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Methane production during storage of anaerobically digested municipal organic waste.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95739
Source
J Environ Qual. 2006 May-Jun;35(3):830-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hansen Trine Lund
Sommer Svend G
Gabriel Søren
Christensen Thomas H
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environment & Resources, Technical University of Denmark, Building 113, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
J Environ Qual. 2006 May-Jun;35(3):830-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Fermentation
Methane - biosynthesis
Organic Chemicals
Temperature
Abstract
Anaerobic digestion of source-separated municipal organic waste is considered feasible in Denmark. The limited hydraulic retention in the biogas reactor (typically 15 d) does not allow full degradation of the organic waste. Storage of anaerobically digested municipal organic waste can therefore be a source of methane (CH4) emission that may contribute significantly to the potential global warming impact from the waste treatment system. This study provides a model for quantifying the CH4 production from stored co-digested municipal organic waste and estimates the production under typical Danish climatic conditions, thus quantifying the potential global warming impact from storage of the digested municipal organic waste before its use on agricultural land. Laboratory batch tests on CH4 production as well as temperature measurements in eight full-scale storage tanks provided data for developing a model estimating the CH4 production in storage tanks containing digested municipal organic waste. The temperatures measured in separate storage tanks on farms receiving digested slurry were linearly correlated with air temperature. In storage tanks receiving slurry directly from biogas reactors, significantly higher temperatures were measured due to the high temperatures of the effluent from the reactor. Storage tanks on Danish farms are typically emptied in April and have a constant inflow of digested material. During the warmest months the content of digested material is therefore low, which limits the yearly CH4 production from storage.
PubMed ID
16585626 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic digestion of 30-100-year-old boreal lake sedimented fibre from the pulp industry: Extrapolating methane production potential to a practical scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294806
Source
Water Res. 2018 04 15; 133:218-226
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-15-2018
Author
Marika Kokko
Veera Koskue
Jukka Rintala
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FIN-3310, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: marika.kokko@tut.fi.
Source
Water Res. 2018 04 15; 133:218-226
Date
04-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Finland
Geologic sediments
Industrial Waste
Lakes
Methane - biosynthesis
Paper
Water Pollutants - metabolism
Abstract
Since the 1980s, the pulp and paper industry in Finland has resulted in the accumulation of fibres in lake sediments. One such site in Lake Näsijärvi contains approximately 1.5 million m3 sedimented fibres. In this study, the methane production potential of the sedimented fibres (on average 13% total solids (TS)) was determined in batch assays. Furthermore, the methane production from solid (on average 20% TS) and liquid fractions of sedimented fibres after solid-liquid separation was studied. The sedimented fibres resulted in fast methane production and high methane yields of 250?±?80?L CH4/kg volatile solids (VS). The main part (ca. 90%) of the methane potential was obtained from the solid fraction of the sedimented fibres. In addition, the VS removal from the total and solid sedimented fibres was high, 61-65% and 63-78%, respectively. The liquid fraction also contained a large amount of organics (on average 8.8?g COD/L), treatment of which also has to be considered. The estimations of the methane production potentials in the case area showed potential up to 40 million m3 of methane from sedimented fibres.
PubMed ID
29407702 View in PubMed
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[The influence of local anthropogenic factors on soil emission of biogenic greenhouse gases in cryogenic ecosystems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294371
Source
Zh Obshch Biol. 2016 May-Jun; 77(3):167-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
D V Karelin
S V Goriachkin
D G Zamolodchikov
A V Dolgikh
E P Zazovskaya
V A Shishkov
A V Pochikalov
A A Sirin
G G Suvorov
G N Kraev
Source
Zh Obshch Biol. 2016 May-Jun; 77(3):167-81
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Cold Climate
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Gases - metabolism
Methane - biosynthesis
Seasons
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
For the first time were the results of studies on influence of main kinds of local anthropogenic factors on soil emission of biogenic greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) in permafrost ecosystems of Arctic and North-Boreal zones of the Russian Federation, and also of the Spitsbergen Archipelag summarized. Different types of land use can, depending on their manner, lead to significant enhancing or suppression of soil CO2 emission. On average, anthropogenic factors (AFs), acting in concert, favor the enhancement of local CO2 soil emission, promoting, at the same time, an increase in its dispersion. AFs directly influence the microbial-root respiration in soil, modify the soil itself, and indirectly affect important natural respiration regulators, phytomass reserves in particular, which makes them primary factors with relation to respiration pattern. AFs influence also the emission of other biogenic greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O), though this influence can be exercised in different ways. Methane emission is mediated by degree of the territory drainage. However, in all studied cases, AFs have led to source reduction or sink intensification of this gas from the atmosphere. Unlike methane emission, N2O emission increased under the influence of AFs considered. As for the whole complex of AFs that impacts the carbon balance and fluxes of CO2 in cryogenic ecosystems, its role is expressed through the enhancement of soil respiration at the beginning of the cold season, when AFs are capable of soil emission increasing, at the level of meso-landscape, almost by 50%.
