Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

128 records – page 1 of 13.

A 15-year national follow-up: legislation is not enough to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162773
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Alice Keski-Valkama
Eila Sailas
Markku Eronen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Jouko Lönnqvist
Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
Author Affiliation
Vanha Vaasa Hospital, PO Box 13, Vaasa, 65381 Finland. alice.keski-valkama@vvs.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Coercion
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries
Restraint, Physical - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Abstract
Seclusion and restraint are frequent but controversial coercive measures used in psychiatric treatment. Legislative efforts have started to emerge to control the use of these measures in many countries. In the present study, the nationwide trends in the use of seclusion and restraint were investigated in Finland over a 15-year span which was characterised by legislative changes aiming to clarify and restrict the use of these measures.
The data were collected during a predetermined week in 1990, 1991, 1994, 1998 and 2004, using a structured postal survey of Finnish psychiatric hospitals. The numbers of inpatients during the study weeks were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Register.
The total number of the secluded and restrained patients declined as did the number of all inpatients during the study weeks, but the risk of being secluded or restrained remained the same over time when compared to the first study year. The duration of the restraint incidents did not change, but the duration of seclusion increased. A regional variation was found in the use of coercive measures.
Legislative changes solely cannot reduce the use of seclusion and restraint or change the prevailing treatment cultures connected with these measures. The use of seclusion and restraint should be vigilantly monitored and ethical questions should be under continuous scrutiny.
PubMed ID
17598058 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abuse in health care--routines for management of incidents?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200811
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Aug 25;96(34):3509
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-1999
Author
K. Aldén
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Aug 25;96(34):3509
Date
Aug-25-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Malpractice
Mandatory Reporting
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Advocacy
Sexual Harassment
Sweden
Violence
PubMed ID
10492549 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol prevention targeting licensed premises: a study of effects on violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9739
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):270-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Eva Wallin
Thor Norström
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):270-7
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Law Enforcement
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This research studied the effects of a community alcohol prevention program on violent crimes. Starting in 1996, a 10-year multicomponent program based on community mobilization, training in responsible beverage service for servers and stricter enforcement of existing alcohol laws has been conducted in Stockholm, Sweden. The project has been led by an action group consisting of members from the hospitality industry and the authorities. METHOD: We used a time-series quasi-experimental design that included a control area. Data on police-reported violence during the period of January 1994 to September 2000 were analyzed through ARIMA modeling. RESULTS: During the intervention period, violent crimes decreased significantly by 29% in the intervention area, controlled for the development in the control area. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention seems to have been successful in reducing violent crimes. This effect is most likely due to a combination of various policy changes initiated by the project. The findings support the notion that community action projects working on a local basis can be effective in decreasing alcohol-related problems at licensed premises.
PubMed ID
12713202 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the outcome of compulsory treatment orders on management of psychiatric patients at 2 McGill University-associated hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123619
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;57(6):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Arash Nakhost
John Christopher Perry
Daniel Frank
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Institute of Community and Family Psychiatry, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;57(6):359-65
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, University
Humans
Insanity Defense
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Prisoners - psychology
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Some literature suggests that compulsory community treatment orders (CTOs) are effective in reducing hospitalizations in a subgroup of psychiatric patients with histories of repeated hospitalization, allowing them to be treated in the community under less restrictive measures. However, studies have yielded contradictory findings, in part because of methodological differences. Our study examines the effectiveness of CTOs in reducing hospitalizations and increasing community tenure of such patients.
The sample included all psychiatric patients who had been given a CTO during a 9-year period at 2 of McGill University's hospitals. This is a naturalistic, observational, retrospective, before-and-after study where patients acted as their own control subjects. We examined variables, including the number, duration, and time to psychiatric admissions, comparing 4 time periods: early, pre-index, index (when the first CTO was in force), and post-index periods. The total study duration per subject encompasses the longest period of observation within existing studies in Canada.
Psychiatric patients with histories of frequent readmissions demonstrated a significant reduction in their number of hospitalizations as well as an increase in the median time to re-hospitalization, during the period when they were treated under a CTO. This effect of CTO was sustained even after the CTO had expired.
