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696 records – page 1 of 70.

A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
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10 year survey of pretrial examinations in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246688
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
R. Kunjukrishnan
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Crime
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The results of a survey of pretrial examination cases admitted to the provincial psychiatric hospital in Saskatchewan from 1966 to 1975 are reported. The demographic and psychiatric data and data from the psychiatric reports to the Court are analyzed. Some deficiencies noted in the reports to the Court are discussed and some remedial measures are suggested.
PubMed ID
519634 View in PubMed
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A 24-Year Follow-up Study on Recidivism in Male Mentally Disordered Sexual Offenders With and Without Psychotic Disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311282
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2020 Sep; 65(5):1610-1618
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
Christian Baudin
Thomas Nilsson
Märta Wallinius
Joakim Sturup
Peter Andiné
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2020 Sep; 65(5):1610-1618
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Criminals
Follow-Up Studies
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Mentally Ill Persons - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Recidivism - statistics & numerical data
Sex Offenses
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of knowledge on mentally disordered sex offenders (MDSOs) targeting adult victims, especially regarding recidivism patterns and the specific subgroup with psychiatric disorders. This paper presents index offense data, clinical data, and recidivism patterns over up to 24 years in a cohort of 146 MDSOs, with and without psychotic disorders, sentenced in Sweden between 1993 and 1997. At the time of the offense, all offenders were affected by clinical, developmental, and criminal history factors. MDSOs with psychotic disorders only marginally differed from those without, the former being less likely to have been institutionalized during childhood, intoxicated during the index offense, or diagnosed with a personality disorder, substance use disorder, or paraphilic disorder. In the cohort, 3.4% of the MDSOs were reconvicted for a new sex offense over 2 years, 9.6% over 5 years, 13.0% over 10 years, and 17.1% over the entire follow-up period of 24 years. In MDSOs with psychotic disorders, no subjects were reconvicted during the first 2 years, while 2.6% were reconvicted over 5 years, 5.3% over 10 years, and 7.9% over 24 years. Recidivism rates for violent and general reoffenses were 39.0% and 37.7%, respectively, for the cohort of MDSOs, and subjects with psychotic disorders reoffended significantly later in general offenses. In conclusion, MDSOs with psychotic disorders showed the same recidivism pattern as MDSOs without psychotic disorders. Furthermore, recidivism research may preferably focus on follow-up periods of 5-10 years since most offenders appear to recidivate within this timeframe.
PubMed ID
32311773 View in PubMed
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1933-2003: lessons from 70 years of experience with mental health, capacity and consent legislation in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179705
Source
Health Law Can. 2004 Apr;24(3):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004

2006 behavioral health prevalence estimates in Alaska: Serious behavioral health disorders by household

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101177
Source
State of Alaska. Department of Health and Social Services.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jan-15-2008
Author
WICHE Mental Health Program
Source
State of Alaska. Department of Health and Social Services.
Date
Jan-15-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Age group
Alaska household demographics
Co-occurring disorders
Indicators
Populations
Prevalence estimates
Serious emotional disturbance (SED)
Serious mental illness (SMI)
Substance Use Disorders (SUD)
Abstract
This report is the first phase of a larger project to generate indicators of disparities in care and unmet need in Alaska. It provides prevalence estimates of serious behavioral health disorders. Prevalence estimates provide a standardized basis for defining the need for services in a population. The second phase of this larger project assesses the number of individuals who actually receive services. The third phase combines the information to generate indicators of unmet need and disparities in care. The project is an initiative of the Division of Behavioral Health (the Division) of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. The Division contracted with the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mental Health Program to facilitate the project. Phase I prevalence estimates were generated by an epidemiologist who has developed a technology specifically for this purpose. The synthetic estimation technology has been used for mental disorders by ten western states; Alaska is the first to use the substance use estimates.
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Accountability and psychiatric disorders: how do forensic psychiatric professionals think?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148112
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pontus Höglund
Sten Levander
Henrik Anckarsäter
Susanna Radovic
Author Affiliation
Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Science, Malmo, Lund University, Sweden. pontus.hoglund@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Character
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Comorbidity
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology
Educational Status
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Insanity Defense
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Swedish penal law does not exculpate on the grounds of diminished accountability; persons judged to suffer from severe mental disorder are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care instead of prison. Re-introduction of accountability as a condition for legal responsibility has been advocated, not least by forensic psychiatric professionals. To investigate how professionals in forensic psychiatry would assess degree of accountability based on psychiatric diagnoses and case vignettes, 30 psychiatrists, 30 psychologists, 45 nurses, and 45 ward attendants from five forensic psychiatric clinics were interviewed. They were asked (i) to judge to which degree (on a dimensional scale from 1 to 5) each of 12 psychiatric diagnoses might affect accountability, (ii) to assess accountability from five case vignettes, and (iii) to list further factors they regarded as relevant for their assessment of accountability. All informants accepted to provide a dimensional assessment of accountability on this basis and consistently found most types of mental disorders to reduce accountability, especially psychotic disorders and dementia. Other factors thought to be relevant were substance abuse, social network, personality traits, social stress, and level of education.
PubMed ID
19811835 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulated coercion and short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142568
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Lars Kjellin
Tuula Wallsten
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Psychiatric Research Centre, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lars.kjellin@orebroll.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - statistics & numerical data
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The knowledge of the impact of coercion on psychiatric treatment outcome is limited. Multiple measures of coercion have been recommended. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of accumulated coercive incidents on short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care
233 involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed within five days of admission and at discharge or after maximum three weeks of care. Coercion was measured as number of coercive incidents, i.e. subjectively reported and in the medical files recorded coercive incidents, including legal status and perceived coercion at admission, and recorded and reported coercive measures during treatment. Outcome was measured both as subjective improvement of mental health and as improvement in professionally assessed functioning according to GAF. Logistic regression analyses were performed with patient characteristics and coercive incidents as independent and the two outcome measures as dependent variables
Number of coercive incidents did not predict subjective or assessed improvement. Patients having other diagnoses than psychoses or mood disorders were less likely to be subjectively improved, while a low GAF at admission predicted an improvement in GAF scores
The results indicate that subjectively and professionally assessed mental health short-term outcome of acute psychiatric hospitalisation are not predicted by the amount of subjectively and recorded coercive incidents. Further studies are needed to examine the short- and long-term effects of coercive interventions in psychiatric care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20584301 View in PubMed
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[A comment to the article by Torbjorn Tannsjo on "severe mental retardation": A necessary even when not sufficient contribution to the debate].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197872
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jun 14;97(24):2994
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2000
Author
C. Nordin
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping. CoNo@Psy.Liu.SE
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jun 14;97(24):2994
Date
Jun-14-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Concept Formation
Humans
Intellectual Disability - classification - diagnosis
Mentally Disabled Persons
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
PubMed ID
10900884 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A consensus conference in forensic psychiatry is needed to coordinate survey and care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225664
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1991
Author
M. Elton
Author Affiliation
Rättspsykiatriska regionvårdsenheten, Birgittas sjukhus, Vadstena.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Date
Sep-25-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Forensic Psychiatry - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Sweden
Violence
PubMed ID
1921615 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A criminal psychiatric study. Review of records on 103 people sentenced to hospitalization or treatment 1970-78].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242018
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Apr 18;145(16):1241-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-1983

696 records – page 1 of 70.