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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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The added value of a brief self-efficacy coaching on the effectiveness of a 12-week physical activity program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117957
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jan Seghers
Ann-Sophie Van Hoecke
Astrid Schotte
Joke Opdenacker
Filip Boen
Author Affiliation
Dept of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Health Education - methods
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Metabolic Equivalent - physiology
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Efficacy
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-efficacy has been found to be an important precondition for behavioral change in sedentary people. The current study examined the effectiveness and added value of including a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a 12-week lifestyle physical activity (PA) program.
Participants were randomly assigned to a standard-intervention group (without additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 116) or extra-intervention group (with additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 111). Body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular fitness, self-reported PA, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention period. Perceived adherence to the PA program was assessed postintervention.
At posttest, a significant increase in cardiovascular fitness and decrease in BMI were found in both groups. Significant intervention effects emerged on PA behavior, self-efficacy, and program adherence, in favor of the extra-intervention group. Self-efficacy mediated the intervention effect on program adherence whereas no evidence was found for its role as mediator of PA change.
Adding a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a lifestyle PA program is a promising strategy to enhance the intervention effects on PA behavior, self-efficacy beliefs, and program adherence. However, the role of self-efficacy as mediator of the intervention effect on in PA was not fully supported.
PubMed ID
23249643 View in PubMed
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Cardiorespiratory fitness and nonfatalcardiovascular events: A population-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282963
Source
Am Heart J. 2017 Feb;184:55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Hassan Khan
Nabil Jaffar
Rainer Rauramaa
Sudhir Kurl
Kai Savonen
Jari A Laukkanen
Source
Am Heart J. 2017 Feb;184:55-61
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - blood
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Exercise
Exercise Test
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Oxygen consumption
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the prognostic value of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with risk of first major nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and heart failure (HF) events.
Cardiorespiratory fitness, as measured by maximal oxygen uptake, was assessed at baseline in a prospective cohort of 2,089 men aged 42 to 61years.
During a mean (SD) follow-up of 19.1(8.4) years, 522 nonfatal acute MI events, 198 acute all-cause nonfatal stroke events, and 221 nonfatal HF events were recorded. The hazard ratio per 1-metabolic-equivalent increase in CRF was 0.93 (95% CI 0.88-0.97) for nonfatal MI, 0.94 (95% CI0.87-1.01) for nonfatal stroke, and 0.84 (95% CI 0.78-0.91) for nonfatal HF events after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, smoking, alcohol use, serum creatinine, low-density lipoprotein levels, physical activity, and socioeconomic status). Further adjustment for left ventricular hypertrophy and resting heart rate did not attenuate these associations. Addition of CRF to conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors significantly improved both discrimination (C index) and category free net reclassification index (cf-NRI) for nonfatal MI (change in C index, 0.015 [95% CI 0.010-0.020] and change in cf-NRI 0.27, P
PubMed ID
27892887 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular fitness and mortality after contemporary cardiac rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114199
Source
Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 May;88(5):455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Billie-Jean Martin
Ross Arena
Mark Haykowsky
Trina Hauer
Leslie D Austford
Merril Knudtson
Sandeep Aggarwal
James A Stone
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiac Sciences, Libin Cardiovascular Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 May;88(5):455-63
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
To assess the association between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and outcomes in a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) cohort.
We conducted a retrospective study of 5641 patients (4282 men [76%] and 1359 women [24%]; mean ± SD age, 60.0±10.3 years) with coronary artery disease who participated in CR between July 1, 1996, and February 28, 2009. Based on peak metabolic equivalents (METs), patients were classified as low fitness (LFit) (8 METs).
Baseline fitness predicted long-term mortality: relative to the LFit group, patients with moderate fitness had an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.54 (95% CI, 0.42-0.69), and those with high fitness a hazard ratio of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.24-0.44). Improvement in CRF at 12 weeks was associated with decreased overall mortality, with a 13% point reduction with each MET increase (P
Notes
Comment In: Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 May;88(5):431-723639495
PubMed ID
23639499 View in PubMed
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Chronic workplace stress and insufficient physical activity: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120339
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jan;70(1):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Anne Kouvonen
Jussi Vahtera
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Ari K P Väänänen
Tarja Heponiemi
Paula Salo
Marianna Virtanen
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
School of Sociology, Social Policy & Social Work, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK and Centre of Excellence for Public Health (NI), Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK. a.kouvonen@qub.ac.uk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Jan;70(1):3-8
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Employment
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Prospective Studies
Reward
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workplace
Abstract
To examine whether exposure to workplace stressors predicts changes in physical activity and the risk of insufficient physical activity.
