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107 records – page 1 of 11.

Abdominal obesity is essential for the risk of venous thromboembolism in the metabolic syndrome: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154041
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):739-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
K H Borch
S K Braekkan
E B Mathiesen
I. Njølstad
T. Wilsgaard
J. Størmer
J-B Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Center for Atherothrombotic Research in Tromsø, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø Norway. knut.borch@fagmed.uit.no
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):739-45
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - complications
Abstract
The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, including abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and all cause mortality.
The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of the metabolic syndrome, and its individual components, on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a prospective population-based study.
Individual components of the metabolic syndrome were registered in 6170 subjects aged 25-84 years in the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995, and first ever VTE events were registered until 1 September 2007.
The metabolic syndrome was present in 21.9% (1350 subjects) of the population. There were 194 validated first VTE events (2.92 per 1000 person-years) during a mean of 10.8 years of follow-up. Presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of VTE (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.23) in age- and gender-adjusted analysis. The risk of VTE increased with the number of components in the metabolic syndrome (P
Notes
Comment In: J Thromb Haemost. 2009 May;7(5):736-819245417
PubMed ID
19036065 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria, metabolic syndrome and the risk of mortality and cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90754
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Solbu Marit D
Kronborg Jens
Jenssen Trond G
Njølstad Inger
Løchen Maja-Lisa
Mathiesen Ellisiv B
Wilsgaard Tom
Eriksen Bjørn O
Toft Ingrid
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. marit.solbu@unn.no
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Creatinine - urine
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Increased urinary albumin-excretion is a cardiovascular risk-factor. The cardiovascular risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is debated. The aim of the present prospective, population-based study of non-diabetic individuals was to examine the association between low-grade urinary albumin-excretion, MetS, and cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. METHODS: 5215 non-diabetic, non-proteinuric men and women participating in the Tromsø Study 1994-1995 were included. Urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured in three urine samples. The participants were categorized into four groups by the presence/absence of MetS (the International Diabetes Federation definition) and ACR in the upper tertile (>or=0.75 mg/mmol). RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 9.6 years for first ever myocardial infarction, 9.7 years for ischemic stroke and 12.4 years for mortality. High ACR (upper tertile)/MetS was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio (HR) 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30-2.37, por=0.75 mg/mmol was associated with cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality independently of MetS. MetS was not associated with any end-point beyond what was predicted from its components. Thus, low-grade albuminuria, but not MetS, may be used for risk stratification in non-diabetic subjects.
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):348-9; author reply 350-119201409
PubMed ID
19091314 View in PubMed
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[Antihypertensive therapy in the elderly patients with metabolic syndrome].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112661
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Mar;334(3):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
V V Sergeeva
A Iu Rodionova
T A Bobyleva
M B Patsenko
A P Popov
R A Liferov
A A Mikhailov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Mar;334(3):26-31
Date
Mar-2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Arterial Pressure - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - drug therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Russia
Abstract
The article is concerned with modern methods of assessment of arterial hypertension in patients with metabolic syndrome and characteristics of modern antihypertensive drugs and its combinations necessary for the elderly. The authors gave their own example of treatment of more than 2000 patients with arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome.
PubMed ID
23808212 View in PubMed
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Asian ethnicity and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritic total knee arthroplasty population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152119
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2010 Apr;25(3):416-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Rajiv Gandhi
Fahad Razak
Peggy Tso
J Roderick Davey
Nizar N Mahomed
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Arthroplasty. 2010 Apr;25(3):416-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Female
Humans
Knee Prosthesis
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology - ethnology
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - surgery
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a known risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA). We asked whether the prevalence of MS varies across ethnicity among patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for end-stage OA. In our population of 1460 patients undergoing primary knee arthroplasty, MS was defined as body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2), diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Among the 1334 white patients, 114 (8.5%) had MS as compared with 3 of 36 (8.3%) blacks and 18 of 90 (20%) Asians (P = .006) Adjusted analysis showed that those of Asian ethnicity had a 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.8; P = .03) times greater odds of MS as compared with those of other ethnicity. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for OA, and Asians demonstrate a greater prevalence of MS as compared with whites and blacks in this population.
