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Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero and subsequent plasma lipids, ApoB, and CRP among adult women in the MoBa cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122454
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Nov;120(11):1532-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Rolv Skjaerven
Kjell Haug
Gregory S Travlos
Ralph E Wilson
Merete Eggesbø
Jane A Hoppin
Kristina W Whitworth
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. cupuluicabl@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Nov;120(11):1532-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent findings suggest that maternal smoking during pregnancy may play a role in the development of metabolic alterations in offspring during childhood. However, whether such exposure increases the risk of developing similar metabolic alterations during adulthood is uncertain.
We evaluated the association of in utero exposure to maternal tobacco smoke with plasma lipids, apolipoprotein B (apoB), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in adulthood.
The study was based on a subsample of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and included 479 pregnant women with plasma lipids, apoB, and CRP measurements. Information on in utero exposure to tobacco smoke, personal smoking, and other factors were obtained from the women by a self-completed questionnaire at enrollment, at approximately 17 weeks of gestation.
Women exposed to tobacco smoke in utero had higher triglycerides [10.7% higher; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.9, 17.9] and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (-1.9 mg/dL; 95% CI: -4.3, 0.5) compared with unexposed women, after adjusting for age, physical activity, education, personal smoking, and current body mass index (BMI). Exposed women were also more likely to have triglycerides = 200 mg/dL [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.3, 5.1] and HDL
Notes
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PubMed ID
22814200 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Danish patients with HIV infection: the effect of antiretroviral therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99000
Source
HIV Med. 2009 Jul;10(6):378-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
B R Hansen
J. Petersen
S B Haugaard
S. Madsbad
N. Obel
Y. Suzuki
O. Andersen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Kettegaard Allé 30, Hvidovre DK-2650, Denmark. brhansen@dadlnet.dk
Source
HIV Med. 2009 Jul;10(6):378-87
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - blood - drug therapy
HIV-1
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a subject of debate. We investigated the prevalence of MS in a cohort of Danish HIV-infected patients and estimated the effect of the various classes of antiretroviral therapies on the prevalence of MS and its components. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in which data were obtained from fasting blood tests, anthropometry, an interview questionnaire and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans. MS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: Five hundred and sixty-six patients were included in the study, of whom 27% were diagnosed with MS. In univariate analysis, the duration of treatment with different drug classes was associated with the prevalence of MS. In multivariate analysis, no association was demonstrated between therapeutic duration or modality and the occurrence of MS. Current nonthymidine reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and protease inhibitor (PI) therapies were both associated with increased plasma triglycerides (TG) [odds ratio (OR) 3.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.73-6.74; and OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.19-3.22, respectively]. CONCLUSIONS: MS is prevalent in HIV-infected Danes. However, treatment with specific drug classes does not seem to confer an elevated risk for MS, other than the risk conferred by known acute effects on triglycerides.
PubMed ID
19490178 View in PubMed
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