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Dye Residue Analysis in Raw and Processed Aquaculture Products: Matrix Extension of AOAC INTERNATIONAL Official Method 2012.25.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298076
Source
J AOAC Int. 2018 Nov 01; 101(6):1927-1939
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Date
Nov-01-2018
Author
Wendy C Andersen
Christine R Casey
Tara J Nickel
Susan L Young
Sherri B Turnipseed
Author Affiliation
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Animal Drugs Research Center, Denver Federal Center, Bldg 20, Denver, CO 80225.
Source
J AOAC Int. 2018 Nov 01; 101(6):1927-1939
Date
Nov-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Animals
Calibration
Chromatography, Liquid - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Limit of Detection
Rosaniline Dyes - analysis
Seafood - analysis
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods
Abstract
Background: Triphenylmethane dyes and metabolites are known or suspected mutagens and are prohibited in animals intended for human consumption. Despite toxicity, triphenylmethane dyes are used illegally as inexpensive treatments for fungal and parasite infections in aquatic animals. Objective: AOAC INTERNTIONAL Official Method 2012.25 for the LC-MS/MS determination of malachite green, crystal violet, brilliant green, and metabolites leucomalachite green and leucocrystal violet in seafood products was previously validated for finfish (trout, salmon, catfish, and tilapia) and shrimp, but had not been fully validated for other types of aquacultured products such as eel, molluscan shellfish, or frog or for processed seafoods. Methods: Method 2012.25 was applied to a wide scope of raw and processed aquaculture products including Arctic char, barramundi, eel, frog legs, hybrid striped bass, pompano, scallops, seabream, smoked trout, dried shrimp, and highly processed canned eel and dace products. The canned products contained oil, salt, sugar, flavorings, spices, sauces, and/or preservatives. Results: Dyes and metabolites were recovered with >85% accuracy and precision generally
PubMed ID
29776453 View in PubMed
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Hemorrhoidal Disease Symptom Score and Short Health ScaleHD: New Tools to Evaluate Symptoms and Health-Related Quality of Life in Hemorrhoidal Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299730
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2019 03; 62(3):333-342
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Date
03-2019
Author
Håvard D Rørvik
Karl Styr
Lars Ilum
Grant L McKinstry
Tove Dragesund
André H Campos
Birgitte Brandstrup
Gunnar Olaison
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Holbaek Hospital, Holbaek, Denmark.
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2019 03; 62(3):333-342
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Anal Canal - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hemorrhoids - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Organ Dysfunction Scores
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Rectum - physiopathology
Reproducibility of Results
Symptom Assessment - methods
Abstract
There are no adequately validated tools to evaluate symptoms or disease-specific health-related quality of life in hemorrhoidal disease.
The purpose of this study was to assess validity, reliability, and responsiveness of a symptom score of patient-reported pain, itching, bleeding, soiling, and prolapse (Hemorrhoidal Disease Symptom Score). In addition, the study set out to assess reliability and responsiveness of an instrument to measure health-related quality of life in patients with hemorrhoids (Short Health ScaleHD), with 1 item in its 4 dimensions: symptom load, functional status, disease-specific worries, and general well-being.
This was a cross-sectional (validity and reliability) and longitudinal (responsiveness) study.
The study was conducted at a single center.
Cohort 1 included 295 patients with hemorrhoids to study validity and 60 patients with test-retest scores to study reliability. Cohort 2 included 128 and 121 patients operated for hemorrhoids to study responsiveness of the Hemorrhoidal Disease Symptom Score and the Short Health ScaleHD.
The study evaluated validity, reliability, and responsiveness. Patient-reported symptom load on a 7-point Likert scale was used as comparator, and receiver operating characteristics curve assessed discriminative validity. Interclass correlation assessed reliability. Receiver operating characteristics curve assessed responsiveness, meaning the ability to discriminate between patients with and without improvement after surgery.
The Hemorrhoidal Disease Symptom Score demonstrated the ability to discriminate between patients reporting high or low symptom load (area under the curve = 0.786 (95% CI, 0.725-0.848)). The Hemorrhoidal Disease Symptom Score and the Short Health ScaleHD demonstrated adequate reliability and responsiveness, with interclass correlation of 0.822 (95% CI, 0.715-0.891) and 0.763 (95% CI, 0.634-0.851) and area under the curve of 0.843 (95% CI, 0.756-0.929) and 0.840 (95% CI, 0.752-0.929).
We had no gold standard comparator to assess validity and responsiveness.
The findings suggest that the Hemorrhoidal Disease Symptom Score is valid, reliable, and responsive and that the Short Health ScaleHD is reliable and responsive. Used together, these tools provide a good overview of symptoms and their impact on patient well-being. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A770.
PubMed ID
30451751 View in PubMed
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Low-molecular-weight heparin for hip fracture patients treated with osteosynthesis: should thromboprophylaxis start before or after surgery? An observational study of 45,913 hip fractures reported to the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298983
Source
Acta Orthop. 2018 Dec; 89(6):615-621
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Video-Audio Media
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Sunniva Leer-Salvesen
Eva Dybvik
Lars B Engesaeter
Ola E Dahl
Jan-Erik Gjertsen
Author Affiliation
a Department of Clinical Medicine , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Acta Orthop. 2018 Dec; 89(6):615-621
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Blood Loss, Surgical - statistics & numerical data
Bone Screws
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight - therapeutic use
Hip Fractures - mortality - surgery
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - etiology - mortality
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Operative Time
Postoperative Care - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Preoperative Care - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Reoperation - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Venous Thromboembolism - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
Background and purpose - Controversies exist regarding thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic surgery. We studied whether the thromboprophylaxis in hip fracture patients treated with osteosynthesis should start preoperatively or postoperatively. Data were extracted from the nationwide Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR). The risks of postoperative deaths, reoperations, and intraoperative bleeding were studied within 6 months after surgery. Patients and methods - After each operation for hip fracture in Norway the surgeon reports information on the patient, the fracture, and the operation to the NHFR. Cox regression analyses were performed with adjustments for age group, ASA score, sex, duration of surgery, and year of surgery. During the period 2005-2016, 96,599 hip fractures were reported to the register. Only osteosyntheses where low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) were given and with known information on preoperative start of the prophylaxis were included in the analyses. Dalteparin and enoxaparin were used in 58% and 42% of the operations respectively (n = 45,913). Results - Mortality (RR =1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.06) and risk of reoperation (RR =0.99, CI 0.90-1.08) were similar comparing preoperative and postoperative start of LMWH. Postoperative start reduced the risk of intraoperative bleeding complications compared with preoperative start (RR =0.67, CI 0.51-0.90). Interpretation - The initiation of LMWH did not influence the mortality or the risk of reoperation in hip fracture patients treated with osteosynthesis. Postoperative start of LMWH could possibly decrease the risk of intraoperative bleeding.
PubMed ID
30328746 View in PubMed
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