Prospective data from the Finnish Public Sector Study. Repeated exposure to low job control, high job demands, low effort, low rewards and compositions of these (job strain and effort-reward imbalance) were assessed at Time 1 (2000-2002) and Time 2 (2004). Insufficient physical activity (
PubMed ID
23014593 View in PubMed
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Cross-country skiing is associated with lower all-cause mortality: A population-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294207
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Mar; 28(3):1064-1072
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
J A Laukkanen
T Laukkanen
S K Kunutsor
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Mar; 28(3):1064-1072
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Mortality
Risk factors
Skiing
Abstract
The prospective relationship between leisure-time cross-country skiing and any fatal events is uncertain. We aimed to assess the associations of leisure-time cross-country skiing habits with the risk of all-cause mortality in a general population. A 12-month physical activity questionnaire was used at baseline to assess the frequency, average duration, and intensity of cross-country skiing in a prospective population-based cohort of 2087 middle-aged men from eastern Finland. Hazard ratios (HRs; 95% confidence intervals) were calculated for all-cause mortality. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 26.1 (18.7-28.0) years, 1028 all-cause mortality outcomes were recorded. In analyses adjusted for several established risk factors and other potential confounders, when compared to men who did not do any cross-country skiing, the HRs (95% CIs) of all-cause mortality were 0.84 (0.73-0.97) and 0.80 (0.67-0.96) for men who did 1-200 and >200 metabolic equivalent-hours per year of cross-country skiing, respectively. Similarly, compared to men who did not do any cross-country skiing, the corresponding adjusted HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality were 0.84 (0.72-0.97) and 0.82 (0.69-0.97) for men who did 1-60 min/wk and >60 min/wk of cross-country skiing, respectively. The associations were similar across several subgroups, except for evidence of effect modification by body mass index and history of diabetes. Total volume as well as duration of leisure-time cross-country skiing is each inversely and independently associated with all-cause mortality in a middle-aged Caucasian male population.
PubMed ID
28921697 View in PubMed
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Decomposing social capital inequalities in health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256937
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Mar;68(3):233-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Spencer Moore
Steven Stewart
Ana Teixeira
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, 28 Division St., , Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Mar;68(3):233-8
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Canada - epidemiology
Censuses
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - psychology
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Metabolic Equivalent - physiology
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Social Class
Social Determinants of Health
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Research has shown network social capital associated with a range of health behaviours and conditions. Little is known about what social capital inequalities in health represent, and which social factors contribute to such inequalities.
Data come from the Montreal Neighbourhood Networks and Healthy Aging Study (n=2707). A position generator was used to collect network data on social capital. Health outcomes included self-reported health (SRH), physical inactivity, and hypertension. Social capital inequalities in low SRH, physical inactivity, and hypertension were decomposed into demographic, socioeconomic, network and psychosocial determinants. The percentage contributions of each in explaining health disparities were calculated.
Across the three outcomes, higher educational attainment contributed most consistently to explaining social capital inequalities in low SRH (% C=30.8%), physical inactivity (15.9%), and hypertension (51.2%). Social isolation, contributed to physical inactivity (11.7%) and hypertension (18.2%). Sense of control (24.9%) and perceived cohesion (11.5%) contributed to low SRH. Age reduced or increased social capital inequalities in hypertension depending on the age category.
Interventions that include strategies to reduce socioeconomic inequalities and increase actual and perceived social connectivity may be most successful in reducing social capital inequalities in health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24258198 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms are associated with lower bone mineral density in young adults with high job strain. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256586
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2014 Jun;21(3):464-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M. Oikonen
M. Hintsanen
M. Laaksonen
V. Mikkilä
M. Kähönen
T. Lehtimäki
L. Pulkki-Råback
J S A Viikari
L. Keltikangas-Järvinen
O T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, 20520, Turku, Finland, mervi.oikonen@utu.fi.
