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1H-NMR metabolomic biomarkers of poor outcome after hemorrhagic shock are absent in hibernators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267428
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107493
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lori K Bogren
Carl J Murphy
Erin L Johnston
Neeraj Sinha
Natalie J Serkova
Kelly L Drew
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107493
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Markers - blood
Hibernation
Lipids - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Metabolome
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reperfusion Injury - blood - prevention & control
Sciuridae
Shock, Hemorrhagic - blood - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Hemorrhagic shock (HS) following trauma is a leading cause of death among persons under the age of 40. During HS the body undergoes systemic warm ischemia followed by reperfusion during medical intervention. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) results in a disruption of cellular metabolic processes that ultimately lead to tissue and organ dysfunction or failure. Resistance to I/R injury is a characteristic of hibernating mammals. The present study sought to identify circulating metabolites in the rat as biomarkers for metabolic alterations associated with poor outcome after HS. Arctic ground squirrels (AGS), a hibernating species that resists I/R injury independent of decreased body temperature (warm I/R), was used as a negative control.
Male Sprague-Dawley rats and AGS were subject to HS by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg and maintaining the low MAP for 20 min before reperfusing with Ringers. The animals' temperature was maintained at 37 ? 0.5 ?C for the duration of the experiment. Plasma samples were taken immediately before hemorrhage and three hours after reperfusion. Hydrophilic and lipid metabolites from plasma were then analyzed via 1H-NMR from unprocessed plasma and lipid extracts, respectively. Rats, susceptible to I/R injury, had a qualitative shift in their hydrophilic metabolic fingerprint including differential activation of glucose and anaerobic metabolism and had alterations in several metabolites during I/R indicative of metabolic adjustments and organ damage. In contrast, I/R injury resistant AGS, regardless of season or body temperature, maintained a stable metabolic homeostasis revealed by a qualitative 1H-NMR metabolic profile with few changes in quantified metabolites during HS-induced global I/R.
An increase in circulating metabolites indicative of anaerobic metabolism and activation of glycolytic pathways is associated with poor prognosis after HS in rats. These same biomarkers are absent in AGS after HS with warm I/R.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25211248 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects--a monozygotic twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165168
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(2):e218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Marko Sysi-Aho
Aila Rissanen
Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso
Hannele Yki-Järvinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Matej Oresic
Author Affiliation
Obesity Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(2):e218
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
Diet Records
Female
Finland
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Lysophosphatidylcholines - blood
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Metabolomics
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Smoking - epidemiology
Sphingomyelins - blood
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24-27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA (% body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17299598 View in PubMed
Less detail

Actinoalloteichus fjordicus sp. nov. isolated from marine sponges: phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genomic characterisation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292492
Source
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2017 Dec; 110(12):1705-1717
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Imen Nouioui
Christian Rückert
Joost Willemse
Gilles P van Wezel
Hans-Peter Klenk
Tobias Busche
Jörn Kalinowski
Harald Bredholt
Sergey B Zotchev
Author Affiliation
School of Biology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK.
