Skip header and navigation

Refine By

100 records – page 1 of 10.

Analysis of the exposure-response relationship for mesothelioma among asbestos-cement factory workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225183
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991
Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
M S Huuskonen
A. Karjalainen
A. Tossavainen
J. Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Med Lav. 1995 Sep-Oct;86(5):426-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amosite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupations
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Primary prevention carried out today can reduce the disease incidence in the future decades. The present disease panorama is the consequence of past asbestos exposure mainly before the 1970s. The peak incidence of asbestos-induced diseases will be reached around 2010 in Finland. The number of asbestos-related premature deaths is at present annually about 150 which exceeds the figure of fatal work accidents. Asbestos-related cancer will increase still for 15-20 years and reach its maximum, about 300 cases, in 2010, and will start to decrease after that. More than 20,000 asbestos-exposed workers have participated in the medical screening and follow-up. The termination of exposure, antismoking campaigns, improved diagnostics and careful attention to compensation issues, as well as other potentials for prevention, were the central issue of the Asbestos Program of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. An important objective of research work is to improve early diagnostics, and thereby treatment prospects, in case of asbestos-induced cancers.
PubMed ID
8684292 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asbestos exposure and survival in malignant mesothelioma: a description of 122 consecutive cases at an occupational clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120270
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;2(4):224-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
E. Skammeritz
L H Omland
J P Johansen
O. Omland
Author Affiliation
Danish Ramazzini Center, Department of Occupational Medicine, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. ellenskammeritz@gmail.com
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;2(4):224-36
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - toxicity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
The natural history and etiology of malignant mesothelioma (MM) is already thoroughly described in the literature, but there is still debate on prognostic factors, and details of asbestos exposure and possible context with clinical and demographic data, have not been investigated comprehensively.
Description of patients with MM, focusing on exposure, occupation, survival and prognostic factors.
Review of medical records of patients with MM from 1984 to 2010 from a Danish Occupational clinic. Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and prognostic factors were identified by Cox regression analysis.
110 (90.2%) patients were male, and 12 (9.8%) were female. The median (interquartile rang [IQR]) age was 65 (13) years. Pleural MM was seen in 101 (82.8%) patients, and peritoneal in 11 (9.0%); two (1.6%) had MM to tunica vaginalis testis, and eight (6.6%) to multiple serosal surfaces. We found 68 (55.7%) epithelial tumors, 26 (21.3%) biphasic, and 6 (4.9%) sarcomatoid. 12 (9.8%) patients received tri-modal therapy, 66 (54.1%) received one-/two-modality treatment, and 36 (29.5%) received palliative care. Asbestos exposure was confirmed in 107 (91.0%) patients, probable in four (3.3%), and unidentifiable in 11 (9.0%). The median (IQR) latency was 42 (12.5) years. Exposure predominantly occurred in shipyards. The median overall survival was 1.05 (95% CI: 0.96-1.39) years; 5-year survival was 5.0% (95% CI: 2.0%-13.0%). Female sex, good WHO performance status (PS), epithelial histology and tri-modal treatment were associated with a favorable prognosis.
MM continuously presents a difficult task diagnostically and therapeutically, and challenges occupational physicians with regard to identification and characterization of asbestos exposure.
PubMed ID
23022841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asbestos hazard in the Swedish construction industry--recent trends in mesothelioma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16580
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005;31 Suppl 2:27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Göran Engholm
Anders Englund
Author Affiliation
Department of East European Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005;31 Suppl 2:27-30
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Facility Design and Construction
Female
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of pleural tumors among various categories of Swedish construction workers and to determine to what extent its change over time differs from that of the general male population. METHODS: Traditional methods have been used to study cancer incidence through 1998 in a cohort comprising 370 165 male workers examined in 1971-1992 by Bygghälsan, an organization at the time providing nationwide occupational health service. Incidence was assessed by linkage to the national cancer register. RESULTS: Swedish construction workers, particularly those heavily exposed to asbestos, had an excess incidence of pleural tumors in 1975-1998 [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 3.16, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.55-3.88]. The excess declined with subsequent follow-up periods and birth cohorts with the exception of the most recent period (SIR 3.83, 95% CI 2.64-5.38) and those borne in the 1930s. CONCLUSIONS: A possible decline in pleural tumors among men following the cessation of asbestos use 25 years earlier in the population at large may not be applicable to an end-user sector like construction work. In occupations charged with repairing and refurbishing work, there may even have been an increase lately.
