. This transversal, observational, nonrandomized study evaluated these 2 phenomena in healthy indigenous and mestizo Mexican subjects (n = 4345), including 600 Mexican natives. No indigenous subjects had APCR, but 82 mestizo subjects did. After retesting, 50 subjects had a negative test. The remaining 32 subjects had factor V Leiden, giving a 0.85% prevalence of factor V Leiden in the mestizo Mexican population. Only 31% of APCR carriers had factor V Leiden. These results show a very low prevalence of APCR and factor V Leiden in Mexico. Except for factor V Leiden, there are no other mutations in the factor V gene responsible for the APCR phenotype. Acquired APCR is nearly twice as prevalent as the inherited variant.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2009 Jul-Aug;15(4):47719726419
Comment In: Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2009 May-Jun;15(3):36619211579
PubMed ID
18160617 View in PubMed
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[Activated protein C resistance as a cause of thrombophilia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64478
Source
Rev Invest Clin. 1996 May-Jun;48(3):223-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
G J Ruiz-Argüelles
Author Affiliation
Laboratorios Clínicos de Puebla, México.
Source
Rev Invest Clin. 1996 May-Jun;48(3):223-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antithrombin III - analysis
Blood Coagulation Factors - analysis - physiology
DNA Mutational Analysis
English Abstract
Enzyme Activation
Factor V - genetics
Factor V Deficiency - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Phenotype
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Protein C - physiology
Protein S - analysis
Thrombosis - blood - genetics
Abstract
The proportion of identifiable causes of familial thrombophilia has increased from 5-10% to 60-70% since the identification of activated protein C resistance (aPCR) in February 1993 by Dahlbäck et al. A mutation in the factor V gene (G-->A, 1691) leads to the so called Leiden mutation (R 506 Q) that produces a mutated factor V resistant to the catalytic action of activated protein C (aPC), yet normal in its procoagulant properties. This recently identified aPCR is in Nordic populations the most prevalent and well defined genetic defect associated with disease so far described. Its prevalence in the general population ranges from 0% to up to 15% and suggests that a positive genetic selection pressure has been involved. The aPCR phenotype can be assessed in vitro by measurement of the prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time in the presence of aPC, whereas the aPCR genotype is studied using polymerase chain reaction searching for the Arg to Gln mutation in the coagulation factor V gene. Some acquired conditions such as the presence of lupus anticoagulants, antiphospholipid antibodies, pregnancy, liver disease and contraceptives may lead into the aPCR phenotype. The aPCR search must be the initial step in the study of a patient with thrombophilia, either inherited or acquired aPCR together with protein C, protein S and antithrombin III explain 60 to 70% of cases of familial thrombophilia.
PubMed ID
8966383 View in PubMed
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ADDRESSING SUBSTANCE-USE PROBLEMS IN TRIBAL HOME VISITING.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299191
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):287-294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Date
05-2018
Author
Douglas K Novins
Cathy Ferron
Lisa Abramson
Allison Barlow
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado, Aurora.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):287-294
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
Given the high rates for substance use among women and men of childbearing age, perinatal and early childhood home-visiting programs serving tribal communities must consider how they will address substance-use problems among the families they support. In this study, we explored the approaches to identifying and addressing family-based substance-use problems that were implemented by nine home-visiting programs serving American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities that are funded through the federal Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (Tribal MIECHV). These programs demonstrated a high awareness of substance-use problems and took concrete action to address them above and beyond that included in the home-visiting model they used. All nine programs reported that they provided substance-use preventive services and screened for substance-use problems. While all programs referred to substance-use treatment programs when needed, in six programs the home visitor provided substance-use services. Through Tribal MIECHV, the intense need for substance-use education, assessment, service delivery, and referral in many AI/AN communities is pushing the home-visiting field forward to address this increasingly critical issue for low-income families across the United States and the world.
PubMed ID
29722426 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143615
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel Monárrez-Espino
Graciela Ivette Béjar-Lío
Guillermo Vázquez-Mendoza
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Chihuahua, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Menu Planning
Mexico
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Residential Facilities
Schools
Abstract
To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools.
Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7.
The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg.
There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.
PubMed ID
20464250 View in PubMed
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521 records – page 1 of 53.