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Allergic disease, immunoglobulins, exposure to mercury and dental amalgam in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15819
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):339-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P. Herrström
B. Högstedt
N. Holthuis
A. Schütz
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1997;69(5):339-42
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Eczema - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulins - analysis
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - blood
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High-dose exposure to inorganic mercury in man can influence the immune system and in rare cases cause immune-related disease. Some experimental animals also react with autoimmunity after low doses of inorganic mercury. Glomerulonephritis and an increased formation of immunoglobulin type E (IgE) are characteristic of these reactions. A recent study of 15-year-old adolescents demonstrated an association between immunoglobulin type A (IgA) and mercury concentration in plasma (P-Hg). There was also an association between allergic disease and IgA levels. The present study included 54 male and 23 female 19-year-old students who were recruited from a cohort that had been previously defined in a survey of allergic disease. Of the students, 39 (51%) had asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or eczema. Similar amalgam burden and P-Hg levels were observed in students with (n = 39) and without (n = 38) allergic disease (P = 0.48 and P = 0.98, respectively). As expected, IgE levels were significantly higher in the group with allergic disease (P = 0.006), but there was no association between P-Hg and IgE. The P-Hg levels were very low (median 1.50 nmol/l) and correlated significantly (r = 0.31) with the small number of amalgam surfaces (P = 0.007). Thirty-seven students had no amalgam fillings. P-Hg levels did not associate significantly with IgA, but did so with IgG2 (r = 0.33; P = 0.003). No conclusive correlation was observed between IgG2 and amalgam fillings. The findings of this study in 19-year-old subjects differ from earlier data obtained in a sample 4 years younger. The possibility of chance in the association between P-Hg levels and IgG2 must, however, be considered.
PubMed ID
9192218 View in PubMed
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Are liver and renal lesions in East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) associated with high mercury levels?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78038
Source
Environ Health. 2007;6:11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Sonne Christian
Dietz Rune
Leifsson Pall S
Asmund Gert
Born Erik W
Kirkegaard Maja
Author Affiliation
Section for Contaminants, Effects and Marine Mammals, Department of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej, Roskilde, Denmark. csh@dmu.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2007;6:11
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Food chain
Greenland
Inflammation
Kidney - chemistry - pathology
Kidney Diseases - etiology - veterinary
Liver - chemistry - pathology
Liver Diseases - etiology - veterinary
Mercury - adverse effects - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Ursidae
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the Arctic, polar bears (Ursus maritimus) bio-accumulate mercury as they prey on polluted ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). Studies have shown that polar bears from East Greenland are among the most mercury polluted species in the Arctic. It is unknown whether these levels are toxic to liver and kidney tissue. METHODS: We investigated the histopathological impact from anthropogenic long-range transported mercury on East Greenland polar bear liver (n = 59) and kidney (n = 57) tissues. RESULTS: Liver mercury levels ranged from 1.1-35.6 microg/g wet weight and renal levels ranged from 1-50 microg/g wet weight, of which 2 liver values and 9 kidney values were above known toxic threshold level of 30 microg/g wet weight in terrestrial mammals. Evaluated from age-correcting ANCOVA analyses, liver mercury levels were significantly higher in individuals with visible Ito cells (p
PubMed ID
17439647 View in PubMed
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Biomarker responses in nesting, common eiders in the Canadian arctic in relation to tissue cadmium, mercury and selenium concentrations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6027
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2003 Feb-Aug;12(1-4):225-37
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mark Wayland
Judit E G Smits
H Grant Gilchrist
Tracy Marchant
Jonathan Keating
Author Affiliation
Environment Canada, Prairie and Northern Region, Prairie and Northern Wildlife Research Centre, 115 Perimeter rd, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 0X4. mark.wayland@ec.gc.ca
