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569 records – page 1 of 57.

Accumulated body burden and endogenous release of lead in employees of a lead smelter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209372
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
D E Fleming
D. Boulay
N S Richard
J P Robin
C L Gordon
C E Webber
D R Chettle
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Calcaneus - chemistry
Canada
Female
Humans
Lead - analysis - blood
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Occupational Exposure
Tibia - chemistry
Abstract
Bone lead levels for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers were measured in vivo by X-ray fluorescence in May-June 1994. The bone sites of study were the tibia and calcaneus; magnitudes of concentration were used to gauge lead body burden. Whole blood lead readings from the workers generated a cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) that approximated the level of lead exposure over time. Blood lead values for 204 of the 381 workers were gathered from workers returning from a 10-month work interruption that ended in 1991; their blood level values were compared to their tibia and calcaneus lead levels. The resulting relations allowed constraints to be placed on the endogenous release of lead from bone in smelter works. Calcaneus lead levels were found to correlate strongly with those for tibia lead, and in a manner consistent with observations from other lead industry workers. Relations between bone lead concentration and CBLI demonstrated a distinctly nonlinear appearance. When the active population was divided by date of hire, a significant difference in the bone lead-CBLI slope emerged. After a correction to include the component of CBLI existing before the workers' employment at the smelter was made, this difference persisted. This implies that the transfer of lead from blood to bone in the workers has changed over time, possibly as a consequence of varying exposure conditions.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1975 May;32(2):119-391131339
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Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1983 Feb;40(1):51-76402004
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jun 9;308(23):1373-76188954
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PubMed ID
9105798 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Actual nutrition study and body weight indices of metallurgical industry workers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62422
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1980 May-Jun;(3):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
B L Smolianskii
L S Shibaeva
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1980 May-Jun;(3):24-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Diet
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Nutrition
Trace Elements - metabolism
Ukraine
Vitamins - metabolism
Abstract
The diet specificity was studied in 335 male workers engaged in blast-furnace and open hearth plants, rail-structural, oxygen converter and sheet-rolling mills of the steel plant. The energy value of the diets under study amounted to 3746-4091 kcal a day, with the mean value being equal to 3947 kcal. The content of proteins including those of animal origin and the content of mineral substances corresponded with health recommendations. The content of carbohydrates and vitamins was slightly less as compared to that according to the recommended physiological requirements. The diet was abundant in fats, particularly in those of animal origin. Overweight was recorded in 18.9% and obesity in 5.8% of the workers.
PubMed ID
7405128 View in PubMed
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[Adaptive capacities of children with different number of congenital morphogenetic variants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127921
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
E N Kotysheva
M Iu Bolotskaia
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):69-73
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects - genetics
Adaptation, Psychological - drug effects
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Autonomic Nervous System - drug effects - growth & development - physiology
Child
Environmental monitoring
Genetic Variation
Humans
Metallurgy
Morphogenesis - drug effects - genetics
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Adaptive capacities were studied in 6-7-year-ol apparently healthy children in relation to the number of congenital morphogenetic variants (CMVs). The most markedly reduced adaptive capacities were revealed in children with 5 CMVs or more.
PubMed ID
22250398 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18199
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2003
Author
Anna Bessö
Fredrik Nyberg
Göran Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.besso@imm.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Date
Nov-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the importance of exposure to ambient air pollution for lung cancer risk, we conducted a case-control study in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter. The smelter started operations in 1930 and had very high emissions during the early decades, particularly of arsenic and SO(2). Among subjects deceased 1961-1990 in the municipality where the smelter is located and who had not worked at the smelter, 209 male and 107 female lung cancer cases were identified and matched by sex and year of birth to 518 and 209 controls, respectively. Information on smoking habits, occupations and residences was collected by questionnaire to next-of-kin and from registry data. Living close to the smelter was associated with a relative risk (RR) for lung cancer of 1.38 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-2.14] among men, adjusted for smoking and occupational exposures. No clear difference in risk was detected for men deceased 1961-1979 compared to men deceased 1980-1990 (RR point estimates 1.42 and 1.29, respectively). There appeared to be an increased risk especially for men exposed in the beginning of the operations (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.90-2.54), in particular combined with exposure duration shorter than 20 years (RR = 2.52, 95% CI 0.89-7.11). For women, however, no overall increased risk for lung cancer was observed. Although not significant, our findings thus indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among men living close to the nonferrous smelter. This increase appeared to concern primarily men exposed during the early years of operations, when emissions were very high.
PubMed ID
14506746 View in PubMed
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Allergen sensitization and exposure to irritants in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34628
Source
Allergy. 1996 Oct;51(10):719-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
V. Søyseth
J. Kongerud
J. Boe
Author Affiliation
Hydro Aluminium Ardal, Ovre Ardal, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 1996 Oct;51(10):719-23
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Aluminum
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fluorides - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Metallurgy
Norway
Odds Ratio
Pollen
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - etiology
Skin Tests
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
We investigated the relationship between residence in the neighbourhood of an aluminium smelter and the prevalence of atopy in schoolchildren (7-13 years of age). Atopy was assessed in 556 of the 620 participants by a skin prick test with eight common aeroallergens. The median exposures to sulphur dioxide and fluoride during the pollen season in the age interval 19-36 months were 24 and 3.1 micrograms/m3 in the spring and 20 and 3.3 micrograms/m3 in the summer, respectively. The odds ratio (OR) of having atopy was 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2-3.3) in those children who had lived in the index area for 7 years or more compared with those who had lived there less than 7 years (cumulative effect). The OR of atopy was 2.5 (1.4-4.4) in those who had lived in the index area during the age interval of 19-36 months compared with rural residence during this age-interval (age-specific effect). When the age-specific effect and the cumulative effect were compared in the same logistic model, the former decreased to 1.1 (0.4-3.0), whereas the latter was 2.2 (0.7-6.6). The results indicate that exposure to these low levels of irritants during early childhood increases allergen sensitization in children.
PubMed ID
8905000 View in PubMed
Less detail