Our study suggests that CTOs are effective in assisting psychiatric patients with histories of repeated hospitalizations to live and be treated in the community, diminishing the occurrence of frequent hospitalization.
PubMed ID
22682573 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A time plan for better forensic psychiatry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121199
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Aug 21;132(15):1727-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2012
Author
Pål Grøndahl
Cato Grønnerød
Ulf Stridbeck
Henning Værøy
Harald Brauer
Author Affiliation
Kompetansesenter for sikkerhets-, fengsels- og rettspsykiatri, Oslo universitetssykehus, Norway. pagron@kompetanse-senteret.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Aug 21;132(15):1727-8
Date
Aug-21-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Checklist
Forensic Psychiatry - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Norway
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 16;132(19):2145; author reply 214523076470
PubMed ID
22929935 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beyond "bad manners": the power relations of "consumer participation" in Ontario's community mental health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209052
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1996;15(2):27-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Church
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1996;15(2):27-44
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Consumer Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
This article describes the work of the legislation subcommittee of the steering committee responsible for the implementation of the Graham Report, Ontario's current blueprint for community mental health. It describes barriers to psychiatric survivor participation in the subcommittee's 1990 provincial consultation, including professional/bureaucratic characterization of survivor actions during the event as "bad manners." I argue that this naming is an act of power. Conflicts arose because the two groups operate from different behavioural codes in which the pivotal issue, acted out indirectly in all kinds of interactions, was whether and how deeply to include personal experience and emotions as forms of knowledge. The cultural dimensions of "consumer participation" must be more broadly recognized and more consciously considered if this policy is to remain viable, particularly in a time of major economic restructuring.
PubMed ID
10166895 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian compulsory community treatment laws: recent reforms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176185
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2005 Jan-Feb;28(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
John E Gray
Richard L O'Reilly
Author Affiliation
Adult Mental Health Services, Ministry of Health Services, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. jegray@shaw.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2005 Jan-Feb;28(1):13-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Health Care Reform - legislation & jurisprudence
Hospitalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Informed consent
Mental Disorders - therapy
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Recurrence - prevention & control
Abstract
This paper addresses the principles underlying compulsory community treatment (CCT) and discusses the different provisions in Canada's twelve jurisdictions. Comparisons with different models of CCT in other countries are also drawn. CCT is not only intended to reduce relapses it is also a "least restrictive" alternative to in-patient detention. Seven of the twelve Canadian mental health acts allow conditional leave from hospital. Two jurisdictions provide community treatment orders, but require two or three previous in-patient admissions. Criteria for CCT, in most jurisdictions, includes that there is a "likelihood of significant mental or physical deterioration". The requirement for previous hospitalization for CCT in Canada, unlike other countries, precludes CCT for use with first episode patients. Some jurisdictions require consent for CCT. Most jurisdictions explicitly state that the services necessary for the CCT conditions must be available.
PubMed ID
15710446 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Canadian Mental Health Law: accelerating the redirection of the Ship of State].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144522
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):93-121
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
H Archibald Kaiser
Author Affiliation
Département de Psychiatrie, Université Dalhousie, Canada.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):93-121
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
International Cooperation - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Mentally Ill Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
United Nations
Abstract
In this article, some hopeful outlooks on the evolution of the law are identified and ways of assessing the state and progress of legislation are advanced, drawing from international organizations and some inspiring efforts in other countries. Potential contributors to the evolution of Canadian mental health law are surveyed. The author concludes that there are coherent ways of changing tack, although in this fraught legislative field, no one can make confident predictions about the future.
PubMed ID
20361111 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Canadian Mental Health Law: recognizing and rectifying a problematic situation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144523
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):75-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
H Archibald Kaiser
Author Affiliation
Département de Psychiatrie de l'Université Dalhousie, Canada.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):75-91
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Mentally Ill Persons - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This article explores several conundrums and attempts to identify ways of redirecting the Canadian ship of state. It first presents an overview of some of the salient features of the array of mainly coercive provincial and territorial mental health statutes. The failure in the main of the Charter to deliver on its early ostensible promises for people with mental health problems is assessed. Next, the author argues that extant legislation remains anchored in the medical model, when other human rights promoting paradigms transforms the statutory agenda.
PubMed ID
20361110 View in PubMed
Less detail

128 records – page 1 of 13.