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204 records – page 1 of 21.

A 24-Year Follow-up Study on Recidivism in Male Mentally Disordered Sexual Offenders With and Without Psychotic Disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311282
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2020 Sep; 65(5):1610-1618
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
Christian Baudin
Thomas Nilsson
Märta Wallinius
Joakim Sturup
Peter Andiné
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2020 Sep; 65(5):1610-1618
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Criminals
Follow-Up Studies
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Mentally Ill Persons - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Recidivism - statistics & numerical data
Sex Offenses
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of knowledge on mentally disordered sex offenders (MDSOs) targeting adult victims, especially regarding recidivism patterns and the specific subgroup with psychiatric disorders. This paper presents index offense data, clinical data, and recidivism patterns over up to 24 years in a cohort of 146 MDSOs, with and without psychotic disorders, sentenced in Sweden between 1993 and 1997. At the time of the offense, all offenders were affected by clinical, developmental, and criminal history factors. MDSOs with psychotic disorders only marginally differed from those without, the former being less likely to have been institutionalized during childhood, intoxicated during the index offense, or diagnosed with a personality disorder, substance use disorder, or paraphilic disorder. In the cohort, 3.4% of the MDSOs were reconvicted for a new sex offense over 2 years, 9.6% over 5 years, 13.0% over 10 years, and 17.1% over the entire follow-up period of 24 years. In MDSOs with psychotic disorders, no subjects were reconvicted during the first 2 years, while 2.6% were reconvicted over 5 years, 5.3% over 10 years, and 7.9% over 24 years. Recidivism rates for violent and general reoffenses were 39.0% and 37.7%, respectively, for the cohort of MDSOs, and subjects with psychotic disorders reoffended significantly later in general offenses. In conclusion, MDSOs with psychotic disorders showed the same recidivism pattern as MDSOs without psychotic disorders. Furthermore, recidivism research may preferably focus on follow-up periods of 5-10 years since most offenders appear to recidivate within this timeframe.
PubMed ID
32311773 View in PubMed
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[A union basis of values stigmatize the mentally ill--there is a need for ethical analysis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183328
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Sep 15;165(38):3639-41; author reply 3641
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2003

Barriers in implementation of evidence-based practice: Supported employment in Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132127
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2011;25(3):332-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Henna Hasson
Mats Andersson
Ulrika Bejerholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Business Administration, Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden. henna.hasson@fek.lu.se
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2011;25(3):332-45
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Employment, Supported - standards - trends
Evidence-Based Practice - organization & administration - standards
Health Plan Implementation - standards - utilization
Humans
Mentally Ill Persons
Models, organizational
Rehabilitation, Vocational - standards - utilization
Social Security - standards
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to identify initial barriers influencing implementation of supported employment (SE). SE, according to the individual placement and support (IPS) approach, has been recognised as an evidence-based method to help people with severe mental illness to find regular employment.
A systematic implementation evaluation of the first randomised controlled SE (IPS) trial in Sweden was conducted in August 2008 and August 2009. Data were collected on a regular basis from SE employment specialists, process heads, clients and representatives from mental health care units and vocational services (social insurance and public employment offices) using interviews, non-participant observations and document analysis.
SE employment specialists reported that existing regulations for social insurance and employment regulations presented major obstacles to implementation. Difficulties were reported in cooperation with handling officers at the vocational services. Scepticism towards persons with mental illness was common and employers expected to receive subsidies if they hired a person with mental illness. SE participants expressed fear of losing their social benefits.
The results illuminate a collision between an innovative evidence-based practice and the existing systems for social benefits and work rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
21845986 View in PubMed
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Being a psychiatric patient in the community--reclassified as the stigmatized "other".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192014
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J. Thesen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. Janecke.Thesen@isf.uib.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):248-55
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - education
Community Mental Health Services - manpower - standards
Deinstitutionalization
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Loneliness
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Norway
Prejudice
Professional-Patient Relations
Rural Population
Self Concept
Social Isolation
Stereotyping
Abstract
To explore the experiences of psychiatric patients living in six rural communities in Norway from a primary care perspective.
A "Knowledge workshop" (KW) was designed. It was a special kind of meeting between users of services for people with mental illness and service providers. The process and outcome were documented on flipcharts and audiotape and analysed by a qualitative method.
