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Acquiring and refining CBT skills and competencies: which training methods are perceived to be most effective?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148955
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
James Bennett-Levy
Freda McManus
Bengt E Westling
Melanie Fennell
Author Affiliation
University of Sydney and Southern Cross University, Australia. james.bennettlevy@ncahs. health.nsw.gov.au
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognitive Therapy - education
Curriculum
Education
Female
Humans
Male
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
A theoretical and empirical base for CBT training and supervision has started to emerge. Increasingly sophisticated maps of CBT therapist competencies have recently been developed, and there is evidence that CBT training and supervision can produce enhancement of CBT skills. However, the evidence base suggesting which specific training techniques are most effective for the development of CBT competencies is lacking.
This paper addresses the question: What training or supervision methods are perceived by experienced therapists to be most effective for training CBT competencies?
120 experienced CBT therapists rated which training or supervision methods in their experience had been most effective in enhancing different types of therapy-relevant knowledge or skills.
In line with the main prediction, it was found that different training methods were perceived to be differentially effective. For instance, reading, lectures/talks and modelling were perceived to be most useful for the acquisition of declarative knowledge, while enactive learning strategies (role-play, self-experiential work), together with modelling and reflective practice, were perceived to be most effective in enhancing procedural skills. Self-experiential work and reflective practice were seen as particularly helpful in improving reflective capability and interpersonal skills.
The study provides a framework for thinking about the acquisition and refinement of therapist skills that may help trainers, supervisors and clinicians target their learning objectives with the most effective training strategies.
PubMed ID
19703329 View in PubMed
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Assessing clinical practice of student nurses: Views of teachers, mentors and students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269924
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2014 Aug;34(8):1161-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Kristiina Helminen
Kerttu Tossavainen
Hannele Turunen
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2014 Aug;34(8):1161-6
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Educational Measurement
Faculty, Nursing
Finland
Humans
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Students, Nursing - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment received by students affects the way that they conduct their studies and shapes their interests in clinical placements. It is therefore important that mentors and teachers have high quality assessment strategies to ensure the competence of nursing students.
The objective of this study is to describe the views and experiences of nursing students, nursing teachers, and mentors on the final assessment of nursing students in clinical practice. The study also investigates respondents' views on using a standardized national or European scheme for clinical assessment in the future.
Descriptive survey design with a questionnaire.
Implemented in five Finnish universities of applied sciences and in five partner hospitals.
Nursing students (n=276), nursing teachers (n=108) and mentors (n=225).
A questionnaire was used to collect data. Survey data were analyzed by using SPSS version 19. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations were used to characterize the data.
Nursing students felt that they had spent enough time with their mentors during their clinical practice period to ensure that the mentors could assess their behavior. Mentors also evaluated that they had spent enough time with the students. Students and mentors both indicated occasional difficulties with the language used in the competence assessment document. Most of the nursing students and mentors shared the view that it is always necessary for a teacher to be involved in the final assessment discussion.
The study highlights the importance of assessment skills of mentors and the important role of the teachers. Findings from this study indicate that nursing students' clinical practice assessment already includes many good practices, but we still have some difficulties in ensuring effective measures of competence.
PubMed ID
24874072 View in PubMed
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Clinical coaching in forensic psychiatry: an innovative program to recruit and retain nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150619
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2009 May;47(5):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Gail Thorpe
Pamela Moorhouse
Carolyn Antonello
Author Affiliation
Schizophrenia Clinic, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. gthorpe@rohcg.on.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2009 May;47(5):43-7
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Career Choice
Curriculum
Forensic Nursing - education - manpower
Forensic Psychiatry - education - manpower
Humans
Inservice Training - methods
Mentors - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Ontario is currently experiencing a nursing shortage crisis. Recruitment and retention of nursing staff are critical issues. In response, retention strategies have been developed by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The Late Career Nurse Initiative is one such strategy. This innovative program encourages nurses age 55 and older to remain in the workforce by providing opportunities to use their nursing experience in less physically demanding alternate roles for a portion of their time. The Royal Ottawa Health Care Group has developed a clinical coach program in forensics that matches these veteran nurses with new graduates or nurses new to forensic psychiatric nursing. The program has resulted in retention rates of more than 91% after 1 year. This article provides background about the program and highlights its outcomes.
