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Application of synchrotron microprobe methods to solid-phase speciation of metals and metalloids in house dust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132165
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Oct 1;45(19):8233-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2011
Author
S R Walker
H E Jamieson
P E Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen's University , Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Oct 1;45(19):8233-40
Date
Oct-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arsenates - chemistry
Canada
Dust - analysis
Humans
Lead - isolation & purification
Metalloids - isolation & purification
Metals - isolation & purification
Molecular Probe Techniques
Soil - chemistry
Solid Phase Extraction - methods
Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission
Synchrotrons
Wood - chemistry
X-Ray Diffraction
Zinc - isolation & purification
Abstract
Determination of the source and form of metals in house dust is important to those working to understand human and particularly childhood exposure to metals in residential environments. We report the development of a synchrotron microprobe technique for characterization of multiple metal hosts in house dust. We have applied X-ray fluorescence for chemical characterization and X-ray diffraction for crystal structure identification using microfocused synchrotron X-rays at a less than 10 µm spot size. The technique has been evaluated by application to archived house dust samples containing elevated concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Ba in bedroom dust, and Pb and As in living room dust. The technique was also applied to a sample of soil from the corresponding garden to identify linkages between indoor and outdoor sources of metals. Paint pigments including white lead (hydrocerussite) and lithopone (wurtzite and barite) are the primary source of Pb, Zn, and Ba in bedroom dust, probably related to renovation activity in the home at the time of sampling. The much lower Pb content in the living room dust shows a relationship to the exterior soil and no specific evidence of Pb and Zn from the bedroom paint pigments. The technique was also successful at confirming the presence of chromated copper arsenate treated wood as a source of As in the living room dust. The results of the study have confirmed the utility of this approach in identifying specific metal forms within the dust.
PubMed ID
21842879 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants and metals among Inuit and Chukchi in Russian Arctic Chukotka.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122663
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18592
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
  1 document  
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St-Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18592
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
4941326
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Safety
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Metals - isolation & purification
Organic Chemicals - isolation & purification
Population Groups
Risk Reduction Behavior
Russia
Abstract
The general aim was to assess dietary exposure to selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals among Eskimo (Inuit) and Chukchi of the Chukotka Peninsula of the Russian Arctic, and to establish recommendations for exposure risk reduction.
A cross-sectional evaluation of nutritional patterns of coastal and inland indigenous peoples of the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug (in 2001-2003); assessment of the levels of persistent toxic substances (PTSs) in traditional foods and their comparison to Russian food safety limits; the identification of local sources of food contamination; and the recommendation and implementation of risk management measures.
Community-based dietary survey of self reported food frequencies (453 persons), chemical analyses (POPs and metals) of local foods and indoor matters (397 samples), substantiation of recommendations for daily (weekly, monthly) intakes of traditional food.
POPs in traditional food items are generally below the Russian food safety limits except marine mammal fat, while Hg and Cd are high mainly in mammal viscera. Lead is relatively low in tissues of all animals studied. For the Chukotka coastal communities, seals constitute the principal source of the whole suite of PTSs considered. Consumption restrictions are recommended for marine and freshwater fish, some wild meats (waterfowl and seal), fats (whale and seal), liver (most animals) and kidney (reindeer, walrus and seal). Evidence is presented that contamination of foodstuffs may be significantly increased during storing/processing/cooking of food due to indoor and outdoor environmental conditions.
Based on the analytical findings and the local PTSs sources identified, guidelines on food safety are suggested, as well as measures to reduce food contamination and domestic and local sources. Important and urgent remedial actions are recommended to minimize PTSs environmental and domestic contamination. Waste clean-up activities started in coastal Chukotka in 2007.
Notes
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2003 Aug;5(4):689-9612948250
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1999 Jun 1;230(1-3):1-8210466227
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2009 Sep 15;407(19):5216-2219608216
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2007 Aug;9(8):884-9317671671
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004;63 Suppl 2:179-8215736647
PubMed ID
22789517 View in PubMed
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Electrodialytic treatment for metal removal from sewage sludge ash from fluidized bed combustion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98515
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2010 Apr 15;176(1-3):1073-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2010
Author
M. Pazos
G M Kirkelund
L M Ottosen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain. mcurras@uvigo.es
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2010 Apr 15;176(1-3):1073-8
Date
Apr-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Denmark
Dialysis
Electrochemical Techniques - methods
Fertilizers - standards
Incineration
Metals - isolation & purification
Sewage - analysis
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Abstract
Sewage sludge contains several potentially hazardous compounds such as heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, etc. However, elements with high agricultural value (P, K or Ca) are also present. During the last years, the fluidized bed sludge combustor (FBSC) is considered an effective and novel alternative to treat sewage sludge. By its use, the high amount of sludge is reduced to a small quantity of ash and thermal destruction of toxic organic constituents is obtained. Conversely, heavy metals are retained in the ash. In this work the possibility for electrodialytic metal removal for sewage sludge ash from FBSC was studied. A detailed characterization of the sewage sludge ash was done initially, determining that, with the exception of Cd, the other heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) were under the limiting levels of Danish legislation for the use of sewage sludge as fertilizer. After 14 days of electrodialytic treatment, the Cd concentration was reduced to values below the limiting concentration. In all experiments the concentrations of other metals were under limiting values of the Danish legislation. It can be concluded that the electrodialytic treatment is an adequate alternative to reduce the Cd concentration in FBSC ash prior to use as fertilizer.
PubMed ID
20034740 View in PubMed
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