PubMed ID
19278817 View in PubMed
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Association of liver enzymes with metabolic syndrome and carotid atherosclerosis in young adults. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137714
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Mar;44(2):187-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Juha Koskinen
Costan G Magnussen
Mika Kähönen
Britt-Marie Loo
Jukka Marniemi
Antti Jula
Liisa A Saarikoski
Risto Huupponen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, Turku, Finland. jkkosk@utu.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Mar;44(2):187-95
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - metabolism
Atherosclerosis - etiology
Biological Markers - metabolism
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - etiology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Fatty Liver - etiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Liver - enzymology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - enzymology
Risk
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - metabolism
Abstract
We examined whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) predicts increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels in young adults, whether spontaneous recovery from MetS has a favorable effect on liver enzyme activities, and whether these enzymes contribute to the atherogenicity of MetS (assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT)).
The study included 1,553 subjects (base-line age 31.5 ± 5.0 years). ALT and GGT were measured in 2007. MetS was diagnosed by the new Joint Interim Societies definition.
ALT and GGT levels were higher in subjects with MetS compared to those without in 2007. The association was independent of alcohol intake and BMI. In multivariable models adjusted for base-line age, LDL cholesterol, CRP, alcohol intake, and adiponectin, MetS in 2001 predicted increased ALT (ß ± SEM = 0.320 ± 0.062, P
PubMed ID
21254896 View in PubMed
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A Bayesian Network analysis of the probabilistic relations between risk factors in the predisposition to type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276568
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2015;2015:2119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Francesco Sambo
Barbara Di Camillo
Alberto Franzin
Andrea Facchinetti
Liisa Hakaste
Jasmina Kravic
Giuseppe Fico
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Leif Groop
Rafael Gabriel
Tiinamaija Tuomi
Claudio Cobelli
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2015;2015:2119-22
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bayes Theorem
Databases, Factual
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Finland
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications
Models, Statistical
Risk factors
Spain
Abstract
In order to better understand the relations between different risk factors in the predisposition to type 2 diabetes, we present a Bayesian Network analysis of a large dataset, composed of three European population studies. Our results show, together with a key role of metabolic syndrome and of glucose after 2 hours of an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, the importance of education, measured as the number of years of study, in the predisposition to type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
26736707 View in PubMed
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Binge-eating disorder in the Swedish national registers: Somatic comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283867
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2017 Jan;50(1):58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
LM Thornton
HJ Watson
A. Jangmo
E. Welch
C. Wiklund
Y. von Hausswolff-Juhlin
C. Norring
BK Herman
H. Larsson
CM Bulik
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2017 Jan;50(1):58-65
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Binge-Eating Disorder - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate associations between binge-eating disorder (BED) and somatic illnesses and determine whether medical comorbidities are more common in individuals who present with BED and comorbid obesity.
Cases (n?=?850) were individuals with a BED diagnosis in the Swedish eating disorders quality registers. Ten community controls were matched to each case on sex, and year, month, and county of birth. Associations of BED status with neurologic, immune, respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, musculoskeletal, genitourinary, circulatory, and endocrine system diseases were evaluated using conditional logistic regression models. We further examined these associations by adjusting for lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. Amongst individuals with BED, we explored whether comorbid obesity was associated with risk of somatic disorders.
BED was associated with most classes of diseases evaluated; strongest associations were with diabetes [odds ratio (95% confidence interval)?=?5.7 (3.8; 8.7)] and circulatory systems [1.9 (1.3; 2.7)], likely indexing components of metabolic syndrome. Amongst individuals with BED, those with comorbid obesity were more likely to have a lifetime history of respiratory [1.5 (1.1; 2.1)] and gastrointestinal [2.6 (1.7; 4.1)] diseases than those without comorbid obesity. Increased risk of some somatic disease classes in individuals with BED was not simply due to obesity or other lifetime psychiatric comorbidity.
The association of BED with many somatic illnesses highlights the morbidity experienced by individuals with BED. Clinicians treating patients with BED should be vigilant for medical comorbidities. Nonpsychiatric providers may be the first clinical contact for those with BED underscoring the importance of screening in primary care. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Eating Disorders Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:58-65).