[All-Russian scientific conference "Problems of environmentally induced health disorders in population of industrialized towns of South Ural with advanced ferrous metallurgy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175334
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2005;(2):45-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2005

Aluminium in the blood and urine of industrially exposed workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241674
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1983 Aug;40(3):301-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1983
Author
B. Sjögren
I. Lundberg
V. Lidums
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1983 Aug;40(3):301-4
Date
Aug-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aluminum - metabolism
Chemical Industry
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Medicine
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Sweden
Welding
Abstract
Blood and urine aluminium concentrations were studied in industrially exposed workers using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Welders and workers making aluminium powder and aluminium sulphate had higher concentrations in blood and urine than non-exposed referents. Workers in the electrolytic production of aluminium had higher urine but not blood concentrations than the referents. Thus aluminium was found to be absorbed by all industrially exposed workers. Blood concentrations were lower than those presumably associated with aluminium induced encephalopathy in patients receiving dialysis.
Notes
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1976 Oct 21;38(1):1-17977149
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Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1962 Oct;19:253-6313932137
PubMed ID
6871119 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aluminum smelter-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and flatfish health in the Kitimat marine ecosystem, British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265910
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Apr 15;512-513:227-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2015
Author
Lyndal L Johnson
Gina M Ylitalo
Mark S Myers
Bernadita F Anulacion
Jon Buzitis
Tracy K Collier
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Apr 15;512-513:227-39
Date
Apr-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum
Animals
British Columbia
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Fishes - physiology
Metallurgy
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
From 2000-2004 a monitoring study was conducted to evaluate the impacts of aluminum smelter-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the health of fish in the marine waters of Kitimat, British Columbia, Canada. These waters are part of the historical fishing grounds of the Haisla First Nation, and since the 1950s the Alcan Primary Metal Company has operated an aluminum smelter at the head of the Kitimat Arm embayment. As a result, adjacent marine and estuarine sediments have been severely contaminated with a mixture of smelter-associated PAHs in the range of 10,000-100,000 ng/g dry wt. These concentrations are above those shown to cause adverse effects in fish exposed to PAHs in urban estuaries, but it was uncertain whether comparable effects would be seen at the Kitimat site due to limited bioavailability of smelter-derived PAHs. Over the 5-year study we conducted biennial collections of adult English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and sediment samples at the corresponding capture sites. Various tissue samples (e.g. liver, kidney, gonad, stomach contents) and bile were taken from each animal to determine levels of exposure and biological effects, and compare the uptake and toxicity of smelter-derived PAHs with urban mixtures of PAHs. Results showed significant intersite differences in concentrations of PAHs. Sole collected at sites nearest the smelter showed increased PAH exposure, as well as significantly higher prevalences of PAH-associated liver disease, compared to sites within Kitimat Arm that were more distant from the smelter. However, measures of PAH exposure (e.g., bile metabolites) were surprisingly high in sole from the reference sites outside of Kitimat Arm, though sediment and dietary PAHs at these sites were low, and fish from the areas showed no biological injury. PAH uptake, exposure, and biological effects in Kitimat English sole were relatively lower when compared to English sole collected from urban sites contaminated with PAH mixtures from other sources. These findings indicate that while smelter-associated PAHs in Kitimat Arm appear to be causing some injury to marine resources, they likely have reduced bioavailability, and thus reduced biological toxicity, compared to other environmental PAH mixtures.
PubMed ID
25625635 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ambient air pollution in naturally doped ore processing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194280
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(3):42-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001

[Ambulatory service to patients with a loss of work capacity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250443
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1977;(4):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977

569 records – page 1 of 57.