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2003 Feb-Aug;12(1-4):225-37
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biological Markers - analysis
Body Burden
Cadmium - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Corticosterone - blood
Ducks
Female
Glycogen - analysis
Health status
Immune System - physiology
Liver - chemistry
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Population Dynamics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Selenium - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Vitamin A - analysis
Abstract
Populations of many North American sea ducks are declining. Biomarkers may offer valuable insights regarding the health and fitness of sea ducks in relation to contaminant burdens. In this study we examined body condition, immune function, corticosterone stress response, liver glycogen levels and vitamin A status in relation to tissue concentrations of mercury, selenium and cadmium in female common eiders during the nesting period. The study was conducted in the eastern Canadian arctic during July, 2000. Hepatic mercury, selenium and renal cadmium concentrations ranged 1.5-9.8, 6.5-47.5 and 74-389 microg/g, dry wt, respectively. Mercury concentrations were negatively related to dissection body mass, heart mass and fat mass. Cadmium concentrations were negatively related to mass at capture and dissection mass after controlling for the mercury concentration-dissection mass relationship. Cell-mediated immunity was assessed by the skin swelling reaction to an injection of phytohemagglutinin-P, and was unrelated to metal concentrations. After adjusting the corticosterone concentration to account for the time between capture and sampling, there was a negative relationship between the residual corticosterone concentration and selenium. Liver glycogen concentrations were not significantly related to metal concentrations. Mercury concentrations were positively related to those of hepatic retinol and retinyl palmitate and the ratio of the retinol to retinyl palmitate in liver. They were negatively related to the ratio of plasma to liver retinol. Our findings do not indicate that exposure to metals may have adversely affected the health of these birds. They do, however, suggest that more research is required to elucidate mechanisms by which exposure to these metals could impact body condition.
PubMed ID
12739870 View in PubMed
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Cancer occurrence among European mercury miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21128
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):591-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
P. Boffetta
M. Garcia-Gómez
V. Pompe-Kirn
D. Zaridze
T. Bellander
M. Bulbulyan
J D Caballero
F. Ceccarelli
D. Colin
T. Dizdarevic
S. Español
A. Kobal
N. Petrova
G. Sällsten
E. Merler
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Cancer Epidemiology, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. boffetta@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):591-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mercury - adverse effects
Mining
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the carcinogenicity of inorganic mercury in humans. METHODS: We studied the mortality from cancer among 6784 male and 265 female workers of four mercury mines and mills in Spain, Slovenia, Italy and the Ukraine. Workers were employed between the beginning of the century and 1990; the follow-up period lasted from the 1950s to the 1990s. We compared the mortality of the workers with national reference rates. RESULTS: Among men, there was no overall excess cancer mortality; an increase was observed in mortality from lung cancer (standardized mortality ratio [SMR] 1.19, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.38) and liver cancer (SMR 1.64, CI 1.18-2.22). The increase in lung cancer risk was restricted to workers from Slovenia and the Ukraine: no relationship was found with duration of employment or estimated mercu ry exposure. The increase in liver cancer risk was present both among miners and millers and was stronger in workers from Italy and Slovenia: there was a trend with estimated cumulative exposure but not with duration of employment, and the excess was not present in a parallel analysis of cancer incidence among workers from Slovenia. No increase was observed for other types of cancer, including brain and kidney tumours. Among female workers (Ukraine only), three deaths occurred from ovarian cancer, likely representing an excess. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to inorganic mercury in mines and mills does not seem strongly associated with cancer risk, with the possible exception of liver cancer; the increase in lung cancer may be explained by co-exposure to crystalline silica and radon.