Source
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2017 Dec; 110(12):1705-1717
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - chemistry - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Computational Biology - methods
Genes, Bacterial
Genome, Bacterial
Genomics - methods
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Metabolomics - methods
Molecular Sequence Annotation
Multigene Family
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Porifera - microbiology
Secondary Metabolism - genetics
Abstract
Two actinobacterial strains, ADI 127-17T and GBA 129-24, isolated from marine sponges Antho dichotoma and Geodia barretti, respectively, collected at the Trondheim fjord in Norway, were the subjects of a polyphasic study. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequences, the new isolates were preliminarily classified as belonging to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Both strains formed a distinct branch, closely related to the type strains of Actinoalloteichus hoggarensis and Actinoalloteichus hymeniacidonis, within the evolutionary radiation of the genus Actinoalloteichus in the 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic tree. Isolates ADI 127-17T and GBA 129-24 exhibited morphological, chemotaxonomic and genotypic features distinguishable from their close phylogenetic neighbours. Digital DNA: DNA hybridization and ANI values between strains ADI 127-17T and GBA 129-24 were 97.6 and 99.7%, respectively, whereas the corresponding values between both tested strains and type strains of their closely related phylogenetic neighbours, A. hoggarensis and A. hymeniacidonis, were well below the threshold for delineation of prokaryotic species. Therefore, strains ADI 127-17T (= DSM 46855T) and GBA 129-24 (= DSM 46856) are concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Actinoalloteichus for which the name of Actinoalloteichus fjordicus sp. nov. (type strain ADI 127-17T = DSM 46855T = CECT 9355T) is proposed. The complete genome sequences of the new strains were obtained and compared to that of A. hymeniacidonis DSM 45092T and A. hoggarensis DSM 45943T to unravel unique genome features and biosynthetic potential of the new isolates.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28770445 View in PubMed
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Adipocyte morphology and implications for metabolic derangements in acquired obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264941
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Nov;38(11):1423-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
S. Heinonen
L. Saarinen
J. Naukkarinen
A. Rodríguez
G. Frühbeck
A. Hakkarainen
J. Lundbom
N. Lundbom
K. Vuolteenaho
E. Moilanen
P. Arner
S. Hautaniemi
A. Suomalainen
J. Kaprio
A. Rissanen
K H Pietiläinen
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Nov;38(11):1423-31
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipocytes - metabolism
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Body mass index
Body Weight
Energy Metabolism
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Expression
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolome
Obesity - complications - genetics - metabolism
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Adipocyte size and number have been suggested to predict the development of metabolic complications in obesity. However, the genetic and environmental determinants behind this phenomenon remain unclear.
We studied this question in rare-weight discordant (intra-pair difference (?) body mass index (BMI) 3-10 kg m(-2), n=15) and concordant (?BMI 0-2 kg m(-)(2), n=5) young adult (22-35 years) monozygotic twin pairs identified from 10 birth cohorts of Finnish twins (n=5 500 pairs). Subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size from surgical biopsies was measured under a light microscope. Adipocyte number was calculated from cell size and total body fat (D ? A).
The concordant pairs were remarkably similar for adipocyte size and number (intra-class correlations 0.91-0.92, P
PubMed ID
24549139 View in PubMed
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Adverse metabolic risk profiles in Greenlandic Inuit children compared to Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113926
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jun;21(6):1226-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
T. Munch-Andersen
K. Sorensen
L B Andersen
N J Aachmann-Andersen
L. Aksglaede
A. Juul
J W Helge
Author Affiliation
Center for Healthy Aging, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. thormunchandersen@gmail.com
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jun;21(6):1226-31
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adiposity - physiology
Adolescent
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Fasting
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Linear Models
Male
Metabolome
Obesity - blood - ethnology
Overweight - blood - ethnology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
During recent decades, the prevalence of metabolic morbidity has increased rapidly in adult Greenlandic Inuit. To what extent this is also reflected in the juvenile Inuit population is unknown. The objective was, therefore, in the comparison with Danish children, to evaluate metabolic profiles in Greenlandic Inuit children from the capital in the southern and from the northern most villages
187 Inuit and 132 Danish children were examined with anthropometrics, pubertal staging, fasting blood samples, and a maximal aerobic test.
Both Inuit children living in Nuuk and the northern villages had significantly higher glucose, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1 levels, and diastolic blood pressure compared with Danish children after adjustment for differences in adiposity and aerobic fitness levels. The Inuit children living in Nuuk had significantly higher BMI, body fat %, HbA1 c, and significantly lower aerobic fitness and ApoA1 levels than northern living Inuit children.
Greenlandic Inuit children had adverse metabolic health profile compared to the Danish children, the differences where more pronounced in Inuit children living in Nuuk. The tendencies toward higher prevalence of diabetes and metabolic morbidity in the adult Greenlandic Inuit population may also be present in the Inuit children population.
