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Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Acquiring and refining CBT skills and competencies: which training methods are perceived to be most effective?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148955
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
James Bennett-Levy
Freda McManus
Bengt E Westling
Melanie Fennell
Author Affiliation
University of Sydney and Southern Cross University, Australia. james.bennettlevy@ncahs. health.nsw.gov.au
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2009 Oct;37(5):571-83
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognitive Therapy - education
Curriculum
Education
Female
Humans
Male
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
A theoretical and empirical base for CBT training and supervision has started to emerge. Increasingly sophisticated maps of CBT therapist competencies have recently been developed, and there is evidence that CBT training and supervision can produce enhancement of CBT skills. However, the evidence base suggesting which specific training techniques are most effective for the development of CBT competencies is lacking.
This paper addresses the question: What training or supervision methods are perceived by experienced therapists to be most effective for training CBT competencies?
120 experienced CBT therapists rated which training or supervision methods in their experience had been most effective in enhancing different types of therapy-relevant knowledge or skills.
In line with the main prediction, it was found that different training methods were perceived to be differentially effective. For instance, reading, lectures/talks and modelling were perceived to be most useful for the acquisition of declarative knowledge, while enactive learning strategies (role-play, self-experiential work), together with modelling and reflective practice, were perceived to be most effective in enhancing procedural skills. Self-experiential work and reflective practice were seen as particularly helpful in improving reflective capability and interpersonal skills.
The study provides a framework for thinking about the acquisition and refinement of therapist skills that may help trainers, supervisors and clinicians target their learning objectives with the most effective training strategies.
PubMed ID
19703329 View in PubMed
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Adolescent mothers: A challenge for First Nations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4446
Source
Pages 274-279 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
that it is possible that adolescents could find support through the estab- lishn1ent of n1entoring programn1es. .Mentoring L)efinition: 1 . 1\ \Vise and trusted counsellor or teacher. 2. I'vfentor in Greek },.1fythology vvas Odysseus's tn1sted counsellor, in \Vhose guise ~Athena be- ca1ne the
  1 document  
Author
Montgomery-Andersen, R
Author Affiliation
Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 274-279 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
First Nations
Greenland
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mentors
Middle Aged
Mothers
Parenting
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Adolescent pregnancy is a growing Public Health problem in Greenland, resulting in higher risk of mortality of mothers and their children. Since social and cultural aspects are associated with adolescent pregnancy, a closer look was taken at the situation of adolescent mothers in Greenland and in Native American communities. METHODS AND RESULTS: Adolescent pregnancies and birth rates were followed in Greenland and in the First Nation communities in Alaska. Adolescent pregnancies decreased during the 1990s in both communities, but increased in 2000, bringing up the birth rate to 79 and 92 babies per 1,000 girls aged 15-19 yrs in Greenland in the U.S., respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A mentoring program to delay adolescent pregnancy and parenting, shown to be effective in African American and Latino communities, could be also used in the Greenlandic setting.
PubMed ID
15736667 View in PubMed
Documents
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The adolescent parenting program: improving outcomes through mentorship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201680
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Jun;16(3):182-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
L. Flynn
Author Affiliation
Essex Valley Visiting Nurse Association, East Orange, New Jersey 07018, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Jun;16(3):182-9
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Community Health Nursing
Female
Humans
Mentors
New Jersey
Parenting - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Adolescent parents and their infants are a population at risk. Infant mortality, low-birthweight, and child maltreatment are inordinately higher within this population than within slightly older cohorts. The purpose of this one group pretest-posttest intervention study was to analyze the efficacy of a program designed to improve infant outcomes through the enhancement of health practices and parenting skills in a sample of 137 low-income, pregnant and parenting adolescents who reside in an urban area and who screened positive for risk of child maltreatment. Based on theories of mentorship and social support, the program provided intensive home visitation by nursing paraprofessionals, indigenous to the community, for the 2 year study period. Program outcomes were compared to local and national data. Findings revealed only 4.6% of program infants were low-birthweight compared to local and national percentages of 13.5% and 9.42%. The mean length of gestation was 39.27 weeks (SD = 1.55). The incidence of infant mortality was zero, comparing favorably with national data as well as the local infant mortality rate (almost twice the state average). There were only four cases of child neglect, representing only 2.91% of the sample. This finding also compares favorably with national data.
PubMed ID
10388335 View in PubMed
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Advancing nursing leadership in long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143603
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jennifer O'Brien
Margaret Ringland
Susan Wilson
Author Affiliation
Human Resources and Support Services, St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph. jobrien@sjhcg.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:75-89
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics, Nursing
Focus Groups
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Leadership
Long-Term Care
Mentors
Nurse Administrators
Nurses
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Research
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Turnover
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Abstract
Nurses working in the long-term care (LTC) sector face unique workplace stresses, demands and circumstances. Designing approaches to leadership training and other supportive human-resource strategies that reflect the demands of the LTC setting fosters a positive work life for nurses by providing them with the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the care team and to address resident and family issues. Through the St. Joseph's Health Centre Guelph demonstration site project, funded by the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Excelling as a Nurse Leader in Long Term Care training program and the Mentor Team program were developed to address these needs. Evaluation results show that not only have individual nurses benefitted from taking part in these programs, but also that the positive effects were felt in other parts of the LTC home (as reported by Directors of Care). By creating a generally healthier work environment, it is anticipated that these programs will also have a positive effect on recruitment and retention.