PubMed ID
19489514 View in PubMed
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Clinical mentors' experiences of their intercultural communication competence in mentoring culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students: A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307021
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2020 Apr; 87:104348
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Pia Hagqvist
Ashlee Oikarainen
Anna-Maria Tuomikoski
Jonna Juntunen
Kristina Mikkonen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Healthcare Unit, Centria University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2020 Apr; 87:104348
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Communication
Cultural Competency
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Female
Finland
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mentoring
Mentors - psychology
Multilingualism
Qualitative Research
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
Intercultural communication has become increasingly important in nursing due to the cross-border mobility of patients, health professionals and students. Development of cultural competence continues to be a challenge, particularly among professionals such as educators or healthcare providers who work in professions requiring communication across cultural boundaries. Despite challenges in nursing education related to cultural diversity, competence in intercultural communication has been proven to empower students and to help them grow professionally.
The aim of this study was to describe clinical mentors' experiences of their intercultural communication competence in mentoring culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students during completion of their clinical practice.
Qualitative study design.
The participants were 12 nurses who had previously mentored at least two culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students.
Data were collected during spring 2016 using semi-structured interviews of 12 mentors working in specialized nursing care at one hospital located in central Finland. Data were analyzed using deductive-inductive content analysis. The main concepts of the Integrated Model of Intercultural Communication Competence were used during the semi-structured theme interviews and during analysis. These concepts include empathy, motivation, global attitude, intercultural experience and interaction involvement.
Mentors stated that empathy motivates them in the development of intercultural communication. Mentors experienced a lack of resources and support from their superiors, which caused psychological and ethical strain and reduced mentors' motivation. Mentors openly admitted that they had experienced fear towards unknown cultures, but that this fear was reduced through positive mentoring experiences and cultural encounters.
Continuous education on intercultural communication competence could succeed to further develop clinical mentors' mentoring expertise, which could have the potential to greatly benefit students, patients and staff. Such education could be designed, implemented and measured for its effect in collaboration between health care organizations and higher educational institutions.
PubMed ID
32028100 View in PubMed
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Source
J Nurs Manag. 2005 Jul;13(4):312-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Barbro Ronsten
Ewa Andersson
Barbro Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Visby Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2005 Jul;13(4):312-21
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Empathy
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Trust
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mentorship is related to nurses' success in nursing practice linked to professionalism, nursing quality improvement and self-confidence. AIM: To elucidate mentorship of recently registered nurses' view of themselves with regard to their development of nursing competencies by means of the Sympathy-Acceptance-Understanding-Competence (SAUC) model for confirming mentorship. METHODS: Questionnaires, personal interviews and focus group interviews were used for evaluation 2 years after the completion of a year of mentorship, the subjects being eight nurses. FINDINGS: The study showed that novice nurses evaluated their mentors as confirming, which is understood as a key factor for novice nurses' positively reinforced self-relation (perception of themselves) and self-knowledge linked to improved competencies in nursing practice such as more secure and motivated to nurse (S-phase), increased capacity to verbalize nursing situations (A-phase) and to reflect upon and evaluate patient situations based on patients' unique identities as individuals (U-phase), and improved abilities to support patients' own resources as individuals from a more holistic view and to establish collaboration with other professionals. CONCLUSION: Mentorship enabled novice nurses to nurse in a more reflective and holistic way, and their positively reinforced self-relation may be understood as a crucial ingredient for maintaining quality standards in nursing in the future.
PubMed ID
15946170 View in PubMed
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Educating international nurses: curricular innovation through a bachelor of science in nursing bridging program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166499
Source
Nurse Educ. 2006 Nov-Dec;31(6):244-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sue Coffey
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. scoffey@yorku.ca
Source
Nurse Educ. 2006 Nov-Dec;31(6):244-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Professional, Retraining - organization & administration
Emigration and Immigration
Foreign Professional Personnel - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Licensure, Nursing
Mentors - psychology
Models, Educational
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Abstract
A curricular innovation was designed to provide internationally educated nurses with access to nursing licensure and employment. Through a program that includes professionally relevant English language support, mentorship, academic upgrading, workplace experiences, and clinical skills support, a mechanism has been created for internationally educated nurses to earn a bachelor of science in nursing degree and overcome barriers to practicing their profession.
PubMed ID
17108786 View in PubMed
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Enabling relationship formation, development, and closure in a one-year female mentoring program at a non-governmental organization: a mixed-method study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276109
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016;16:179
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Madelene Larsson
Camilla Pettersson
Therése Skoog
Charli Eriksson
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016;16:179
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mental health
Mentors - psychology
Organizations
Psychological Theory
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental health problems among young women aged 16-24 have increased significantly in recent decades, and interventions are called for. Mentoring is a well-established preventative/promotive intervention for developing adolescents, but we have yet to fully understand how the relationship between the mentor and the protégé forms, develops, and closes. In this study, we focused on a female mentoring program implemented by a Swedish non-governmental organization, The Girls Zone. First, we examined the psychological and social characteristics of the young women who chose to take part in the program as protégés. Second, we investigated adolescent female protégés' own experiences of the relationship process based on a relational-cultural theory perspective.
