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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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Adolescents on a general hospital psychiatric unit: problems and remedies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244069
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Nov;32(11):782-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981
Author
G. Molnar
A. Bernardo
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Nov;32(11):782-5
Date
Nov-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acting Out
Adolescent
Attitude of Health Personnel
Hospitals, General
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Admission
Patient Care Planning
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Abstract
The care and treatment of adolescents on an adult acute psychiatric unit in a general hospital can pose serious problems for unit staff. Adolescents with behavior or character problems who prove violent or manipulative can disrupt treatment of both the adolescent and adult patients on the unit. Yet the demand for immediate treatment for many adolescents and the accessibility of general hospital psychiatric units often mean that adolescents may placed there inappropriately. This paper describes how an adult acute unit in a general hospital solved the problems caused by acting-out, manipulative adolescents on the unit. A committee found problems in inappropriate admissions, unworkable treatment plans, management of acting-out behaviors, case disposition, and staff attitudes. Remedies came in the form of more specific admission and discharge guidelines, strict enforcement of those guidelines, staff discussion of treatment plans, an inservice education program, and improved liaison with community facilities for adolescents.
PubMed ID
7286932 View in PubMed
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Assaultiveness among institutionalised adults with mental retardation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73236
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;164(1):62-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
O M Linaker
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;164(1):62-8
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Care Rationing
Humans
Institutionalization
Intelligence
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental Retardation - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient care team
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Violence
Abstract
In an institution, 57 people with mental retardation who had shown assaultive behaviour during the last year were compared with a control group of 57 people in the same institution, matched by sex, level of retardation and age. The study group were younger and had more people with a moderate level of mental retardation than the total population of the institution. Compared with the controls, the assaultive group had more resources available, had more psychopathology, consumed more psychotropic drugs, and had a higher frequency of other problem behaviour. We found no group differences in personal skills, including communication. Generally, the observed covariates of assaultive behaviour resembled that seen in other populations with assaultive behaviour.
PubMed ID
8137111 View in PubMed
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Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1992;38(2):120-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Ojanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1992;38(2):120-30
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Dangerous Behavior
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Public Opinion
Rehabilitation, Vocational - psychology
Abstract
A study of attitudes towards mental patients was made using a questionnaire developed by Lehtinen and Väisänen. Five hundred and fourteen persons from different parts of Finland filled in the questionnaire. The attitudes were generally positive, although, as in other studies, the attitudes of those older and less educated were more negative compared with the other groups. This result was interpreted as a generational effect, which will vanish as the educational level of the population increases. The questionnaire also included questions about the attitudes and behaviour of 'other people'. The attitudes of 'other people' were thought to be very negative compared with one's own attitudes.
PubMed ID
1506136 View in PubMed
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Beyond "bad manners": the power relations of "consumer participation" in Ontario's community mental health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209052
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1996;15(2):27-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Church
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1996;15(2):27-44
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Consumer Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
This article describes the work of the legislation subcommittee of the steering committee responsible for the implementation of the Graham Report, Ontario's current blueprint for community mental health. It describes barriers to psychiatric survivor participation in the subcommittee's 1990 provincial consultation, including professional/bureaucratic characterization of survivor actions during the event as "bad manners." I argue that this naming is an act of power. Conflicts arose because the two groups operate from different behavioural codes in which the pivotal issue, acted out indirectly in all kinds of interactions, was whether and how deeply to include personal experience and emotions as forms of knowledge. The cultural dimensions of "consumer participation" must be more broadly recognized and more consciously considered if this policy is to remain viable, particularly in a time of major economic restructuring.
PubMed ID
10166895 View in PubMed
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Can suicide research lead to suicide prevention?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201470
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jun;99(6):397-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
P B Mortensen
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jun;99(6):397-8
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cognition
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Research
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Notes
Comment On: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jun;99(6):419-2210408263
Comment On: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jun;99(6):423-3110408264
Comment On: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jun;99(6):407-1110408261
Comment On: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jun;99(6):412-810408262
PubMed ID
10408259 View in PubMed
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Changes in the pattern of aggressive behaviour among inpatients with changed ward organization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216424
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
T. Palmstierna
B. Wistedt
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Dependency Clinic, Karolinska Institute, St. Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):32-5
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aggression - psychology
Female
Hospital Bed Capacity
Hospital Restructuring
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Personality Assessment
Professional-Patient Relations
Risk Management
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
Aggressive behaviour by psychiatric inpatients was investigated on the same ward during two separate 6-month periods before and after a 50% decrease in number of beds but without changes in catchment area. Character of the patient group, patient turnover and medical practices as well as total number of staff on duty on the ward was virtually the same during the two periods. It is therefore assumed that differences in aggressive behaviour are mainly explained by effects due to the decreased number of beds per se. It was found that the 50% reduction did not affect the overall aggression frequency. However, inter-patient violence increased while the number of more severe aggressive incidents towards staff members decreased.
PubMed ID
7754783 View in PubMed
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Choice and outcome in mental health supported housing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146181
Source
Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2010;33(3):232-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Jill G Grant
Anne Westhues
Author Affiliation
University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. jgrant@uwindsor.ca
Source
Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2010;33(3):232-5
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Choice Behavior
Female
Group Homes
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Nondirective Therapy
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper discusses choice in mental health supported housing, providing results from a longitudinal study of two models of supported housing (a higher support and a lower support model).
The progress of 27 tenants at the two sites was tracked on measures of satisfaction with housing, social support satisfaction, mental health, physical health, and mastery over the course of one year. Measurements were taken at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months.
Although there were trends toward positive changes at both sites, with the Bonferroni adjustment, only positive within group changes in perceptions of physical health between baseline and 12 months at the higher support site endured. There were no significant differences in changes between the two sites.
We conclude that there appears to be some support for the positive effects of choice in mental health supported housing. Further research in this area will require flexible programming and funding that create opportunities for true partnerships with consumer-survivors.
PubMed ID
20061260 View in PubMed
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Chronically mentally ill individuals re-entering the community after hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202898
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 1998 Dec;5(6):497-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
P. Montgomery
B. Johnson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 1998 Dec;5(6):497-503
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Child
Chronic Disease
Community Mental Health Services
Deinstitutionalization - organization & administration
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this phenomenological study was to increase the understanding of the experiences of chronically mentally ill individuals who are re-entering the community after hospitalization. Ten individuals from an acute care psychiatric hospital who had had two or more admissions within a 12-month period were interviewed, shortly before discharge and subsequently between two and four times while in the community. Three interrelated themes emerged. First, at the time of discharge, the optimism of the participants about returning home was tempered by a realistic recognition of their problems. As time passed, their problems seemed to become their preoccupying focus and optimism faded. Second, for most of the participants, relationships with others, positive, negative or both, played an important role in their return to home and community. Third, participants who experienced more positive social relationships also described individual achievements and community involvement. The re-entry process was not a smooth transition for these individuals.
PubMed ID
10076280 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.