PubMed ID
20463447 View in PubMed
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Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126341
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Arlene Weidner
Carol Graham
Jennifer Smith
Julia Aitken
Jill Odell
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Calgary, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Burnout, Professional - nursing - prevention & control
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Retirement
Retrospective Studies
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workplace
Abstract
Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care. However, no formal implementation plan had been developed or made available to assist employers with implementation of the programs. The findings highlight the need for more discipline in communicating, implementing and evaluating initiatives such as those evaluated retrospectively in this project. In particular, key performance indicators, baseline data, monitoring mechanisms and an evaluation plan need to be developed prior to implementation.
PubMed ID
22398489 View in PubMed
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American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) survey of radiation biology educators in U.S. and Canadian radiation oncology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148696
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Nov 1;75(3):896-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2009
Author
Barry S Rosenstein
Kathryn D Held
Sara Rockwell
Jacqueline P Williams
Elaine M Zeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA. barry.rosenstein@mssm.edu
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Nov 1;75(3):896-905
Date
Nov-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Age Factors
Aging
Biophysics - education - manpower
Canada
Educational Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Forecasting
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Mentors
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Radiation Oncology - education - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Radiobiology - education - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Research - statistics & numerical data
Societies, Medical - standards
Teaching - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Teaching Materials - supply & distribution
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada.
In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada.
The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs.
A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.
Notes
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;24(5):847-91447014
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1996 Jul 1;35(4):821-68690652
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Aug 1;45(1):153-6110477019
Cites: Radiat Res. 2007 Aug;168(2):262-517722362
Cites: Radiat Res. 2003 Dec;160(6):729-3714640790
Cites: Acad Radiol. 2000 Mar;7(3):176-8310730813
Cites: Radiat Res. 2002 May;157(5):599-60611966327
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002 Nov 1;54(3):861-7212377340
Cites: J Am Coll Radiol. 2008 Oct;5(10):1077-918812152
PubMed ID
19733012 View in PubMed
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An exploration of faculty perspectives on the in-training evaluation of residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142493
Source
Acad Med. 2010 Jul;85(7):1157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Christopher J Watling
Cynthia F Kenyon
Valerie Schulz
Mark A Goldszmidt
Elaine Zibrowski
Lorelei Lingard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. chris.watling@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2010 Jul;85(7):1157-62
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - standards
Educational Measurement - standards
Faculty, Medical
Female
General Surgery - standards
Humans
Internal Medicine - standards
Internship and Residency
Male
Mentors
Ontario
Pediatrics - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
The in-training evaluation report (ITER) is the most widely used approach to the evaluation of residents' clinical performance. Participants' attitudes toward the process may influence how they approach the task of resident evaluation. Whereas residents find ITERs most valuable when they perceive their supervisors to be engaged in the process, faculty attitudes have not yet been explored. The authors studied faculty supervisors' experiences and perceptions of the ITER process to gain insight into the factors that influence faculty engagement.
Using a grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were completed in 2008 with a purposive sample of 17 faculty involved in resident evaluation at one Canadian medical school. Constant comparative analysis for emergent themes was conducted.
Three major themes emerged: (1) Faculty engagement was apparent, with a widely held view that ITERs were a worthwhile endeavor. (2) Fragmentation of the evaluation system compromised evaluators' ability to produce meaningful ITERs. Fragmentation appeared to be a system problem, elements of which included time constraints, inconsistency in approach to ITE, and lack of continuity between educational assignments. (3) Faculty found the challenge of giving negative feedback daunting and struggled to avoid harming residents.
Faculty engagement in the ITER process may be compromised by both system and interpersonal challenges. These challenges may render ITERs less meaningful than faculty intend. Training programs must complement ITE with other tools to achieve robust systems of evaluation.
PubMed ID
20592512 View in PubMed
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Applying TQM to community health improvement: nine works in progress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214945
Source
Qual Lett Healthc Lead. 1995 Jul-Aug;7(6):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Knapp
D. Hotopp
Author Affiliation
Institute for Healthcare Improvement, USA.
Source
Qual Lett Healthc Lead. 1995 Jul-Aug;7(6):23-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Canada
Community Health Planning - organization & administration - standards
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Mentors
Organizational Objectives
Pilot Projects
Total Quality Management - standards
United States
Urban health
Abstract
Traditionally, quality improvement principles have been used in business and healthcare settings. Nine North American cities, however, have demonstrated how these same QI principles can be applied to improving community health. Guided by a conceptual framework based on a three-question model and employing a Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle, the communities were able to develop interventions that are bringing about change in targeted populations, ranging from reducing the number of suspensions from school due to violence among youths to improving post-neonatal mortality rates.
Notes
Erratum In: Qual Lett Healthc Lead 1995 Sep;7(7):15
PubMed ID
10144756 View in PubMed
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265 records – page 1 of 27.