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Bone mineral and vitamin D in Aleutian Islanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1626
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1985 Jul; 42(1):143-146.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
R B Mazess
H S Barden
C. Christiansen
A B Harper
W S Laughlin
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1985 Jul; 42(1):143-146.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
St. Paul
Vitamin D metabolites
Calcium
Bone mineral content
Osteoporosis
Diet, traditional
Vitamin D - blood
Sex Factors
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Minerals - metabolism
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Middle Aged
Male
Female
Abstract
Serum concentrations of vitamin D metabolites (chromatography) and bone mineral status (125I absorptiometry) were examined in a group of Aleutian Islanders age 40-75 from St Paul Island, Alaska. Based on 25-(OH)D (16.6 ng/ml) vitamin D status appeared adequate. However, high concentrations of 1,25-(OH)2D (44.3 pg/ml) and very low concentrations of 24,25-(OH)2D3 (0.6 ng/ml) were found. Among females, low bone mineral levels were associated with high concentrations of 1,25-(OH)2D. A low calcium intake in these Aleutians may be responsible for high concentrations of 1,25-(OH)2D and resorption of calcium from bone.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 973.
PubMed ID
4014063 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular effects of mild surface cooling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297290
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-66-1.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1966
, and at each O. 5° C increase in rectal temperature during rewarming. Acute surface cooling of warm-acclimatized dogs liberated specific metabolites and/ or neurohumor s that had a profound cardiovascular effect on cross-circulated normothermic dogs. In similar experiments on cold-acclimatized
  1 document  
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-66-1.
Date
May 1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
776141
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Dogs
Hypothermia
cardiovascular
Cross-circulation
Cold acclimatization
Tissue metabolites
Homeokinesis
Abstract
The cardiovascular effects in normothermic dogs cross-circulated with mildly hypothermic dogs were studied in animals that were warm and cold acclimatized. By this technique it was possible to physiologically dissect the neural responses from the humoral or metabolic factors involved. The cardiac output, limb blood flow, arterial pres sure and heart rate were measured in normothermic dogs at the time of each 0.5° C drop in rectal temperature of dogs that were rendered mildly hypothermic by surface cooling, and at each 0.5° C increase in rectal temperature during rewarming. Acute surface cooling of warm-acclimatized dogs liberated specific metabolites and/or neurohumors that had a profound cardiovascular effect on cross-circulated normothermic dogs. In similar experiments on cold-acclimatized animals, this effect was not observed. It was concluded that cold acclimatization depleted or shifted the cardiovascular threshold response to these metabolites and/or neurohumors.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.66-1
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Clinical aspects of freezing cold injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295220
Source
Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments, Volume 1. Chapter 14. p.429-466.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2002
hypothermia and simultaneous thawing in warm water of the frozen extremity. The danger here is a sudden release of metabolites and the release of excessive amounts of potassium from muscle degradation and injury, which may cause cardioplegia. The imme- diate balance of electrolytes and the restoration of
  1 document  
Author
Mills, William J., Jr.
Author Affiliation
Rear Admiral, Medical Corps, US Navy (Ret)
Source
Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments, Volume 1. Chapter 14. p.429-466.
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
285995
Keywords
Cold Temperature
Hypothermia
Frost bite injury
History
Supercooling
Vasoactive metabolites
Microvascular dysfunction
Pathogenesis
Fasciotomy
Therapeutic treatments
Surgical procedures
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Competitive binding of persistent organic pollutants to the thyroid hormone transport protein transthyretin in glaucous gull ( Larus hyperboreus ).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297153
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. ix, 63, 12 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
ii ABSTRACT The glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) is one of the largest avian top predators in the Arctic. High levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and their metabolites have been detected in the glaucous gull, and several studies indicate that high levels of different POPs
  1 document  
Author
Mortensen, Åse-Karen
Source
Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Department of Biology. ix, 63, 12 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
2569706
Keywords
Arctic
Glaucous gull
Persistent orgnic pollutants (POPS)
Metabolites
Thyroid
Svalbard
Abstract
The glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) is one of the largest avian top predators in the Arctic. High levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and their metabolites have been detected in the glaucous gull, and several studies indicate that high levels of different POPs can contribute to detrimental effects. The mechanism behind these disruptions could be that chemicals interfere with the endocrine system. Thyroid hormones (THs) are important for thermogenesis, reproduction, growth and differentiation. They are transported in the circulation system of glaucous gull mainly bound to the transport proteins globulin, albumin and transthyretin (TTR). The aim of this study was to use molecular modeling to construct a homology model of the TTR in glaucous gull and to dock several well-known and new emerging POPs in the models to predict the binding affinity of POPs to the TH binding site in glaucous gull TTR...
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Erythrocyte alanine amino transferase polymorphism in a Lappish population

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94114
Source
Pages 197-200 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
been studied, all showing a high degree of polymorphism at this locus. The transferase exists in two molecular forms, the soluble form present in the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial form. The enzyme has an important function in the inter- conversion of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolites (2
  1 document  
Author
Virtaranta, K
Kirjarinta, M
Eriksson, AW
Sahi, T
Isokoski, M
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Population Genetics Unit, Helsinki, Finland
Institute of Human Genetics, Free University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Department of Public Health Science, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
Source
Pages 197-200 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alanine amino transferase
Amino acid metabolites
Autosomal locus
Carbohydrate metabolites
Caucasian populations
Codominant alleles
Cytoplasm
Finnish Lapps
Glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT)
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Interconversion
Norwegian Lapps
Parental bands
Phenotypes
Polymorphism
Pyridoxal phosphate
Red cell enzyme
Silent allele
Utsjoki Lapps
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Source
Lichen Secondary Metabolites, B. Rankovic (ed.) : Springer International Publishing : Chapter 2.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
in traditional medicine are most commonly used for treating wounds, skin disorders, respiratory and digestive issues, and obstetric and gynecological concerns. They have been used for both their secondary metabolites and their storage carbohydrates. The European uses of lichens have been exported
  1 document  
Author
Crawford, Stuart D.
Source
Lichen Secondary Metabolites, B. Rankovic (ed.) : Springer International Publishing : Chapter 2.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
4078580
Keywords
Traditional medicine
Lichens
Secondary metabolites
Storage carbohydrates
Abstract
Lichens are used in traditional medicines by cultures across the world, particularly in temperate and arctic regions. Knowledge of these medicinal uses is available to us because of the contributions of traditional knowledge holders in these cultures.
The traditional medicinal uses of 52 lichen genera are summarized in this paper. Cultures in different regions of the world tend to emphasize different lichen genera in their traditional medicines, with Usnea being the most widely used genus. The folk taxonomy of lichens within a given culture is not synonymous with the scientific taxonomy and reflects the cultural value of those lichens and the traditional method of their identification. Even within western science the identity and taxonomy of lichens have not remained constant throughout history.
Lichens in traditional medicine are most commonly used for treating wounds, skin disorders, respiratory and digestive issues, and obstetric and gynecological concerns. They have been used for both their secondary metabolites and their storage carbohydrates. The European uses of lichens have been exported worldwide and sometimes influence the use of lichens by other cultures. These European uses started in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and arose from interpretations of Ancient Greek uses, as well as the application of the doctrine of signatures.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.