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2014 Jun;21(3):464-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Body mass index
Bone Density - physiology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Workload - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Job strain has been associated with depressive symptoms, and depression has been associated with low bone mineral density (BMD).
The associations between BMD and job strain have not been studied. We examined the relations between BMD, job strain, and depressive symptoms in a population-based group of young adults in Finland.
Ultrasonic measurement of BMD at the calcaneus was performed on 777 participants (men 45 %, aged 30-45) drawn from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Job strain was assessed by self-administered questionnaires by the combination of job demands and job control. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a modified Beck Depression Inventory. The effects of job strain on BMD were studied with multivariable analyses with age, sex, BMI, vitamin D, and calcium intake, physical activity, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms as covariates.
Depressive symptoms were independently associated with lower BMD T score in participants with high job strain (ß =?-0.241, p = 0.02), but depressive symptoms were not significantly associated with BMD in the low (ß =?-0.160, p = 0.26) and intermediate (ß = -0.042, p = 0.66) job strain categories.
The results suggest that job strain modifies the association between depressive symptoms and BMD. Depressed individuals with high work-related stress might be in increased risk of lower bone mineral density.
PubMed ID
23780845 View in PubMed
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Exercise on prescription: changes in physical activity and health-related quality of life in five Danish programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144403
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):56-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Jan Sørensen
Jes Bak Sørensen
Thomas Skovgaard
Thomas Bredahl
Lis Puggaard
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Health Services Research and Technology Assessment, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. jas@cast.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):56-62
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Denmark
Exercise Therapy - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Abstract
Exercise prescribed by the general practitioner may be an important health-improving intervention for inactive individuals with lifestyle diseases. The objective was to analyse changes in physical activity and health-related quality of life among participants in five similar 'Exercise on Prescription' (EoP) programmes.
The analysis was based on self-reported information in a follow-up design without a control group. The intervention comprised group training twice weekly in the first 2 months and once weekly in the following 2 months (24 sessions in all) combined with four to five sessions of motivational counselling. Self-report questionnaires were administered at the first contact and again after 4, 10 and 16 months. Outcome measures were changes in self-reported activity levels converted to metabolic equivalents and health-related quality of life measured by standard instruments (SF-12v2 and EQ-5D).
449 individuals (59% women, mean age 57 years) agreed to participate in the study. Dropout was considerable [123 (27%); 231 (52%) 297 (66%) after 4, 10 and 16 months]. Participants increased their physical activity level and health-related quality of life from baseline to 4 months and maintained improvement throughout the observation period. One in three to six participants increased their physical activity level and one in 4-10 achieved improvements in health-related quality of life.
Exercise on prescription can contribute to improvements in physical activity level and health-related quality of life in physically inactive patients with or at increased risk of developing lifestyle diseases. An acceptable number of participants achieved and maintained improvements in physical activity level and health-related quality of life.
PubMed ID
20371500 View in PubMed
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The impact of physical activity on physical health functioning--a prospective study among middle-aged employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145215
Source
Prev Med. 2010 May-Jun;50(5-6):246-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jouni Lahti
Mikko Laaksonen
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jouni.mm.lahti@helsinki.fi
Source
Prev Med. 2010 May-Jun;50(5-6):246-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Body mass index
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Exercise - physiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Physical Fitness
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine whether physical activity contributes to physical health functioning five to seven years later among middle-aged employees.
Baseline data were collected in 2000-2002 by questionnaire surveys among 40-60-year-old employees of Helsinki City. A follow-up survey was conducted among baseline respondents in 2007 (n=7330, response rate 83%). Physical activity during leisure time or commuting within the previous 12 months was asked at baseline. Physical health functioning was measured by physical component summary (PCS) of the Short-Form 36 questionnaire. PCS mean scores were examined, as were poor and good PCS scores.
Vigorously active and conditioning exercisers had better subsequent physical health functioning than did the inactive and moderately active. Baseline health and functioning explained a major part of the differences found. Smoking, alcohol use and BMI further explained some of the differences. No clear differences in physical health functioning mean scores emerged during follow-up. In good physical health functioning, however some differences between conditioning and inactive women remained after adjustments.
Prospective associations between physical activity and physical health functioning were relatively weak, but high physical activity may help in maintaining good physical health functioning. Vigorous activity may be more beneficial than moderate activity.
PubMed ID
20184919 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.