The mixed-method study included 52 questionnaires and five semi-structured interviews with young women aged 15-26 who had contacted The Girls Zone between 2010 and 2012 in order to find a mentor. Their experience of the mentoring relationships varied in duration. Data were analysed statistically and with inductive qualitative content analysis.
The group of protégés was heterogeneous in that some had poor mental health and some had good mental health. On the other hand, the group was homogenous in that all its members had shown pro-active self-care by actively seeking out the program due to experiences of loneliness and a need to meet and talk with a person who could listen to them. The relationships were initially characterized by feelings of nervousness and ambivalence. However, after some time, these developed into authentic, undemanding, non-hierarchical relationships on the protégés' terms. The closure of relationships aroused feelings of both abandonment and developing strength.
Mentorships that are in line with perspectives of the relational-cultural theory meet the relationship needs expressed by the female protégés. Mentor training should focus on promoting skills such as active listening and respect for the protégé based on an engaged, empathic, and authentic approach in a non-hierarchical relationship. These insights have the potential to inform interventions in several arenas where young women create authentic relationships with older persons, such as in school, in traditional health care contexts, and in youth recreation centres.
Notes
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Cites: J Adolesc. 2009 Feb;32(1):1-1718258296
Cites: J Prim Prev. 2009 Mar;30(2):109-3019283481
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PubMed ID
26905222 View in PubMed
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Establishing roles in genetic nursing: interviews with Canadian nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170230
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):96-115
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Mary McCullum
Lynda G Balneaves
Mary Jane Esplen
June Carroll
Mary Kelly
Stephanie Kieffer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):96-115
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Certification
Employment - organization & administration
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis - therapy
Genetics, Medical - education - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Job Description
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Social Support
Societies, Nursing
Specialties, Nursing - education - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe nurses' roles in providing clinical genetic services related to adult onset hereditary disease and factors that influence genetic nursing practice in Canada. The study involved semi-structured telephone interviews with 22 nurses from 5 Canadian provinces with full-time or part-time roles in providing genetic services. The interviews included open-ended questions to elicit descriptions of genetic nursing roles and factors that support and limit opportunities in genetic nursing practice. Thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews revealed that, in addition to genetic counselling, the nurses reported a wide range of roles and responsibilities related to the provision of genetic services that drew directly on their nursing background (e.g., patient assessment, health promotion). Factors identified as supporting genetic nursing roles included nursing background, being part of a multidisciplinary team, and receiving mentorship. Challenges in establishing roles in genetic nursing were related to role ambiguity, lack of recognition of nursing expertise, limited availability of genetics education, isolation, and instability of nursing positions. Recommendations to support the development and expansion of genetic nursing practice were identified. A coordinated national effort among all stakeholders is needed to provide the resources necessary to support the appropriate and effective use of nursing expertise as genetics is integrated into the Canadian health-care system.
PubMed ID
16541821 View in PubMed
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Factors related to the nursing student-patient relationship: the students' perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160833
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2008 Jul;28(5):539-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Arja Suikkala
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Jouko Katajisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. arja.suikkala@mbnet.fi
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2008 Jul;28(5):539-49
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Authoritarianism
Chi-Square Distribution
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Empathy
Female
Finland
Helping Behavior
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Mentors - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' perceptions of factors related to three types of student-patient relationship identified in an earlier study: mechanistic, authoritative and facilitative. Another aim was to identify which factors predict the type of relationship. A convenience sample of 310 Bachelor of Health Care students was recruited. The data were collected by using a questionnaire especially designed for this study. Data analysis used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, one-way analysis of variance and multinomial logistic regression. Older age was the only significant predictor of a facilitative relationship, whereas fourth-year studies and support received from a person other than supervisor predicted an authoritative relationship. Furthermore, students in authoritative and facilitative relationships had a more positive perception of the patient's attributes as a patient and of patient's improved health and commitment to self-care than students in a mechanistic relationship. A positive perception of the atmosphere during collaboration was more common among students in an authoritative relationship than in a mechanistic relationship. The findings of this study offer useful clues for developing nursing education and empowering patients with a view to improving the quality of nursing care.
PubMed ID
17935835 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.