A main statement was constructed in order to capture the essence of meaning in the 10 main themes identified in the analysis. The statement is mainly about the process and state of being reclassified as a stigmatized "other", with serious consequences for both self-esteem and public esteem. The consequences include isolation and loneliness, low self-esteem, no paid work, lack of money, discrimination, and harassment. Other consequences include altered behaviour from others, lack of necessary conditions for empowerment, and the danger of becoming visible as mentally ill. Attitudinal change is called for.
Although the stigma of mental illness is a wellknown and much discussed fact, it has so far not really been included in the professional knowledge base. It is still practically absent from discussions of quality of care. In order for services to be relevant to people who need them, professionals can no longer ignore issues that are of major importance for users. Stigma must thus be included in the conceptual thinking about serving people with mental illness. The inclusion of stigma as an issue for quality of care could be a fruitful way forward.
PubMed ID
11775780 View in PubMed
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Benevolence, a central moral concept derived from a grounded theory study of nursing decision making in psychiatric settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73316
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jul;18(7):1106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
K. Lützén
C. Nordin
Author Affiliation
Stockholm School of Health and Caring Sciences, Department of Nursing, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jul;18(7):1106-11
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Beneficence
Conflict (Psychology)
Decision Making
Ethical Theory
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Helping Behavior
Humans
Intention
Male
Mentally Ill Persons
Moral Development
Morals
Motivation
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Risk-Taking
Sweden
Virtues
Abstract
Fourteen experienced nurses participated in an explorative study aimed at describing the experiential aspects of moral decision making in psychiatric nursing practice. In-depth interviews were conducted according to the grounded theory method. These were transcribed, coded and categorized in order to generate conceptual categories. The concept of benevolence was identified as a central motivating factor in the nurses' own accounts of situations in which decisions were made on behalf of the patient. This seems to conceptualize the nurses' expressed aim to do that which is 'good' for the patient in responding to his or her vulnerability. This study indicates the need for further research into the subjective, experiential aspect of ethical decision making from a contextual perspective.
PubMed ID
8370901 View in PubMed
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Between authoritarian and dialogical approaches: Attitudes and opinions on coercion among professionals in mental health and addiction care in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299025
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2018 Mar - Apr; 57:106-112
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Olaf Gjerløw Aasland
Tonje Lossius Husum
Reidun Førde
Reidar Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Study of the Medical Profession Oslo, Norway; Center for Medical Ethics Department of Health and Society University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: olaf2306@gmail.com.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2018 Mar - Apr; 57:106-112
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coercion
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Mentally Ill Persons - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Patient Care - ethics
Patient Isolation
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Patient Relations
Abstract
More knowledge is needed on how to reduce the prevalence of formal and informal coercion in Norwegian mental health care. To explore possible reasons for the widespread differences in coercive practice in psychiatry and drug addiction treatment in Norway, and the poor compliance to change initiatives, we performed a nationwide survey. Six vignettes from concrete and realistic clinical situations where coercive measures were among the alternative courses of action, and where the difference between authoritarian (paternalistic) and dialogical (user participation) practices was explicitly delineated, were presented in an electronic questionnaire distributed to five groups of professionals: psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, other professionals and auxiliary treatment staff. Non-coercive dialogical resolutions were more likely than coercive authoritative. However, there is a clear professional hierarchy with regard to authoritarian approaches, with the psychiatrists on top, followed by nurses and other professionals, and with psychologists as the least authoritarian. The majority of the respondents sometimes prefer actions that are illegal, which suggests that individual opinions about coercion often overrule legislation. The variation between and within professional groups in attitudes and opinions on coercion is extensive, and may account for some of the hitherto meagre results of two ministerial action plans for coercion reduction.
PubMed ID
29548497 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Between the legal system and medical and psychosocial intervention: the reality of family members of individuals with mental illness].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144524
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):31-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hélène Fradet
Author Affiliation
FFAPAMM, Canada.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):31-8
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Family
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental health services
Mentally Ill Persons
Quebec
Abstract
In this article, the author examines the impact of judicial intervention of individuals with mental illness on family members. The author subunits the hypothesis that an offer of more diversified services could reduce legal intervention of these individuals and consequently attenuate the devastating effects on family members. According to the families' equation, the more services will be developed and adapted, the less frequent family will have to call upon the legal system to intervene and fewer individuals with mental illness will find themselves behind bars.
PubMed ID
20361107 View in PubMed
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204 records – page 1 of 21.