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Acting on audit & feedback: a qualitative instrumental case study in mental health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295007
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-31-2018
Author
Monica Stolt Pedersen
Anne Landheim
Merete Møller
Lars Lien
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Concurrent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders, Innlandet Hospital Trust, P.B. 104, 2340, Brumunddal, Norway. monica.stolt.pedersen@sykehuset-innlandet.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Date
01-31-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Benchmarking
Evidence-Based Practice
Feedback
Health Personnel
Humans
Medical Audit
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement
Abstract
The National Guideline for Assessment, Treatment and Social Rehabilitation of Persons with Concurrent Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders, launched in 2012, is to be implemented in mental health services in Norway. Audit and feedback (A&F) is commonly used as the starting point of an implementation process. It aims to measure the research-practice gap, but its effect varies greatly. Less is known of how audit and feedback is used in natural settings. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate what is discussed and thematised when Quality Improvement (QI) teams in a District Psychiatric Centre (DPC) work to complete an action form as part of an A&F cycle in 2014.
This was an instrumental multiple case study involving four units in a DPC in Norway. We used open non-participant observation of QI team meetings in their natural setting, a total of seven teams and eleven meetings.
The discussions provided health professionals with insight into their own and their colleagues' practices. They revealed insufficient knowledge of substance-related disorders and experienced unclear role expectations. We found differences in how professional groups sought answers to questions of clinical practice and that they were concerned about whether new tasks fitted in with their routine ways of working.
Acting on A&F provided an opportunity to discuss practice in general, enhancing awareness of good practice. There was a general need for arenas to relate to practice and QI team meetings after A&F may well be a suitable arena for this. Self-assessment audits seem valuable, particular in areas where no benchmarked data exists, and there is a demand for implementation of new guidelines that might change routines and develop new roles. QI teams could benefit from having a unit leader present at meetings. Nurses and social educators and others turn to psychiatrists or psychologists for answers to clinical and organisational questions beyond guidelines, and show less confidence or routine in seeking research-based information. There is a general need to emphasise training in evidence-based practice and information seeking behaviour for all professional groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29386020 View in PubMed
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[A good new future!. Interview by Bjørn Arild Ostby].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228846
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Jun 26;78(11):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-1990

[Assessment of outpatient psychiatry integrated with primary health care: the quality requirements in psychiatric services provided by family practice are accomplished in Gagnef].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209265
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Feb 19;94(8):588-90, 595
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1997

Attitudes towards health among patients and staff in mental health services: a comparison of ratings of importance of different items of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99019
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;45(2):225-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. henrika.jormfeldt@lthalland.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;45(2):225-31
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In mental health services, the concept of health is often perceived, from a biomedical perspective, as the absence of disease, involving several negative consequences together with a lack of systematic health-promoting activities. The subjective experiences of health among patients in mental health services are crucial to reinforce the experience of health throughout different phases of life. Positive dimensions of health include interaction between the individual and the environment, subjective experience of individual power as well as possibilities to influence important aspects of the life situation. The aim of the study was to describe and compare attitudes to health among patients and staff in mental health services in terms of the importance of health as measured by the attitude version of the Health Questionnaire. METHODS: A cross-sectional study including a randomly selected sample of 141 outpatients in contact with the mental health services and 140 mental health staff was performed. RESULTS: Patients and staff share most attitudes towards health, which indicates that health is a concept that applies to human beings irrespective of mental disease in the context of mental health services. CONCLUSIONS: The possibility to be able to define, measure, and compare positive dimensions of health may be important in the attempts to divert the focus towards one that promotes health and resources in mental health services and away from one on illness and deficits.
PubMed ID
19396575 View in PubMed
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The Barents project in psychiatry: a systematic comparative mental health services study between Northern Norway and Archangelsk County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166140
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;42(2):131-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Grigory Rezvyy
Terje Oiesvold
Alexander Parniakov
Oleg Ponomarev
Olga Lazurko
Reidun Olstad
Author Affiliation
Nordland Hospital, Kløveråsveien 1, 8002, Bodø, Norway. grigory.rezvy@nlsh.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;42(2):131-9
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Deinstitutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
There is virtually no readily accessible systematically recorded evidence on how the organization of mental health services in Europe's largest country, Russia, may differ from other national systems. This study systematically compares the mental health services in Archangelsk County and Northern Norway using instruments developed for trans-cultural use.
The European Service Mapping Schedule (ESMS) and The International Classification of Mental Health Care (ICMHC) were used to describe: (i) resources, organisation and utilisation of the services; (ii) their decentralisation and differentiation; (iii) some interventions delivered by the mental health service units (n = 132) in both regions.
The Norwegian services are more decentralised and differentiated, while the Russian services are largely hospital-based. The GPs are of considerable importance to the Norwegian services, functioning as gatekeepers-both centrally and peripherally. In contrast, the GP model is still poorly established in Archangelsk County. There are more units for long term stay in the Russian services than in Norway. General health care and taking over daily living activities are more organised in Archangelsk County, while psychopharmacological treatment and psychosocial interventions are more developed in Norway.
The study has revealed several differences in resources, organisation and utilisation of the mental health services between the two compared areas. The very large variations indicate that underlying local patterns of service delivering must be further investigated and taken into account in the planning of the services development.
