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Analysis of the exposure-response relationship for mesothelioma among asbestos-cement factory workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225183
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991
Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
M S Huuskonen
A. Karjalainen
A. Tossavainen
J. Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amosite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupations
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Primary prevention carried out today can reduce the disease incidence in the future decades. The present disease panorama is the consequence of past asbestos exposure mainly before the 1970s. The peak incidence of asbestos-induced diseases will be reached around 2010 in Finland. The number of asbestos-related premature deaths is at present annually about 150 which exceeds the figure of fatal work accidents. Asbestos-related cancer will increase still for 15-20 years and reach its maximum, about 300 cases, in 2010, and will start to decrease after that. More than 20,000 asbestos-exposed workers have participated in the medical screening and follow-up. The termination of exposure, antismoking campaigns, improved diagnostics and careful attention to compensation issues, as well as other potentials for prevention, were the central issue of the Asbestos Program of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. An important objective of research work is to improve early diagnostics, and thereby treatment prospects, in case of asbestos-induced cancers.
PubMed ID
8684292 View in PubMed
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Asbestos hazard in the Swedish construction industry--recent trends in mesothelioma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16580
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005;31 Suppl 2:27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Göran Engholm
Anders Englund
Author Affiliation
Department of East European Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005;31 Suppl 2:27-30
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Facility Design and Construction
Female
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of pleural tumors among various categories of Swedish construction workers and to determine to what extent its change over time differs from that of the general male population. METHODS: Traditional methods have been used to study cancer incidence through 1998 in a cohort comprising 370 165 male workers examined in 1971-1992 by Bygghälsan, an organization at the time providing nationwide occupational health service. Incidence was assessed by linkage to the national cancer register. RESULTS: Swedish construction workers, particularly those heavily exposed to asbestos, had an excess incidence of pleural tumors in 1975-1998 [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 3.16, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.55-3.88]. The excess declined with subsequent follow-up periods and birth cohorts with the exception of the most recent period (SIR 3.83, 95% CI 2.64-5.38) and those borne in the 1930s. CONCLUSIONS: A possible decline in pleural tumors among men following the cessation of asbestos use 25 years earlier in the population at large may not be applicable to an end-user sector like construction work. In occupations charged with repairing and refurbishing work, there may even have been an increase lately.
PubMed ID
16363443 View in PubMed
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A Canadian experience of the pathological diagnosis of diffuse mesothelioma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246323
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):207-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
W T McCaughey
M. Al-Jabi
M. Kannerstein
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):207-10
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Registries
Abstract
A review of 398 pleural and peritoneal tumours suggests that diffuse mesothelioma was probably present in 50-60%. However, objective assessment was frequently impeded by serious deficiencies in data or material, which affect the diagnostic grading of cases seen by panels. Observer variation in diagnosis also remains a significant problem. The value of panels for diagnosis could be greatly increased by the provision of adequate data/material and by meetings.
PubMed ID
7239639 View in PubMed
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Cancer at sea: a case-control study among male Finnish seafarers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188737
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2002 Sep;59(9):613-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Heikki Saarni
J. Pentti
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FIN-20500 Turku, Finland. heikki.saarni@occuphealth.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2002 Sep;59(9):613-9
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Naval Medicine
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the possible work related reasons for the increased incidence of many cancers among seafarers.
A case-control study, nested in a cohort of all male seafarers (n = 30 940) who, according to the files of the Seamen's Pension Fund, had worked on board Finnish ships for any time during the period 1960-80. Cases of cancer of the lung, nervous system, kidney, and pancreas, leukaemia, lymphoma, and all cases histologically defined as mesotheliomas were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry in 1967-92. The preceding numbers of years at sea in various occupational categories were collected according to the type of ship (dry cargo ship, tanker, passenger vessel, icebreaker, other vessel).
The incidence for lung cancer among engine crew increased with the increase in employment time, the odds ratio (OR) after three years being 1.68 (95% CI 1.17 to 2.41). The OR of lung cancer for deck officers was 0.42 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.61). Deck personnel on icebreakers had a significantly increased risk of lung cancer > or =20 years after first employment (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.23 to 9.49). The OR for mesothelioma among engine crew with a latency of 20 years was 9.75 (95% CI 1.88 to 50.6). The OR for renal cancer among deck officers after three years employment was 2.15 (95% CI 1.14 to 4.08), but there was no increase by employment time or by latency. A rise of OR for lymphoma was detected among deck personnel on tankers, if the employment had lasted over three years (OR 2.78, 95% CI 0.98 to 7.92). The risk pattern for leukaemia was similar to that of lymphoma, the OR among deck personnel on tankers varying from 2.26 (95% CI 1.01 to 5.06) to 6.86 (95% CI 1.62 to 28.8) depending on the length of employment.