PubMed ID
16363443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asbestos-related cancers among 28,300 military servicemen in the Royal Norwegian Navy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98734
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Jan;53(1):64-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Leif Aage Strand
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Vilhelm F Koefoed
Jan Sommerfelt-Pettersen
Tom Kristian Grimsrud
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. leif.age.strand@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Jan;53(1):64-71
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - pathology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Naval Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This study focus on the incidence of asbestos-related cancers among 28,300 officers and enlisted servicemen in the Royal Norwegian Navy. Until 1987, asbestos aboard the vessels potentially caused exposure to 11,500 crew members. METHODS: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated for malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal, pharyngeal, stomach, and colorectal cancers according to service aboard between 1950 and 1987 and in other Navy personnel. RESULTS: Increased risk of mesothelioma was seen among engine room crews, with SIRs of 6.23 (95% CI = 2.51-12.8) and 6.49 (95% CI = 2.11-15.1) for personnel who served less than 2 years and those with longer service, respectively. Lung cancer was nearly 20% higher than expected among both engine crews and non-engine crews. An excess of colorectal cancer bordering on statistical significance was seen among non-engine crews (SIR = 1.14; 95% CI = 0.98-1.32). Land-based personnel and personnel who served aboard after 1987 had lower lung cancer incidence than expected (SIR = 0.77; 95% CI = 0.64-0.92). No elevated risk of laryngeal, pharyngeal, or stomach cancers was seen. CONCLUSION: The overall increase (65%) in mesotheliomas among military Navy servicemen was confined to marine engine crews only. The mesothelioma incidence can be taken as an indicator of the presence or absence of asbestos exposure, but it offered no consistent explanation to the variation in incidence of other asbestos-related cancers.
PubMed ID
19921706 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canada's asbestos legacy at home and abroad.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161734
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;13(2):236-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
James T Brophy
Margaret M Keith
Jenny Schieman
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers (OHCOW), Canada. jbrophy@ohcow.on.ca
Source
Int J Occup Environ Health. 2007 Apr-Jun;13(2):236-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Asbestos - economics - toxicity
Canada
Commerce
Developing Countries
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Extraction and Processing Industry - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
International Cooperation
Labor Unions
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Mesothelioma - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite international efforts to block Canada's export of asbestos, the Canadian federal government continues to defend the economic interests of the asbestos industry. Ironically, Canadian asbestos miners, mill workers, and those engaged in a wide range of other occupations continue to suffer asbestos-related disease and premature death. Although there is an employer-funded compensation system in each province, many workers with mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases remain uncompensated. The export of Canadian asbestos to developing countries sets the stage for another preventable occupational disease epidemic that will manifest over the coming decades. There is growing support from the Canadian labor movement for an end to asbestos exportation and for a just transition strategy for the asbestos workers and their communities.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Occup Environ Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;13(4):45118085060
Comment In: Int J Occup Environ Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;14(2):157-818507297
PubMed ID
17718182 View in PubMed
Less detail

A Canadian experience of the pathological diagnosis of diffuse mesothelioma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246323
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):207-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
W T McCaughey
M. Al-Jabi
M. Kannerstein
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):207-10
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Peritoneal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Registries
Abstract
A review of 398 pleural and peritoneal tumours suggests that diffuse mesothelioma was probably present in 50-60%. However, objective assessment was frequently impeded by serious deficiencies in data or material, which affect the diagnostic grading of cases seen by panels. Observer variation in diagnosis also remains a significant problem. The value of panels for diagnosis could be greatly increased by the provision of adequate data/material and by meetings.
PubMed ID
7239639 View in PubMed
Less detail

100 records – page 1 of 10.