Skip header and navigation

Refine By

328 records – page 1 of 33.

[25th anniversary of the RSMH (National Association for Social and Mental Health): campaign organization has been growing in the living rooms].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223085
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Sep 15;16(15):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1992
Author
C. Roxström
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Sep 15;16(15):12
Date
Sep-15-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Sweden
PubMed ID
1299097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acting on audit & feedback: a qualitative instrumental case study in mental health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295007
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-31-2018
Author
Monica Stolt Pedersen
Anne Landheim
Merete Møller
Lars Lien
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Concurrent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders, Innlandet Hospital Trust, P.B. 104, 2340, Brumunddal, Norway. monica.stolt.pedersen@sykehuset-innlandet.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Date
01-31-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Benchmarking
Evidence-Based Practice
Feedback
Health Personnel
Humans
Medical Audit
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement
Abstract
The National Guideline for Assessment, Treatment and Social Rehabilitation of Persons with Concurrent Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders, launched in 2012, is to be implemented in mental health services in Norway. Audit and feedback (A&F) is commonly used as the starting point of an implementation process. It aims to measure the research-practice gap, but its effect varies greatly. Less is known of how audit and feedback is used in natural settings. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate what is discussed and thematised when Quality Improvement (QI) teams in a District Psychiatric Centre (DPC) work to complete an action form as part of an A&F cycle in 2014.
This was an instrumental multiple case study involving four units in a DPC in Norway. We used open non-participant observation of QI team meetings in their natural setting, a total of seven teams and eleven meetings.
The discussions provided health professionals with insight into their own and their colleagues' practices. They revealed insufficient knowledge of substance-related disorders and experienced unclear role expectations. We found differences in how professional groups sought answers to questions of clinical practice and that they were concerned about whether new tasks fitted in with their routine ways of working.
Acting on A&F provided an opportunity to discuss practice in general, enhancing awareness of good practice. There was a general need for arenas to relate to practice and QI team meetings after A&F may well be a suitable arena for this. Self-assessment audits seem valuable, particular in areas where no benchmarked data exists, and there is a demand for implementation of new guidelines that might change routines and develop new roles. QI teams could benefit from having a unit leader present at meetings. Nurses and social educators and others turn to psychiatrists or psychologists for answers to clinical and organisational questions beyond guidelines, and show less confidence or routine in seeking research-based information. There is a general need to emphasise training in evidence-based practice and information seeking behaviour for all professional groups.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Oct 20;282(15):1458-65 PMID 10535437
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2016 Apr;21(2):91-100 PMID 26811374
Cites: Med Care. 2009 Mar;47(3):356-63 PMID 19194332
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2014 May;174(5):710-8 PMID 24663331
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2005 Jul 13;5:50 PMID 16011811
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):987-8 PMID 18981432
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2014 Nov;29(11):1534-41 PMID 24965281
Cites: Health Info Libr J. 2013 Sep;30(3):178-90 PMID 23981019
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Jun 13;(6):CD000259 PMID 22696318
Cites: Implement Sci. 2008 Oct 27;3:45 PMID 18954465
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2010 Mar;42(1):37-47 PMID 20464805
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2010 Jan 20;10:8 PMID 20089141
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Sep 6;296(9):1094-102 PMID 16954489
Cites: BMJ Qual Saf. 2015 Jun;24(6):393-9 PMID 25918432
Cites: BMC Res Notes. 2011 Jun 22;4:212 PMID 21696585
Cites: Addict Sci Clin Pract. 2012 May 02;7:7 PMID 23186245
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2012 Feb;68(2):379-90 PMID 21707727
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 2004 Feb;8(6):iii-iv, 1-72 PMID 14960256
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2007 Mar;21(2):207-16 PMID 17365393
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Oct 30;329(7473):999 PMID 15514342
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2006 Dec;15(6):433-6 PMID 17142594
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2013 Oct;19(5):902-8 PMID 22672429
Cites: Implement Sci. 2006 Apr 28;1:9 PMID 16722539
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2008 Sep 12;8:38 PMID 18789150
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2010 May;79(5):305-23 PMID 20189451
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2005 Jul 27;5:23 PMID 16048653
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 Sep 1;154:1-13 PMID 26072219
Cites: Implement Sci. 2007 Mar 26;2:8 PMID 17386102
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2011 Fall;31(4):258-64 PMID 22189989
Cites: Implement Sci. 2012 Jan 09;7:1 PMID 22230594
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013 Nov 24;13:486 PMID 24267663
Cites: Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2009;17(1):24-34 PMID 19205964
Cites: Int J Ment Health Syst. 2011 May 23;5(1):13 PMID 21600067
Cites: Implement Sci. 2014 Jan 17;9:14 PMID 24438584
Cites: Eur Addict Res. 2003 Jan;9(1):8-17 PMID 12566793
Cites: Implement Sci. 2015 Apr 21;10:53 PMID 25895742
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;61(8):807-16 PMID 15289279
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2006 Feb;21 Suppl 2:S14-20 PMID 16637955
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 Jan 17;(1):CD009780 PMID 24443146
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Nov 22;327(7425):1219-21 PMID 14630762
Cites: Implement Sci. 2012 May 31;7:50 PMID 22651257
PubMed ID
29386020 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activity-based assessment (BIA)--inter-rater reliability and staff experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161401
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2008 Jun;15(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Lars Kjellin
Rosmarie Cizinsky Sjödahl
Mona Eklund
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Centre and Department of Clinical Medicine, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lars.kjellin@orebroll.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2008 Jun;15(2):75-81
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Attitude of Health Personnel
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Observer Variation
Occupational Therapy - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
The BIA method, based on assessment of patients in activities, was developed to enable reliable assessment of clients' occupational functioning. The method evaluates the patient's ego functions and capacity for activity and participation. The aims of this study were to examine inter-rater reliability for the BIA method and to compare the experiences of staff working with the BIA with those of staff using standard assessment (SA). In SA, the patient's activity problems and capacities were assessed without using any structured protocol. Four staff members worked according to the BIA method and eight according to SA. The estimation of reliability was based on data from 14 patients who went through the BIA and were assessed by five staff members. These assessments resulted in all in about 400 statements, which were classified and compared for agreement between raters. In order to address the aim concerning staff experiences, a questionnaire was filled out anonymously by the staff. The inter-rater reliability of the nine ego functions varied from 0.76 to 1.00. The scale was deemed appropriate by the BIA staff and they had significantly higher median ratings on work satisfaction and appropriateness than the SA staff. In conclusion, the inter-rater reliability of the BIA was found to be good. The BIA method also seems to have a high degree of appropriateness, constituting a promising assessment tool when occupational functioning is addressed.
PubMed ID
17852959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adding quality to day centre activities for people with psychiatric disabilities: Staff perceptions of an intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273214
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016;23(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Mona Eklund
Christel Leufstadius
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016;23(1):13-22
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Day Care Centers - organization & administration - standards
Community Mental Health Centers - organization & administration
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Focus Groups
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Narration
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Quality Improvement
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate an intervention aimed at enriching day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities by exploring staff experiences from developing and implementing the intervention.
Each staff group developed a tailor-made intervention plan, following a manual, for how to enrich the day centre. They received supervision and support from the research team. The study was based on focus-group interviews with a total of 13 staff members at four day centres. Narrative analysis with a thematic approach was used. A first round resulted in one narrative per centre. These centre-specific narratives were then integrated into a common narrative that covered all the data.
A core theme emerged: User involvement permeated the implementation process and created empowerment. It embraced four themes forming a timeline: "Mix of excitement, worries and hope", "Confirmation and development through dialogue, feedback and guidance", "The art of integrating new activities and strategies with the old", and "Empowerment-engendered future aspirations".
The users' involvement and empowerment were central for the staff in accomplishing the desired changes in services, as were their own reflections and learning. A possible factor that may have contributed to the positive outcomes was that those who were central in developing the plan were the same as those who implemented it.
PubMed ID
26206294 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Admission of acute cases to an institution for the mentally deficient. A survey of fluctuation and possibilities for rehabilitation of the mentally deficient admitted to an acute ward during a two-year period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111032
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1967 Nov 16;129(46):1570-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-16-1967