PubMed ID
30024131 View in PubMed
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Non-invasive individual methane measurement in dairy cows.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285093
Source
Animal. 2017 May;11(5):890-899
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
E. Negussie
J. Lehtinen
P. Mäntysaari
A R Bayat
A-E Liinamo
E A Mäntysaari
M H Lidauer
Source
Animal. 2017 May;11(5):890-899
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle - metabolism
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Finland
Methane - biosynthesis
Photoacoustic Techniques - methods - veterinary
Spectrophotometry, Infrared - methods - veterinary
Abstract
Attempts to lower the environmental footprint of milk production needs a sound understanding of the genetic and nutritional basis of methane (CH4) emissions from the dairy production systems. This in turn requires accurate and reliable techniques for the measurement of CH4 output from individual cows. Many of the available measurement techniques so far are either slow, expensive, labor intensive and are unsuitable for large-scale individual animal measurements. The main objectives of this study were to examine and validate a non-invasive individual cow CH4 measurement system that is based on photoacoustic IR spectroscopy (PAS) technique implemented in a portable gas analysis equipment (F10), referred to as PAS-F10 method and to estimate the magnitude of between-animal variations in CH4 output traits. Data were collected from 115 Nordic Red cows of the Minkiö experimental dairy farm, at the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke). Records on continuous daily measurements of CH4, milk yield, feed intake and BW measurements over 2 years period were compiled for data analysis. The daily CH4 output was calculated using carbon dioxide as a tracer method. Estimates from the non-invasive PAS-F10 technique were then tested against open-circuit indirect respiration calorimetric chamber measurements and against estimates from other widely used prediction models. Concordance analysis was used to establish agreement between the chamber and PAS-F10 methods. A linear mixed model was used for the analysis of the large continuous data. The daily CH4 output of cows was 555 l/day and ranged from 330 to 800 l/day. Dry matter intake, level of milk production, lactation stage and diurnal variation had significant effects on daily CH4 output. Estimates of the daily CH4 output from PAS-F10 technique compared relatively well with the other techniques. The concordance correlation coefficient between combined weekly CH4 output estimates of PAS-F10 and chamber was 0.84 with lower and upper confidence limits of 0.65 and 0.93, respectively. Similarly, when chamber CH4 measurements were predicted from PAS-F10 measurements, the mean of two separate weekly PAS-F10 measurements gave the lowest prediction error variance than either of the separate weekly PAS-F10 measurements alone. This suggests that every other week PAS-F10 measurements when combined would improve the estimation of CH4 output with PAS-F10 technique. The repeatability of daily CH4 output from PAS-F10 technique ranged from 0.40 to 0.46 indicating that some between-animal variation exist in CH4 output traits.
PubMed ID
28007048 View in PubMed
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Co-digestion of cultivated microalgae and sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263567
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Nov;171:203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Jesper Olsson
Xin Mei Feng
Johnny Ascue
Francesco G Gentili
M A Shabiimam
Emma Nehrenheim
Eva Thorin
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Nov;171:203-10
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Lakes - microbiology
Methane - biosynthesis
Microalgae - metabolism
Sewage - microbiology
Sweden
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
In this study two wet microalgae cultures and one dried microalgae culture were co-digested in different proportions with sewage sludge in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The aim was to evaluate if the co-digestion could lead to an increased efficiency of methane production compared to digestion of sewage sludge alone. The results showed that co-digestion with both wet and dried microalgae, in certain proportions, increased the biochemical methane potential (BMP) compared with digestion of sewage sludge alone in mesophilic conditions. The BMP was significantly higher than the calculated BMP in many of the mixtures. This synergetic effect was statistically significant in a mixture containing 63% (w/w VS based) undigested sewage sludge and 37% (w/w VS based) wet algae slurry, which produced 23% more methane than observed with undigested sewage sludge alone. The trend was that thermophilic co-digestion of microalgae and undigested sewage sludge did not give the same synergy.
PubMed ID
25203227 View in PubMed
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Methane production and energy evaluation of a farm scaled biogas plant in cold climate area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262750
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Oct;169:72-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Kristian Fjørtoft
John Morken
Jon Fredrik Hanssen
Tormod Briseid
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Oct;169:72-9
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Ammonia - analysis
Animals
Biofuels
Bioreactors
Cattle
Cold Climate
Fishes
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Methane - biosynthesis
Norway
Silage
Temperature
Time Factors
Volatilization
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the specific methane production and the energy balance at a small farm scaled mesophilic biogas plant in a cold climate area. The main substrate was dairy cow slurry. Fish silage was used as co-substrate for two of the three test periods. Energy production, substrate volumes and thermal and electric energy consumption was monitored. Methane production depended mainly on type and amount of substrates, while energy consumption depended mainly on the ambient temperature. During summer the main thermal energy consumption was caused by heating of new substrates, while covering for thermal energy losses from digester and pipes required most thermal energy during winter. Fish silage gave a total energy production of 1623 k Wh/m(3), while the dairy cow slurry produced 79 k Wh/m(3) slurry. Total energy demand at the plant varied between 26.9% and 88.2% of the energy produced.
