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143 records – page 1 of 15.

Are therapists uniformly effective across patient outcome domains? A study on therapist effectiveness in two different treatment contexts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280038
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2016 Jul;63(4):367-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Helene A Nissen-Lie
Simon B Goldberg
William T Hoyt
Fredrik Falkenström
Rolf Holmqvist
Stevan Lars Nielsen
Bruce E Wampold
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2016 Jul;63(4):367-78
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Counseling - methods
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Mental health
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
As established in several studies, therapists differ in effectiveness. A vital research task now is to understand what characterizes more or less effective therapists, and investigate whether this differential effectiveness systematically depends on client factors, such as the type of mental health problem. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether therapists are universally effective across patient outcome domains reflecting different areas of mental health functioning. Data were obtained from 2 sites: the Research Consortium of Counseling and Psychological Services in Higher Education (N = 5,828) in the United States and from primary and secondary care units (N = 616) in Sweden. Outcome domains were assessed via the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (Lambert et al., 2004) and the CORE-OM (Evans et al., 2002). Multilevel models with observations nested within patients were used to derive a reliable estimate for each patient's change (which we call a multilevel growth d) based on all reported assessment points. Next, 2 multilevel confirmatory factor analytic models were fit in which these effect sizes (multilevel ds) for the 3 subscales of the OQ-45 (Study 1) and 6 subscales of CORE-OM (Study 2) were indicators of 1 common latent factor at the therapist level. In both data sets, such a model, reflecting a global therapist effectiveness factor, yielded large factor loadings and excellent model fit. Results suggest that therapists effective (or ineffective) within one outcome domain are also effective within another outcome domain. Tentatively, therapist effectiveness can thus be conceived of as a global construct. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
27124549 View in PubMed
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Assessment for three different forms of short-term dynamic psychotherapy. Findings from the Bergen Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233941
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 1988;49(3-4):153-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
K. Barth
G. Nielsen
O E Havik
B. Haver
E. Mølstad
H. Rogge
M. Skåtun
A N Heiberg
H. Ursin
Author Affiliation
University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 1988;49(3-4):153-9
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychoanalytic Interpretation
Psychoanalytic Therapy - methods
Psychological Tests
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Abstract
Forty-four patients were assessed for three different short-term dynamic therapies, with an evaluation form based on Sifneos' criteria for Short-Term Anxiety-Provoking Psychotherapy (STAPP). Ten patients were ascribed to STAPP, 22 patients to Malan's Brief Psychotherapy (BP), and 12 patients to a more eclectic/integrative form of brief psychotherapy in this project called the FIAT model. 78% of the patients completed their treatment in agreement with the original ascription to therapy, with good results for all three therapies. The evaluation form seems to be a reliable and valid instrument offering a good and systematic basis for designing a tailor-made treatment format for different types of patients.
PubMed ID
3237966 View in PubMed
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[Attitude of the chronically ill towards psychiatric hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240961
Source
Encephale. 1984;10(1):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
G B Gravel
R. Boyer
Y. Lamontagne
Source
Encephale. 1984;10(1):39-44
Date
1984
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Chronic Disease
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Personnel, Hospital
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
Three hundred chronic mental patients participated in a survey to evaluate their attitudes towards the 2,000 beds hospital where they were staying. The mean duration of the actual hospitalization was 12.1 years and most patients (77.9%) suffered from schizophrenia or other psychoses. On the whole, results show a relatively high level of patients' satisfaction. Single, non psychotic and self-sufficient patients who have not been hospitalized many times and do not want to leave the institution are more inclined to be positive towards the psychiatric milieu. The authors report that participation of chronic mental patients in a survey can be reliable and give helpful suggestions in relation with the evaluation of psychiatric care and the improvement of the quality of life in state hospitals. They conclude that it will always be difficult to discharge satisfied patients without offering the same support and community services that they find in a state hospital.
PubMed ID
6734509 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to coercion at two Norwegian psychiatric units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141313
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;65(2):133-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Rolf Wynn
Ann-Mari Kvalvik
Torfinn Hynnekleiv
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Centre of Northern Norway, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.wynn@gmail.com
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;65(2):133-7
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Emergencies
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Norway
Patient Isolation - psychology
Psychiatric Aides - psychology
Questionnaires
Restraint, Physical
Schizophrenia - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self-Injurious Behavior - psychology - therapy
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Violence - psychology
Abstract
Many countries allow for the use of restraint and seclusion in emergencies with psychiatric inpatients. Authors have suggested that the attitudes of staff are of importance to the use of restraint and seclusion.
To examine the attitudes to coercion at two Norwegian psychiatric units. In contrast to the idea that attitudes to coercion vary much within and between institutions, we hypothesized that staff's attitudes would be quite similar.
We distributed a questionnaire to staff at two psychiatric units in two Norwegian counties. Eight wards were included. The questionnaire contained fictitious case histories with one patient that was violent and one patient that was self-harming, and staff were asked to describe how they would intervene in each emergency. Emergency strategies were sorted according to degree of restrictiveness, from the highly restrictive (restraint, seclusion) to the unrestrictive (talking, offering medication). Data were analysed with regression analyses.
There was only a limited degree of variance in how staff at the different units and various groups of staff responded. Staff were more likely to favour a highly restrictive intervention when the patients were physically violent. Male staff and unskilled staff were significantly more prone to choosing a highly restrictive intervention.
Our hypothesis was confirmed, as there was a limited degree of variance in staff's responses with respect to degree of restrictiveness. The study supported the idea that a range of different interventions are used in emergency situations.
PubMed ID
20735188 View in PubMed
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[Beggars, drug abuse and care. Results from studies on begging in Copenhagen and Stockholm]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9801
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Dec 19;99(51-52):5196-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-19-2002

Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279670
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jun;36(6):407-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Lilas Ali
Barbro Krevers
Ingela Skärsäter
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jun;36(6):407-15
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Caregivers - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Friends - psychology
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16-25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.
PubMed ID
26241566 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232240
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1988 Nov;33(8):696-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
A K Malla
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1988 Nov;33(8):696-701
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Combined Modality Therapy
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Suicide - prevention & control
Violence
Abstract
Case records of all non-forensic psychiatric admissions (n = 5,729), over a three year period, to all the inpatient psychiatric facilities, within one geographic area were studied on a number of demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics. Patients who had received E.C.T. were compared with those who did not receive tis treatment. The results showed that a high proportion (21%) had received E.C.T. In comparison with patients not receiving E.C.T., E.C.T. recipients were significantly older, more often female, had greater number of previous admissions, greater incidence of violent behaviour, and longer stays in hospital. E.C.T. patients did not differ from others on social class, education, and marital status, nor was E.C.T. prescribed more often to patients who had demonstrated suicidal behaviour, even if they had a diagnosis of depression. E.C.T. and non E.C.T. patients received an equal number of psychotropic drugs.
PubMed ID
3203270 View in PubMed
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[Child-oriented interviews can result in good solution of the problems. Parents with acute psychiatric disorders need talks about their children's situation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37054
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Aug 7;88(32-33):2592-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-1991

The church and community psychiatric services in a region of northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72850
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1996 Sep;31(5):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
K W Sørgaard
T. Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Nordland Psykiatriske Sykehus, Bodø, Norway.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1996 Sep;31(5):266-71
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Motivation
Norway
Pastoral Care
Patient care team
Referral and Consultation
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Through questionnaries sent to all priests in a county in northern Norway (n = 78) we described and analysed the relations between the priests and a community mental health service. Results showed that the priests had contact with many persons with mental problems and also with many psychiatric patients. Priests described their work with psychiatric problems and psychiatric patients as based on a "holistic" concept of man, which they did not consider was the case in the professional work carried out by the psychiatric services. These ideological differnces did not result in the priests being unwilling to motivate persons to contact the mental health organisations, as four out of five priests had referred persons to psychiatric treatment in the 12 months before the study. There was also a strong wish among the priests for more contact with psychiatric professionals.
PubMed ID
8909116 View in PubMed
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Clinical holistic medicine: mental disorders in a holistic perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51851
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 12;5:313-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Niels Jørgen Andersen
Shimshon Neikrug
Isack Kandel
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Holistic Medicine and Quality of Life Research Center, Teglgårdstraede 4-5, DK-1452 Copenhagen K, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2005 Apr 12;5:313-23
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Character
Female
Goals
Holistic Health
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Personality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Suicide
Abstract
From a holistic perspective, psychiatric diseases are caused by the patient's unwillingness to assume responsibility for his life, existence, and personal relations. The loss of responsibility arises from the repression of the fundamental existential dimensions of the patients. Repression of love and purpose causes depersonalization (i.e., a lack of responsibility for being yourself and for the contact with others, loss of direction and purpose in life). Repression of strength in mind and emotions leads to derealization (the breakdown of the reality testing, often with mental delusions and hallucinations). The repression of joy and gender leads to devitalization (emotional emptiness, loss of joy, personal energy, sexuality, and pleasure in life). The losses of existential dimensions are invariably connected to traumas with life-denying decisions. Healing the wounds of the soul by holding and processing will lead to the recovery of the person's character, purpose of life, and existential responsibility. It can be very difficult to help a psychotic patient. The physician must first love his patient unconditionally and then fully understand the patient in order to meet and support the patient to initiate the holistic process of healing. It takes motivation and willingness to suffer on behalf of the patients in order to heal, as the existential and emotional pain of the traumas resulting in insanity is often overwhelming. We believe that most psychiatric diseases can be alleviated or cured by the loving and caring physician who masters the holistic toolbox. Further research is needed to document the effect of holistic medicine in psychiatry.
PubMed ID
15962198 View in PubMed
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143 records – page 1 of 15.