PubMed ID
23670907 View in PubMed
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Bioinformatic approaches reveal metagenomic characterization of soil microbial community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268849
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e93445
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Zhuofei Xu
Martin Asser Hansen
Lars H Hansen
Samuel Jacquiod
Søren J Sørensen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e93445
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Biomarkers
Computational Biology - methods
Ecosystem
Metabolomics - methods
Metagenome
Metagenomics - methods
Microbial Interactions
Phylogeny
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
As is well known, soil is a complex ecosystem harboring the most prokaryotic biodiversity on the Earth. In recent years, the advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has greatly facilitated the progress of soil ecological studies. However, how to effectively understand the underlying biological features of large-scale sequencing data is a new challenge. In the present study, we used 33 publicly available metagenomes from diverse soil sites (i.e. grassland, forest soil, desert, Arctic soil, and mangrove sediment) and integrated some state-of-the-art computational tools to explore the phylogenetic and functional characterizations of the microbial communities in soil. Microbial composition and metabolic potential in soils were comprehensively illustrated at the metagenomic level. A spectrum of metagenomic biomarkers containing 46 taxa and 33 metabolic modules were detected to be significantly differential that could be used as indicators to distinguish at least one of five soil communities. The co-occurrence associations between complex microbial compositions and functions were inferred by network-based approaches. Our results together with the established bioinformatic pipelines should provide a foundation for future research into the relation between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24691166 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of food intake and nutrient status are associated with glucose tolerance status and development of type 2 diabetes in older Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287196
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Nov;106(5):1302-1310
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Otto Savolainen
Mads Vendelbo Lind
Göran Bergström
Björn Fagerberg
Ann-Sofie Sandberg
Alastair Ross
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Nov;106(5):1302-1310
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Diet
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Furans - analysis
Glucose Intolerance
Humans
Logistic Models
Metabolomics
Middle Aged
Propionates - analysis
Prospective Studies
Resorcinols - analysis
Risk factors
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
alpha-Tocopherol - analysis
beta-Alanine - analysis
Abstract
Background: Diet is frequently associated with both the development and prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but there is a lack of objective tools for assessing the relation between diet and T2D. Biomarkers of dietary intake are unconfounded by recall and reporting bias, and using multiple dietary biomarkers could help strengthen the link between a healthy diet and the prevention of T2D.Objective: The objective of this study was to explore how diet is related to glucose tolerance status (GTS) and to future development of T2D irrespective of common T2D and cardiovascular disease risk factors by using multiple dietary biomarkers.Design: Dietary biomarkers were measured in plasma from 64-y-old Swedish women with different GTS [normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 190), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 209), and diabetes (n = 230)]. The same subjects were followed up after 5 y to determine changes in glucose tolerance (n = 167 for NGT, n = 174 for IGT, and n = 159 for diabetes). ANCOVA and logistic regression were used to explore baseline data for associations between dietary biomarkers, GTS, and new T2D cases at follow-up (n = 69).Results: Of the 10 dietary biomarkers analyzed, ß-alanine (beef) (P-raw
PubMed ID
28903960 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of Individual Foods, and Separation of Diets Using Untargeted LC-MS-based Plasma Metabolomics in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300058
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Evrim Acar
Gözde Gürdeniz
Bekzod Khakimov
Francesco Savorani
Sanne Kellebjerg Korndal
Thomas Meinert Larsen
Søren Balling Engelsen
Arne Astrup
Lars O Dragsted
Author Affiliation
Simula Metropolitan Center for Digital Engineering, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Diet
Eating
Fasting
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Norway
Phospholipids - blood - chemistry
Abstract
Self-reported dietary intake does not represent an objective unbiased assessment. The effect of the new Nordic diet (NND) versus average Danish diet (ADD) on plasma metabolic profiles is investigated to identify biomarkers of compliance and metabolic effects.
