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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: development from 1904 and mortality to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210233
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F D Liddell
A D McDonald
J C McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper draws together the mortality experience for a cohort of some 11000 male Quebec Chrysotile miners and millers, reported at intervals since 1971 and now again updated. Of the 10918 men in the complete cohort, 1138 were lost to view, almost all never traced after employment of only a month or two before 1935; the other 9780 men were traced into 1992. Of these, 8009 (82%) are known to have died: 657 from lung cancer, 38 from mesotheliona, 1205 from other malignant disease, 108 from pneumoconiosis and 561 from other non-malignant respiratory diseases (excluding tuberculosis). After early fluctuations. SMRs (all causes) against Quebec rates have been reasonably steady since about 1945. For men first employed in Asbestos, mine or factory, they were very much what might have been expected for a blue collar population without any hazardous exposure. SMRs in the Thetford Mines area were almost 8% higher, but in line with anecdotal evidence concerning socio-economic status. At exposures below 300 (million particles per cubic foot) x years, (mpcf.y), equivalent to roughly 1000 (fibres/ml) x years-or, say, 10 years in the 1940s at 80 (fibres/ml)-findings were as follows. There were no discernible associations of degree of exposure and SMRs, whether for all causes of death or for all the specific cancer sites examined. The average SMRs were 1.07 (all causes), and 1.16, 0.93, 1.03 and 1.21, respectively, for gastric, other abdominal, laryngeal and lung cancer. Men whose exposures were less then 300 mpcf.y suffered almost one-half of the 146 deaths from pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma; the elimination of these two causes would have reduced these men's SMR (all causes) from 1.07 to approximately 1.06. Thus it is concluded from the viewpoint of mortality that exposure in this industry to less than 300 mpcf.y has been essentially innocuous, although there was a small risk or pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma. Higher exposures have, however, led to excesses, increasing with degree of exposure, of mortality from all causes, and from lung cancer and stomach cancer, but such exposures, of at least 300 mpcf.y, are several orders of magnitude more severe than any that have been seen for many years. The effects of cigarette smoking were much more deleterious than those of dust exposure, not only for lung cancer (the SMR for smokers of 20+ cigarettes a day being 4.6 times higher than that for non-smokers), but also for stomach cancer (2.0 times higher), laryngeal cancer (2.9 times higher), and-most importantly-for all causes (1.6 times higher).
Notes
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):3-129072948
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Jun;45(4):329-35; author reply 336-811414250
PubMed ID
9072947 View in PubMed
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Source
J Toxicol Environ Health. 1980 Sep-Nov;6(5-6):1261-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
M S Huuskonen
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health. 1980 Sep-Nov;6(5-6):1261-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
Mesothelioma - etiology
Neoplasms - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Sputum - cytology
Abstract
Cancer mortality of men with diagnosed asbestosis was studied in Finland. Of the 174 men registered as having asbestosis, 56 had died before 1977, whereas the number of expected deaths based on the Finnish male population was only 23.4. The respective figures for lung cancer were 19 observed and 2.1 expected. The mean age of these 19 lung cancer patients was 57.8 yr, and lung cancer was the cause of death (underlying cause) in 35% of all diseased men with asbestosis. The proportion of lung cancer mortality from all deaths among Finnish men 55-64 yr old is 10.8%, which is clearly lower than that among the men with asbestosis. No excess of other malignancies was found in Finland among workers with asbestosis.
PubMed ID
7463518 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Nov 19;152(47):3520-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-19-1990
Author
P. Lange
S. Balk-Møller
Author Affiliation
Bispebjerg Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Nov 19;152(47):3520-4
Date
Nov-19-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestosis - etiology
Carcinoma, Bronchogenic - chemically induced
Denmark
English Abstract
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced
Mesothelioma - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Pleural Diseases - etiology
Pleural Effusion - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - chemically induced
Abstract
Asbestos fibres have potent cancerogenic and fibrogenic properties and may lead to development of cancer and fibrosis in the lung parenchyma and pleura. The Danish Ministry of Employment has established rules which should prevent development of disease when working with asbestos in future but, on account of the very long latent period between exposure and development of asbestos-related disease, these conditions will still occur during the next 30-40 years. Primarily, the more benign pleural plaques will be concerned but serious disease such as bronchial carcinoma and pleural mesothelioma will occur in the future. When patients are encountered who present symptoms or objective/paraclinical findings which are compatible with disease produced by asbestos, it is important to remember that exposure to asbestos may be many decades ago and, particularly where the malignant conditions are concerned, exposure need not have been particularly massive or prolonged. All cases where asbestos-related disease is suspected should be notified to the insurance administration.
PubMed ID
2256205 View in PubMed
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Chrysotile, tremolite, and mesothelioma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215812
Source
Science. 1995 Feb 10;267(5199):776-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1995

Different measures of asbestos exposure in estimating risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma among construction workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187258
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Dec;44(12):1190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Kari Koskinen
Eero Pukkala
Rami Martikainen
Kari Reijula
Antti Karjalainen
Author Affiliation
Uusimaa Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Dec;44(12):1190-6
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - radiography
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - radiography
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To analyze occupation, expert-evaluated cumulative exposure, and radiographic abnormalities as indicators of asbestos-related cancer risk we followed 16,696 male construction workers for cancer in 1990-2000. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) in comparison to the Finnish population and relative risks (RR) in a multivariate analysis in comparison to the internal low-exposure category of each indicator. Overall, the risk was increased for mesothelioma (SIR 2.0, 95% CI = 1.0-3.3), but not for lung cancer (SIR 1.1, 95% CI = 0.9-1.2). Radiographic lung fibrosis indicated a 2-fold and a high value of the exposure index a 3-fold RR of lung cancer, while there was no risk among those with pleural plaques. The risk of lung cancer was the highest in insulators (RR 3.7, 95% CI = 1.4-9.9). Occupation, expert-evaluated cumulative exposure, and lung fibrosis are useful indicators of lung cancer risk among construction workers.
PubMed ID
12500463 View in PubMed
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Fiber concentration in lung tissue of patients with malignant mesothelioma. A case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26568
Source
Cancer. 1985 Sep 1;56(5):1089-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1985
Author
G. Mowé
B. Gylseth
F. Hartveit
V. Skaug
Source
Cancer. 1985 Sep 1;56(5):1089-93
Date
Sep-1-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Lung - analysis
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - metabolism
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Diseases - etiology - metabolism
Pleural Neoplasms - etiology - metabolism
Probability
Risk
Abstract
The risk of malignant mesothelioma associated with low-level asbestos exposure is an important unresolved issue today. We have analyzed the asbestos fiber concentration in lung tissue from 14 cases of malignant mesothelioma and 28 case-matched controls by scanning electron microscopy. The cases represent 86% of all mesotheliomas recorded by the Cancer Registry of Norway from the county of Hordaland between 1970 and 1979. Based on 1 million fibers per g of dried tissue as an indicator of cumulated asbestos exposure, the odds ratio (relative risk) was 8.5 (95% confidence limits, 2.3-31.1). Assuming that the risk of malignant mesothelioma is related to mineral fiber concentration in lung tissue, it is concluded that a fiber concentration exceeding 1 million fibers per g of dried tissue is associated with an increased risk of malignant mesothelioma. Furthermore, the results are consistent with a no-threshold response.
PubMed ID
4016698 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.