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1H NMR studies on human plasma lipids from newborn infants, healthy adults, and adults with tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25704
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1989 Jan;9(1):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
S. Eskelinen
Y. Hiltunen
J. Jokisaari
S. Virtanen
K. Kiviniitty
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Physics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1989 Jan;9(1):35-8
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Hydrogen
Infant, Newborn - blood
Lactates - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - diagnostic use
Male
Methane - blood
Neoplasms - blood
Protons
Abstract
The 1H NMR spectra of the lipid region of human plasma from healthy adults, neonates, and patients with malignant and nonmalignant tumors have been recorded on a JNM-GX400 FT spectrometer operating at 399.6 MHz for protons. The chemical shifts of methylene and methyl groups of plasma lipids were measured with respect to the higher field component of the methyl proton resonance of the lactate molecule. The results show that there are changes in the chemical shifts of the methylene proton resonances among the plasma from healthy adults, adults with tumors, and neonates. The shifts observed in the case of cancer patients and neonates are in the direction opposite to the shift measured from the plasma of healthy adults. Thus, the observed changes cannot be explained by the activity in the cell proliferation of tissues which is high in the cases of both healthy neonates and patients with malignant tumors, but they most probably reflect the different lipoprotein compositions of neonates, healthy adults, and adults with tumors.
PubMed ID
2540395 View in PubMed
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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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A 300-million-year record of atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil plant cuticles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95961
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2001
Author
Retallack G J
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403-1272, USA. gregr@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Date
May-17-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmosphere - chemistry
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Cold Climate
Fossils
Ginkgo biloba - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Greenhouse Effect
Ice
Methane - metabolism
Phylogeny
Plant Leaves - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal
Pollen
Seasons
Water - metabolism
Abstract
To understand better the link between atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate over geological time, records of past CO2 are reconstructed from geochemical proxies. Although these records have provided us with a broad picture of CO2 variation throughout the Phanerozoic eon (the past 544 Myr), inconsistencies and gaps remain that still need to be resolved. Here I present a continuous 300-Myr record of stomatal abundance from fossil leaves of four genera of plants that are closely related to the present-day Ginkgo tree. Using the known relationship between leaf stomatal abundance and growing season CO2 concentrations, I reconstruct past atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the past 300 Myr, only two intervals of low CO2 (2,000 p.p.m.v.) concentrations. These results are consistent with some reconstructions of past CO2 (refs 1, 2) and palaeotemperature records, but suggest that CO2 reconstructions based on carbon isotope proxies may be compromised by episodic outbursts of isotopically light methane. These results support the role of water vapour, methane and CO2 in greenhouse climate warming over the past 300 Myr.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):247-811357108
PubMed ID
11357126 View in PubMed
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[Abundance and diversity of methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria in northern wetlands].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259581
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):204-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Danilova
S N Dedysh
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):204-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Fresh Water - microbiology
Gammaproteobacteria - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Methane - metabolism
Methylococcaceae - genetics
Methylocystaceae - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxygenases - genetics
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Russia
Wetlands
Abstract
Numeric abundance, identity and pH preferences of methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria (type I methanotrophs) inhabiting the northern acidic wetlands were studied. The rates of methane oxidation by peat samples from six-wetlands of European Northern Russia (pH 3.9-4.7) varied from 0.04 to 0.60 µg CH4 g(-1) peat h(-1). The number of cells revealed by hybridization with fluorochrome-labeled probes M84 + M705 specific for type I methanotrophs was 0.05-2.16 x 10(5) cells g(-1) dry peat, i.e. 0.4-12.5% of the total number of methanotrophs and 0.004-0.39% of the total number of bacteria. Analysis of the fragments of the pmoA gene encoding particulate methane monooxygenase revealed predominance of the genus Methylocystis (92% of the clones) in the studied sample of acidic peat, while the proportion of the pmoA sequences of type I methanotrophs was insignificant (8%). PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene fragments of type I methanotrophs with TypeIF-Type IR primers had low specificity, since only three sequences out of 53 analyzed belonged to methanotrophs and exhibited 93-99% similarity to those of Methylovulum, Methylomonas, and Methylobacter species. Isolates of type I methanotrophs obtained from peat (strains SH10 and 83A5) were identified as members of the species Methylomonaspaludis and Methylovulum miyakonense, respectively. Only Methylomonaspaludum SH10 was capable of growth in acidic media (pH range for growth 3.8-7.2 with the optimum at pH 5.8-6.2), while Methylovulum miyakonense 83A5 exhibited the typical growth characteristics of neutrophilic methanotrophs (pH range for growth 5.5-8.0 with the optimum at pH 6.5-7.5).