Notes
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PubMed ID
27642179 View in PubMed
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Cardiometabolic risk in Canada: a detailed analysis and position paper by the cardiometabolic risk working group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135666
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Mar-Apr;27(2):e1-e33
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lawrence A Leiter
David H Fitchett
Richard E Gilbert
Milan Gupta
G B John Mancini
Philip A McFarlane
Robert Ross
Hwee Teoh
Subodh Verma
Sonia Anand
Kathryn Camelon
Chi-Ming Chow
Jafna L Cox
Jean-Pierre Després
Jacques Genest
Stewart B Harris
David C W Lau
Richard Lewanczuk
Peter P Liu
Eva M Lonn
Ruth McPherson
Paul Poirier
Shafiq Qaadri
Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret
Simon W Rabkin
Arya M Sharma
Andrew W Steele
James A Stone
Jean-Claude Tardif
Sheldon Tobe
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Mar-Apr;27(2):e1-e33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
The concepts of "cardiometabolic risk," "metabolic syndrome," and "risk stratification" overlap and relate to the atherogenic process and development of type 2 diabetes. There is confusion about what these terms mean and how they can best be used to improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention. With the objectives of clarifying these concepts and presenting practical strategies to identify and reduce cardiovascular risk in multiethnic patient populations, the Cardiometabolic Working Group reviewed the evidence related to emerging cardiovascular risk factors and Canadian guideline recommendations in order to present a detailed analysis and consolidated approach to the identification and management of cardiometabolic risk. The concepts related to cardiometabolic risk, pathophysiology, and strategies for identification and management (including health behaviours, pharmacotherapy, and surgery) in the multiethnic Canadian population are presented. "Global cardiometabolic risk" is proposed as an umbrella term for a comprehensive list of existing and emerging factors that predict cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Health behaviour interventions (weight loss, physical activity, diet, smoking cessation) in people identified at high cardiometabolic risk are of critical importance given the emerging crisis of obesity and the consequent epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Vascular protective measures (health behaviours for all patients and pharmacotherapy in appropriate patients) are essential to reduce cardiometabolic risk, and there is growing consensus that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to adequately address cardiometabolic risk factors. Health care professionals must also consider risk factors related to ethnicity in order to appropriately evaluate everyone in their diverse patient populations.
PubMed ID
21459257 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk according to plasma apolipoprotein and lipid profiles in a Canadian First Nation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138077
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2010 Dec;31(1):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
N D Riediger
S G Bruce
T K Young
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. umriedin@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2010 Dec;31(1):33-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Lipids - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite high diabetes rates among Canadian First Nations people, little is known about their cardiovascular disease risk. Our aim was to describe the apolipoprotein profile with respect to cardiovascular risk in a Canadian First Nation community.
In 2003, a representative sample of adult members of a Manitoba First Nation (N = 483) participated in a screening study for diabetes and diabetes complications. We assessed their cardiovascular risk factors.
Sixty percent of women were at increased cardiovascular risk because of low apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels, compared with 35% of men. The proportion of women with low apoA1 levels decreased with age, but the proportion with low high-density lipoprotein levels remained stable across age groups. Both apoB and apoA1 were significantly associated with obesity when age, sex, diastolic blood pressure, homocysteine, diabetes, and insulin resistance were controlled for.
Apolipoprotein and lipid profiles in this First Nation population suggest high cardiovascular risk. Future research should characterize the lipoprotein particle size in this population.
PubMed ID
21213617 View in PubMed
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[Cardiovascular risk and metabolic syndrome in youth: Canadian perspectives].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150183
Source
Arch Pediatr. 2009 Jun;16(6):689-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
M. Lambert
Author Affiliation
Service de Génétique Médicale, Département de Pédiatrie, Université de Montréal et CHU Sainte-Justine, 3175 Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montréal, Québec, Canada. marie.lambert@umontreal.ca
Source
Arch Pediatr. 2009 Jun;16(6):689-91
Date
Jun-2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications
Risk factors
PubMed ID
19541131 View in PubMed
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107 records – page 1 of 11.