PubMed ID
25033326 View in PubMed
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Characterisation of excavated fine fraction and waste composition from a Swedish landfill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281139
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2016 Dec;34(12):1292-1299
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Yahya Jani
Fabio Kaczala
Charlotte Marchand
Marika Hogland
Mait Kriipsalu
William Hogland
Anders Kihl
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2016 Dec;34(12):1292-1299
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Metals - analysis
Methane - biosynthesis
Particle Size
Plastics
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Solid Waste - analysis
Sweden
Waste Disposal Facilities
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Wood
Abstract
The present research studies the characterisation and the physico-chemical properties of an excavated fine fraction (
PubMed ID
27742875 View in PubMed
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Screening biological methods for laboratory scale stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283967
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:739-747
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Tiina J Mönkäre
Marja R T Palmroth
Jukka A Rintala
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:739-747
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Anaerobiosis
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Finland
Gases
Laboratories
Methane - biosynthesis
Mining - methods
Sewage
Waste Disposal Facilities
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Increasing interest for the landfill mining and the amount of fine fraction (FF) in landfills (40-70% (w/w) of landfill content) mean that sustainable treatment and utilization methods for FF are needed. For this study FF (
PubMed ID
27865763 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic co-digestion of acetate-rich with lignin-rich wastewater and the effect of hydrotalcite addition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279741
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Lourdes Rodriguez-Chiang
Jordi Llorca
Olli Dahl
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - chemistry - metabolism
Aluminum Hydroxide - chemistry
Anaerobiosis
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Finland
Lignin - chemistry - metabolism
Magnesium Hydroxide - chemistry
Methane - biosynthesis
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
The methane potential and biodegradability of different ratios of acetate and lignin-rich effluents from a neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC) pulp mill were investigated. Results showed ultimate methane yields up to 333±5mLCH4/gCOD when only acetate-rich substrate was added and subsequently lower methane potentials of 192±4mLCH4/gCOD when the lignin fraction was increased. The presence of lignin showed a linear decay in methane production, resulting in a 41% decrease in methane when the lignin-rich feed had a 30% increase. A negative linear correlation between lignin content and biodegradability was also observed. Furthermore, the effect of hydrotalcite (HT) addition was evaluated and showed increase in methane potential of up to 8%, a faster production rate and higher soluble lignin removal (7-12% higher). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies between 64 and 83% were obtained for all samples.
PubMed ID
27347802 View in PubMed
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Methanogenesis at extremely haloalkaline conditions in the soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266671
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2015 Apr;91(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Dimitry Y Sorokin
Ben Abbas
Mitchell Geleijnse
Nikolai V Pimenov
Marina V Sukhacheva
Mark C M van Loosdrecht
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2015 Apr;91(4)
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA Restriction Enzymes - genetics
Ecosystem
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lakes - chemistry - microbiology
Methane - biosynthesis - metabolism
Methanosarcinaceae - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Russia
Salinity
Siberia
Sodium Chloride - chemistry
Abstract
Microbial methanogenesis at extreme conditions of saline alkaline soda lakes has, so far, been poorly investigated. Despite the obvious domination of sulfidogenesis as the therminal anaerobic process in the hypersaline soda lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, southwestern Siberia), high concentrations of methane were detected in the anaerobic sediments. Potential activity measurements with different substrates gave results significantly deviating from what is commonly found in hypersaline habitats with neutral pH. In particular, not only a non-competitive methylotrophic pathway was active, but also lithotrophic and, in some cases, even acetate-dependent methanogenesis was found to be present in hypersaline soda lake sediments. All three pathways were functioning exclusively within the alkaline pH range between 8 and 10.5, while the salt concentration was the key factor influencing the activity. Methylotrophic and, to a lesser extent, lithotrophic methanogenesis were active up to soda-saturating conditions (4 M total Na(+)). Acetate-dependent methanogenesis was observed at salinities below 3 M total Na(+). Detection of methanogens in sediments using the mcrA gene as a functional marker demonstrated domination of methylotrophic genera Methanolobus and Methanosalsum and lithotrophic Methanocalculus. In a few cases, acetoclastic Methanosaeta was detected, as well as two deep lineage methanogens. Cultivation results corresponded well to the mcrA-based observations. Enrichments for natronophilic methylotrophic methanogens resulted in isolation of Methanolobus strains at moderate salinity, while at salt concentrations above 2 M Na(+) a novel member of the genus Methanosalsum was dominating. Enrichments with H2 or formate invariably resulted in domination of close relatives of Methanocalculus natronophilus. Enrichments with acetate at low salt concentration yielded two acetoclastic alkaliphilic Methanosaeta cultures, while at salinity above 1 M Na(+) syntrophic associations were apparently responsible for the observed acetate conversion to methane. Overall, the results indicated the presence of functionally structured and active methanogenic populations in Siberian hypersaline soda lakes.
PubMed ID
25764464 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.