PubMed ID
25423724 View in PubMed
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Active Microbial Communities Inhabit Sulphate-Methane Interphase in Deep Bedrock Fracture Fluids in Olkiluoto, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274433
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:979530
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Malin Bomberg
Mari Nyyssönen
Petteri Pitkänen
Anne Lehtinen
Merja Itävaara
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:979530
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - genetics - metabolism
Base Sequence
Ecosystem
Finland
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Groundwater - microbiology
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Methane - metabolism
Phylogeny
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sulfates - metabolism
Abstract
Active microbial communities of deep crystalline bedrock fracture water were investigated from seven different boreholes in Olkiluoto (Western Finland) using bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA, dsrB, and mcrA gene transcript targeted 454 pyrosequencing. Over a depth range of 296-798?m below ground surface the microbial communities changed according to depth, salinity gradient, and sulphate and methane concentrations. The highest bacterial diversity was observed in the sulphate-methane mixing zone (SMMZ) at 250-350?m depth, whereas archaeal diversity was highest in the lowest boundaries of the SMMZ. Sulphide-oxidizing e-proteobacteria (Sulfurimonas sp.) dominated in the SMMZ and ?-proteobacteria (Pseudomonas spp.) below the SMMZ. The active archaeal communities consisted mostly of ANME-2D and Thermoplasmatales groups, although Methermicoccaceae, Methanobacteriaceae, and Thermoplasmatales (SAGMEG, TMG) were more common at 415-559?m depth. Typical indicator microorganisms for sulphate-methane transition zones in marine sediments, such as ANME-1 archaea, a-, ß- and d-proteobacteria, JS1, Actinomycetes, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, and MBGB Crenarchaeota were detected at specific depths. DsrB genes were most numerous and most actively transcribed in the SMMZ while the mcrA gene concentration was highest in the deep methane rich groundwater. Our results demonstrate that active and highly diverse but sparse and stratified microbial communities inhabit the Fennoscandian deep bedrock ecosystems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26425566 View in PubMed
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Activity and diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria along a Norwegian sub-Arctic glacier forefield.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299197
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 05 01; 94(5):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-01-2018
Author
Alejandro Mateos-Rivera
Lise Øvreås
Bryan Wilson
Jacob C Yde
Kai W Finster
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Bergen, NO-5020, Bergen, Norway.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 05 01; 94(5):
Date
05-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Ice Cover - microbiology
Methane - metabolism
Methylococcaceae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Methane (CH4) is one of the most abundant greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and identification of its sources and sinks is crucial for the reliability of climate model outputs. Although CH4 production and consumption rates have been reported from a broad spectrum of environments, data obtained from glacier forefields are restricted to a few locations. We report the activities of methanotrophic communities and their diversity along a chronosequence in front of a sub-Arctic glacier using high-throughput sequencing and gas flux measurements. CH4 oxidation rates were measured in the field throughout the growing season during three sampling times at eight different sampling points in combination with laboratory incubation experiments. The overall results showed that the methanotrophic community had similar trends of increased CH4 consumption and increased abundance as a function of soil development and time of year. Sequencing results revealed that the methanotrophic community was dominated by a few OTUs and that a short-term increase in CH4 concentration, as performed in the field measurements, altered slightly the relative abundance of the OTUs.