In a 26-week controlled dietary intervention study, 146 subjects followed either NND, a predominantly organic diet high in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and fish, or ADD, a diet higher in imported and processed foods. Fasting plasma samples are analyzed with untargeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight. It is demonstrated that supervised machine learning with feature selection can separate NND and ADD samples with an average test set performance of up to 0.88 area under the curve. The NND plasma metabolome is characterized by diet-related metabolites, such as pipecolic acid betaine (whole grain), trimethylamine oxide, and prolyl hydroxyproline (both fish intake), while theobromine (chocolate) and proline betaine (citrus) were associated with ADD. Amino acid (i.e., indolelactic acid and hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate) and fat metabolism (butyryl carnitine) characterize ADD whereas NND is associated with higher concentrations of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines.
The plasma metabolite profiles are predictive of dietary patterns and reflected good compliance while indicating effects of potential health benefit, including changes in fat metabolism and glucose utilization.
PubMed ID
30094970 View in PubMed
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Blood plasma metabolites and the risk of developing lung cancer in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118410
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2013 Jul;22(4):335-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Petr G Lokhov
Oxana P Trifonova
Dmitry L Maslov
Alexander I Archakov
Author Affiliation
Department of Proteomics, Institute of Biomedical Chemistry RAMS, Pogodinskaya, Moscow, Russia. lokhovpg@rambler.ru
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2013 Jul;22(4):335-41
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Benzene - analysis
Biotin - analogs & derivatives - blood
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - metabolism
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolomics
Middle Aged
Permethrin - blood
Risk
Russia
Sulfones - blood
Abstract
Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men, and is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Therefore, the identification of specific markers associated with a risk of lung cancer development, particularly metabolites that are more easily assayed, would be very valuable. To this end, ? comparative metabolomics study of blood plasma samples collected from patients with lung cancer (n=100) and controls (n=100) recruited in Moscow was carried out. After the extraction of blood plasma proteins with methanol, the remaining plasma metabolite fractions were analyzed directly using mass spectrometry. Hundreds of cancer-associated metabolites were detected, and at least 70 metabolite ions with odds ratio values of 10-288 were found to be associated with the presence of cancer. Although these metabolites were present at higher levels in cancer patients, particularly in the early stages of disease, they did not correlate positively with cancer progression. On the basis of these findings, this metabolomics study of blood plasma samples from cancer patients shows that numerous cancer-associated metabolites were present in the studied population, and these could be used as factors for calculating the risk of lung cancer development in addition to currently used risk factors.
PubMed ID
23212094 View in PubMed
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Changes in fecal microbiota and metabolomics in a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) responding to two treatment periods with exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281018
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2016 Jun;35(6):1501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Lillemor Berntson
Peter Agback
Johan Dicksved
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2016 Jun;35(6):1501-6
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Juvenile - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Enteral Nutrition
Feces - microbiology
Female
Humans
Metabolomics
Microbiota - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Remission Induction
Sweden
Abstract
The microbiome and immune system of the digestive tract are highly important in both health and disease. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a common anti-inflammatory treatment in children with Crohn's disease in the European countries, and the mechanism is most likely linked to changes in the intestinal microbiome. In the present study, EEN was given in two treatment periods several months apart to a patient with very severe, disabling juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with a remarkable clinical response as the result. The aim of the present study was to study how the EEN treatment influenced the microbiome and metabolome of this patient. Fecal samples from before, during, and between treatments with EEN were studied. The microbiome was analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons using Illumina MiSeq, and the metabolome was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance. The microbiome changed markedly from treatment with EEN, with a strong reduction of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Metabolic profiles showed clear differences before, during, and between treatment with EEN, where butyrate, propionate, and acetate followed a cyclic pattern with the lowest levels at the end of each treatment period. This patient with JIA showed remarkable clinical improvement after EEN treatment, and we found corresponding changes in both the fecal microbiome and the metabolome. Further studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological role of the intestinal canal in children with JIA.
PubMed ID
27021336 View in PubMed
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