Results indicate that occupational exposures of deck crews on tankers add to their risk of renal cancer, leukaemia, and possibly lymphoma. Engine crews have an asbestos related risk of mesothelioma, and the engine room conditions also seem to increase risk of lung cancer.
Notes
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Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Mar;7(2):231-98740736
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Cites: Bioelectromagnetics. 1999 Dec;20(8):512-810559772
Cites: Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1979 Sep;74(3):267-73290375
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1988 Jun;14(3):197-2003393856
PubMed ID
12205234 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among members of the Norwegian trade union of insulation workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17975
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Gunnar Mowe
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Labor Unions
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Insulation work has been described as an occupation with high exposure to asbestos. A cohort of members of the Norwegian Trade Union of Insulation Workers (n = 1116), hired between 1930 and 1975, was established. During 2002, the cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of pleural mesothelioma was 12.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.0-24.6). Two cases with peritoneal mesotheliomas were found (SIR, 14.8; 95% CI = 1.8-53.4). The SIR of lung cancer was 3.0 (95% CI = 2.3-3.8). Four cases of lung cancer were observed among cork workers without any exposure to asbestos, but to cork dust and tar smoke (SIR, 5.3; 95% CI = 1.5-13.6). Our study showed a high risk of mesothelioma and an elevated risk of lung cancer among members of the Trade Union of Insulation Workers.
PubMed ID
14724482 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among workers in the asbestos-cement producing industry in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18673
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Dec;28(6):411-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Grete Damberg
Axel Wannag
Gunnar Mowe
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Montebello, Oslo, Norway. bente.ulvestad@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Dec;28(6):411-7
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects - classification
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Risk factors
Time
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The incidence of cancer among employees of a Norwegian asbestos-cement factory was studied in relation to duration of exposure and time since first exposure. The factory was active in 1942-1968. Most of the asbestos in use was chrysotile, but for technical reasons 8% amphiboles was added. METHODS: For the identification of cancer cases, a cohort of 541 male workers was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. The analysis was based on the comparison between the observed and expected number of cancer cases. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated. Period of first employment, duration of employment, and time since first employment were used as indicators of exposure. Poisson regression analysis was used for the internal comparisons. RESULTS: The standardized incidence ratio was 52.5 (95% CI 31.1-83.0) for pleural mesothelioma, on the basis of 18 cases. The highest standardized incidence ratio was found for workers first employed in the earliest production period (SIR 99.0, 95% CI 51.3-173). No peritoneal mesothelioma was found. The standardized incidence ratio for lung cancer was 3.1 (95% CI 2.14.3), but no dose-response effect was observed. The ratio of mesothelioma to lung cancer cases was 1:2. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed a high incidence of mesothelioma and a high ratio of mesothelioma to lung cancer among asbestos-cement workers. The high incidence of mesothelioma was probably due to the fact that a relatively high proportion of amphiboles was used in the production process.
PubMed ID
12539801 View in PubMed
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A case of occupational peritoneal mesothelioma from exposure to tremolite-free chrysotile in Quebec, Canada: A black swan case.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141454
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Feb;54(2):153-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
David Egilman
Lelia M Menéndez
Author Affiliation
Brown University, Department of Family Medicine Health, Providence, RI, USA. degilman@egilman.com
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2011 Feb;54(2):153-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos, Amphibole - toxicity
Asbestos, Serpentine - toxicity
Fatal Outcome
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
Tremolite contamination has been proposed as the cause of mesothelioma in workers exposed to commercial chrysotile. The asbestos industry and scientists it has sponsored, for example, have argued that commercial chrysotile does not cause peritoneal mesothelioma.
Case report of peritoneal mesothelioma in a mill worker from a tremolite free Canadian mine.
Reports from pathology and occupational health and safety panels conclude that this mill worker developed work-related peritoneal mesothelioma.
Chrysotile without tremolite can cause peritoneal mesothelioma.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Ind Med. 2011 Aug;54(8):64621630296
PubMed ID
20721899 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.