PubMed ID
29617984 View in PubMed
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Aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene in aquifer sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83353
Source
Chemosphere. 2005 Sep;60(11):1555-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Broholm Kim
Ludvigsen Liselotte
Jensen Thorkild Feldthusen
Østergaard Henrik
Author Affiliation
DHI--Institute for Water and Environment, HSW, Agern Alle 5, DK-2970 Hørsholm, Denmark. kib@dhi.dk
Source
Chemosphere. 2005 Sep;60(11):1555-64
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Biodegradation, Environmental
Dichloroethylenes - chemistry
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Oxygen - chemistry
Vinyl Chloride - chemistry
Abstract
Laboratory batch experiments have been performed with sediment and groundwater obtained from two sites in Denmark to study the aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC) and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (c-1,2-DCE) to assess the natural aerobic biodegradation potential at two sites. The experiments revealed that VC was degraded to below the detection limit within 204 and 57 days at the two sites. c-1,2-DCE was also degraded in the experiments but not completely. At the two sites 50% and 35% was removed by the end of the experimental period of 204 and 274 days. The removal of c-1,2-DCE seems to occur concomitantly with VC indicating that the biodegradation of c-1,2-DCE may depend on the biodegradation of VC. However, in both cases natural groundwater was mixed with sediment and consequently there may be other compounds (e.g. ammonium, natural organic compound etc.) that serves as primary substrates for the co-metabolic biodegradation of c-1,2-DCE. At one of the sites methane was supplied to try to enhance the biodegradation of VC and c-1,2-DCE. That was successful since the time for complete biodegradation of VC decreased from 204 days in the absence of methane to 84 days in the presence of methane. For c-1,2-DCE the amount that was biodegraded after 204 days increased from 50% to 90% as a result of the addition of methane. It seems like a potential for natural biodegradation exists at least for VC at these two sites and also to some degree for c-1,2-DCE.
PubMed ID
16083761 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Miljø og Sundhed, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Animals
Cattle
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health
Humans
Methane - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pollen
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Air quality, health and climate change are closely connected. Ozone depends on temperature and the greenhouse gas methane from cattle and biomass. Pollen presence depends on temperature and CO2. The effect of climate change on particulate air pollution is complex, but the likely net effect is greater health risks. Reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions by reduced livestock production and use of combustion for energy production, transport and heating will also improve air quality. Energy savings in buildings and use of CO2 neutral fuels should not deteriorate indoor and outdoor air quality.
PubMed ID
19857393 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic co-digestion of acetate-rich with lignin-rich wastewater and the effect of hydrotalcite addition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279741
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Lourdes Rodriguez-Chiang
Jordi Llorca
Olli Dahl
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - chemistry - metabolism
Aluminum Hydroxide - chemistry
Anaerobiosis
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Finland
Lignin - chemistry - metabolism
Magnesium Hydroxide - chemistry
Methane - biosynthesis
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
The methane potential and biodegradability of different ratios of acetate and lignin-rich effluents from a neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC) pulp mill were investigated. Results showed ultimate methane yields up to 333±5mLCH4/gCOD when only acetate-rich substrate was added and subsequently lower methane potentials of 192±4mLCH4/gCOD when the lignin fraction was increased. The presence of lignin showed a linear decay in methane production, resulting in a 41% decrease in methane when the lignin-rich feed had a 30% increase. A negative linear correlation between lignin content and biodegradability was also observed. Furthermore, the effect of hydrotalcite (HT) addition was evaluated and showed increase in methane potential of up to 8%, a faster production rate and higher soluble lignin removal (7-12% higher). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies between 64 and 83% were obtained for all samples.
PubMed ID
27347802 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic digestion of 30-100-year-old boreal lake sedimented fibre from the pulp industry: Extrapolating methane production potential to a practical scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294806
Source
Water Res. 2018 04 15; 133:218-226
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-15-2018
Author
Marika Kokko
Veera Koskue
Jukka Rintala
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FIN-3310, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: marika.kokko@tut.fi.
Source
Water Res. 2018 04 15; 133:218-226
Date
04-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Finland
Geologic sediments
Industrial Waste
Lakes
Methane - biosynthesis
Paper
Water Pollutants - metabolism
Abstract
Since the 1980s, the pulp and paper industry in Finland has resulted in the accumulation of fibres in lake sediments. One such site in Lake Näsijärvi contains approximately 1.5 million m3 sedimented fibres. In this study, the methane production potential of the sedimented fibres (on average 13% total solids (TS)) was determined in batch assays. Furthermore, the methane production from solid (on average 20% TS) and liquid fractions of sedimented fibres after solid-liquid separation was studied. The sedimented fibres resulted in fast methane production and high methane yields of 250?±?80?L CH4/kg volatile solids (VS). The main part (ca. 90%) of the methane potential was obtained from the solid fraction of the sedimented fibres. In addition, the VS removal from the total and solid sedimented fibres was high, 61-65% and 63-78%, respectively. The liquid fraction also contained a large amount of organics (on average 8.8?g COD/L), treatment of which also has to be considered. The estimations of the methane production potentials in the case area showed potential up to 40 million m3 of methane from sedimented fibres.
PubMed ID
29407702 View in PubMed
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168 records – page 1 of 17.