Adolescent girls in need of protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245887
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1980 Apr;50(2):264-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980
Author
J A Byles
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1980 Apr;50(2):264-78
Date
Apr-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse
Child Welfare
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - rehabilitation
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Ontario
Prisons
Residential Treatment
Runaway Behavior
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
This descriptive study of 120 girls removed temporarily from parental care during early adolescence raises questions regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of current intervention strategies. The findings suggest that clinical and legal efforts on behalf of girls such as these, who have been victims of neglect, deprivation, and abuse, are likely to remain unsatisfactory in the absence of a broad societal commitment to the needs and rights of children.
PubMed ID
7361875 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A halfway house: its structure, function and results obtained in the course of the last two years].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111482
Source
Laval Med. 1967 Jan;38(1):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1967
Author
L. Crégheur
P E Phoenix
Source
Laval Med. 1967 Jan;38(1):63-6
Date
Jan-1967
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Mental Health Services
Halfway Houses
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
5628187 View in PubMed
Less detail

An aftercare program for problem patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244395
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Jul;32(7):493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Author
D A Wasylenki
E. Plummer
S. Littmann
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Jul;32(7):493-6
Date
Jul-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aftercare - organization & administration
Aged
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Recurrence
Social Adjustment
Abstract
The high readmission rates of discharged psychiatric patients have forced mental health professionals to play closer attention to aftercare planning. A program was developed at a psychiatric hospital in Ontario in 1977 to deal with "problem patients"--those who were deemed difficult to place in the community by the referral person or department. The program was characterized by shared institutional-community staffing, systematic aftercare assessment and planning, a crisis intervention approach to discharge, the use of a transitional staff member with patients, and the development of close relationships with community agencies. Study data show that the program was effective in limiting the number of readmissions during its first two years to 20 per cent.
PubMed ID
6263785 View in PubMed
Less detail

An agency model for developing and coordinating psychiatric aftercare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245350
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
S J Freeman
L. Fischer
A. Sheldon
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1980 Nov;31(11):768-71
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare - organization & administration - standards
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Deinstitutionalization
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Ontario
Patient Advocacy
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
The development of coordinated systems for delivery of aftercare services to psychiatric patients has lagged far behind the theoretical emphasis on community maintenance. From a collaboration of 29 treatment and rehabilitation facilities, an independent agency was established to improve aftercare services in Metropolitan Toronto. Known as Community Resources Consultants, the agency was designed to facilitate and rationalize the use of existing services, to identify gaps in service, to initiate or cooperate in the development of new services, and to involve hospital and community service personnel in raising the level of expertise in the provision of aftercare. Formal and informal assessments indicate that CRC has had a positive effect on the provision of aftercare services and on professionals' level of awareness of aftercare priorities.
PubMed ID
6253385 View in PubMed
Less detail

328 records – page 1 of 33.