PubMed ID
10189044 View in PubMed
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Concerns continue over mercury and autism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182197
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2004 Jan;26(1):91; reply 91-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004

Contact stomatitis to mercury associated with spontaneous mononuclear cell infiltrates in brown Norway (BN) rats with HgCl2-induced autoimmunity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57689
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 1994 Nov;23(10):441-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
G. Warfvinge
A. Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Pathology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 1994 Nov;23(10):441-5
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Topical
Animals
Autoimmune Diseases - genetics - immunology
Basement Membrane - immunology - pathology
Dendritic Cells - immunology - pathology
Epithelium - immunology - pathology
Immunization
Injections, Intradermal
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - immunology - pathology
Lichenoid Eruptions - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Lymph Nodes - immunology - pathology
Macrophages - immunology - pathology
Male
Mercuric Chloride - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Mercury - adverse effects
Mouth Mucosa - immunology - pathology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomatitis - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Abstract
Light microscopy and immunocytochemistry have been used to study the tissue reaction to non-irritant concentrations of mercury painted onto the oral mucosa of genetically mercury-sensitive BN rats. Low-dose skin injections of HgCl2 in BN rats result in an autoimmune syndrome, including also a spontaneous migration of T lymphocytes into the oral mucosa. Our results show that such infiltrates confer an increased degree of reactivity (contact stomatitis) to HgCl2 painted onto the BN (Hg) rat oral mucosa. In contrast, results were negative in the LEW rat strain, which is also resistant to development of autoimmunity to skin-injected mercury. The possible involvement of mucosal mercury-loaded macrophages is discussed. The results are also discussed with respect to possible etiologic and pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the development of dental material (amalgam)-associated lichenoid lesions of human oral mucosa.
PubMed ID
7861329 View in PubMed
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[Continuous use of mercury manometers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49235
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Mar 8;161(10):1427
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1999
Author
P E Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Frederikssund Sygehus, medicinisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Mar 8;161(10):1427
Date
Mar-8-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure Determination - instrumentation
Denmark
Environmental health
Guidelines
Humans
Manometry - instrumentation
Mercury - adverse effects
PubMed ID
10085755 View in PubMed
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Dental amalgam--environmental aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223240
Source
Adv Dent Res. 1992 Sep;6:125-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
D. Arenholt-Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Royal Dental College, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Adv Dent Res. 1992 Sep;6:125-30
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Availability
Denmark
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Dental Clinics
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Humans
Mercury - adverse effects
Mortuary Practice
Refuse Disposal
Sewage
Sweden
Abstract
Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries. Major amalgam particles from trituration surplus of those produced during the carving and burnishing of new amalgam restorations are generally collected in coarse filters and sold for refinement. Minor amalgam particles released by production of new fillings or by removal of old restorations partly sediment in tubes and drains. The remaining particles are carried with the waste water stream to the local purifying plant. In Scandinavia, the industrial discharge of mercury-contaminated waste water has been reduced to a minimum. According to recent investigations, dental clinics appear to be responsible for the major amount of mercury collected in the sludge generated in purifying plants. If threshold values for heavy metal content, including mercury, are exceeded, the sludge is not allowed to be recycled as fertilizer. Installation of an approved amalgam-separating apparatus in dental clinics is now mandatory in several countries--for example, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, and Denmark. Approval of amalgam separators is based on national testing programs, including clinical or laboratory tests demanding 95-99% separating efficiency.
PubMed ID
1292452 View in PubMed
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Dental amalgam, low-dose exposure to mercury, and urinary proteins in young Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215677
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1995 Mar-Apr;50(2):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Herrström
A. Schütz
G. Raihle
N. Holthuis
B. Högstedt
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Primary Care Center Hertig Knut Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1995 Mar-Apr;50(2):103-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Creatinine - urine
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Mercury - adverse effects - urine
Proteinuria - chemically induced - urine
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury can cause kidney injury. Evidence gained from occupational medicine indicates that individuals who are exposed to only environmental sources, including amalgam tooth fillings, are at very little risk. Animal experiments, however, have revealed glomerular lesions of immunologic origin after low-dose exposure to inorganic mercury. In this study, the association between the number of amalgam tooth surfaces, urinary mercury, and proteinuria was explored in a sample of 48 randomly selected, apparently healthy male students who were 17-22 y of age. Presence of any of the following proteins in two separate urine samples was considered to be potentially indicative of any tubular and/or glomerular lesion: albumin, alpha-1-microglobulin (HC-protein), kappa and lambda light chains, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. No significant relationship was found between any of the proteins and amalgam or urinary mercury. The results of this study did not suggest that amalgam fillings cause kidney dysfunction in humans.
PubMed ID
7786045 View in PubMed
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70 records – page 1 of 7.