PubMed ID
17160593 View in PubMed
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Benzodiazepine prescription for patients in opioid maintenance treatment in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163787
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007 Oct 8;90(2-3):203-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-2007
Author
Jørgen G Bramness
Hege Kornør
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. jorgen.bramness@fhi.no
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007 Oct 8;90(2-3):203-9
Date
Oct-8-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Methadone - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Narcotics - therapeutic use
Norway - epidemiology
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Physician's Practice Patterns
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Abstract
Opioid maintained patients report high levels of anxiety, but the use of benzodiazepines among these patients has been associated with negative outcomes such as increased risk of overdose and death and poorer retention in programmes. Previous research has used interview or urine analysis to assess benzodiazepine use. In this study a prescription database was applied.
The Norwegian Prescription Database covers all prescriptions for the entire population from 1 January 2004. Benzodiazepine prescriptions to patients receiving methadone (N=1364) or buprenorphine (N=805) in 2004 and 2005 were studied. Type and amount of drugs received were investigated.
Overall 40% of the patients received at least one prescription for a benzodiazepine drug. Oxazepam was the most frequently prescribed drug. Female patients, methadone-maintained patients and patients in the liberal programmes received a prescription more often. Prescribed doses were high and highest in the liberal programmes. Older patients received more hypnotics. Dose of maintenance drug was positively related to amount of anxiolytics prescribed.
This study showed that more benzodiazepines were prescribed to opioid maintenance treatment patients than previously shown by investigations using interview or urine analysis. The doses prescribed were generally high. In light of the negative outcomes following benzodiazepine use in these patients, Norwegian doctors need to review their prescription practices.
PubMed ID
17478058 View in PubMed
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The Camberwell assessment of need as an outcome measure in routine mental health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81849
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Sep;41(9):728-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Wennström Erik
Wiesel Frits-Axel
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Psychiatry, Uppsala University Hospital, 75017 Uppsala, Sweden. erik.wennstrom@neuro.uu.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Sep;41(9):728-33
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Periodicity
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Subsidiary findings in several studies indicate that the standard summary scores (total number of needs, met needs and unmet needs) of the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN) may conceal important differences among patient populations at the item level of the measure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in need and need status at the item level are adequately reflected by changes in the summary scores. METHODS: In a longitudinal design assessments of need in 1997 and 2003 of 192 outpatients (mean age 45.4 years, 78.1% psychotic disorders) in routine mental health care were compared. RESULTS: None of the summary scores changed between 1997 and 2003. This result, however, was contradicted by significant changes in needs at the item level. CONCLUSIONS: The summary scores conceal changes in need on the underlying items and thus is recommended not to be used as dependent measures when comparisons among populations or between points in time are of interest.
PubMed ID
16775754 View in PubMed
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CCPP-Copenhagen Community Psychiatric Project. Implementation of community mental health centres in Copenhagen: effects of service utilization, social integration, quality of life and positive and negative symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72833
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1996 Nov;31(6):336-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
M. Nordentoft
H C Knudsen
B. Jessen-Petersen
A. Krasnik
H. Saelan
P. Treufeldt
B. Wetcher
Author Affiliation
Bispebjerg Hospital, Department of Psychiatri E, Copenhagen NV, Denmark.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1996 Nov;31(6):336-44
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards - utilization
Denmark
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Social Support
Abstract
Deinstitutionalization of psychiatry in Denmark has been extensive and the number of psychiatric beds per 1,000 inhabitants is among the lowest in Europe. The effect of supplementing hospital treatment with treatment in community mental health centres was evaluated in a quasi-experimental design. The patient group examined consisted of patients with long-term contact with psychiatric services. When development in intervention and control districts was compared, the only significant difference was that the total patient group in the intervention district had an increased number of day attendances per year. Comparison of patients from intervention districts who attended day-centres regularly with patients from control districts before and after implementation of community mental health centres indicated that patients from intervention districts had a reduction in the use of inpatient services, a significant increase in quality of life and a significant decrease in the presence of the negative symptom, alogia. We concluded that implementation of community mental health centres can increase the quality of life for the patients and decrease the frequency of the negative symptom, alogia.
PubMed ID
8952373 View in PubMed
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Challenges to Improve Inter-Professional Care and Service Collaboration for People Living With Psychiatric Disabilities in Ordinary Housing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280702
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2016 Jan-Mar;25(1):44-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ann-Christine Andersson
Ingrid Ainalem
Agneta Berg
Ann-Christin Janlöv
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2016 Jan-Mar;25(1):44-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Focus Groups
Housing
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Mentally Disabled Persons
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Social Work - organization & administration - standards
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe health care- and social service professionals' experiences of a quality-improvement program implemented in the south of Sweden. The focus of the program was to develop inter-professional collaboration to improve care and service to people with psychiatric disabilities in ordinary housing. Focus group interviews and a thematic analysis were used. The result was captured as themes along steps in process. (I) Entering the quality-improvement program: Lack of information about the program, The challenge of getting started, and Approaching the resources reluctantly. (II) Doing the practice-based improvement work: Facing unprepared workplaces, and Doing twice the work. (III) Looking back--evaluation over 1 year: Balancing theoretical knowledge with practical training, and Considering profound knowledge as an integral part of work. The improvement process in clinical practice was found to be both time and energy consuming, yet worth the effort. The findings also indicate that collaboration across organizational boundaries was broadened, and the care and service delivery were improved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26783867 View in PubMed
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75 records – page 1 of 8.