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2D:4D finger length ratio and reproductive indices in a Chuvashian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108304
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):617-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leonid Kalichman
Valery Batsevich
Eugene Kobyliansky
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):617-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fingers - anatomy & histology - radiography
Humans
Male
Menarche
Menopause
Metacarpal Bones - anatomy & histology - radiography
Middle Aged
Reproduction
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
to evaluate the association between 2D:4D finger length ratios (representing the prenatal environment, i.e., early androgen exposure) and reproductive indices, such as age at menarche, menopausal age, and length of reproductive period.
Retrospective data on age at menarche and menopausal age as well as x-rays of both hands were obtained from 674 Chuvashian women aged 18-70 years (mean 46.32?±?15.42). Finger and metacarpal length ratios as well as visual classification of finger ratio types, were estimated from the x-rays.
We found that a low 2D:4D ratio (radiologically evaluated), a masculine 2D:4D ratio type (visually evaluated), and a putative bioassay for prenatal androgen exposure, were associated with a later menarche and a shorter reproductive period. No association was found with menopausal age.
PubMed ID
23907730 View in PubMed
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Three-dimensional quantitative comparative analysis of trapezial-metacarpal joint surface curvatures in human populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130077
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2012 Jan;37(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Mary W Marzke
Matt W Tocheri
Robert F Marzke
John D Femiani
Author Affiliation
School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Department of Physics, College of Technology and Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-2402, USA. mary.marzke@asu.edu
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2012 Jan;37(1):72-6
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Cadaver
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Male
Metacarpal Bones - anatomy & histology - radiography
Metacarpophalangeal Joint - anatomy & histology - radiography
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Trapezium Bone - anatomy & histology - radiography
Abstract
Trapezial-metacarpal (TM) joint surfaces appear to be shallower in Asian than in white postmortem specimens, and the frequency of TM osteoarthritis seems to be substantially lower in Asian TM joints. This study tested the hypothesis that there are significant differences among human populations in TM joint surface curvature and that populations of Asian descent have less curvature than those of recent European descent.
The sample included trapeziums and first metacarpals from skeletons of 80 individuals of recent European and Asian descent and from skeletons of 34 African and 9 Australian aboriginal individuals. We scanned the surfaces using a laser digitizer to generate 3-dimensional models of each articular surface. We calculated dorsovolar, radioulnar, and root mean square curvatures by fitting modeled quadric surfaces to the TM joint surfaces. We tested pairwise comparisons of mean curvatures between populations for statistical significance using a standard resampling method (ie, bootstrapping). We also made pairwise comparisons of mean curvatures between males and females for a combined African and European sample.
Mean dorsovolar metacarpal curvature was significantly higher in the European sample than in the Asian, African, and Australian samples. Mean root mean square curvature of the trapezial surface was significantly higher in the European sample than in the Asian sample. The European sample had the highest root mean square and dorsovolar trapezial curvatures of all the populations. We found no significant differences between male and female specimens.
A tendency toward higher mean dorsovolar curvature of both the metacarpal and trapezial surface in the European sample may help to explain the higher frequency of TM osteoarthritis reported in Europeans.
The greater TM curvatures affect basal thumb joint mechanics in thumb opposition and therefore may be a factor in the development of osteoarthritis at this joint in Europeans.
Notes
Erratum In: J Hand Surg Am. 2012 May;37(5):1106
PubMed ID
22037298 View in PubMed
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