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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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10-year trends of educational differences in long sickness absence due to mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285500
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2017
Author
Hilla Sumanen
Olli Pietiläinen
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Date
Jul-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education - classification - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental disorders are a key cause of sickness absence (SA) and challenge prolonging working careers. Thus, evidence on the development of SA trends is needed. In this study, educational differences in long SAs due to mental disorders were examined in two age groups among employees of the City of Helsinki from 2004 to 2013.
All permanently and temporarily employed staff aged 18-34 and 35-49 were included in the analyses (n=~27800 per year). SA spells of =14 days due to mental disorders were examined annually. Education was classified to higher and lower levels. Joinpoint regression was used to identify major turning points in SA trends.
Joinpoint regression models showed that lower educated groups had more long SAs spells due to mental disorders than those groups with higher education. SA trends decreased during the study period in all studied age and educational groups. Lower educated age groups had similar SA trends. Younger employees with higher education had the fewest SAs.
A clear educational gradient was found in long SAs due to mental disorders during the study period. SA trends decreased from 2004 to 2013.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28496028 View in PubMed
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Abnormalities of growth in 7- to 18-year-old psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38181
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Mar;28(2):269-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
A. Karlsson
C. Gillberg
P. Karlberg
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Mar;28(2):269-73
Date
Mar-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Food
Growth Disorders - complications
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - complications
Abstract
The growth curves of all nonimmigrant school-age children living in one district of Malmö, Sweden and treated at the Department of Child and Youth Psychiatry during 1983 were investigated. The study group consisted of 40 children. Twenty-five of these children (63%) showed abnormal growth compared to 6 children (15%) with abnormal growth in an age-and sex-matched nonpsychiatric control population (p less than 0.001). A majority of the children with abnormal growth exhibited deviant growth within the first 4 years of life, usually several years before showing any psychiatric symptoms. These results, if borne out by additional studies, may have important clinical applications in the fields of developmental medicine and child psychiatry.
PubMed ID
2925582 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation mechanisms of chronically mentally ill patients in daily life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227524
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1991;16(2):99-120
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
Y. Lecomte
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1991;16(2):99-120
Date
1991
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Chronic Disease
Community Mental Health Centers
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Quebec
Social Work, Psychiatric
Abstract
In this article, the author presents the main results of an exploratory clinical study aimed at identifying the adaptation mechanisms used by chronic psychiatric patients. These patients had been treated and followed by an external clinic located in an underprivileged urban environment. Upon the analysis of social worker's observations, the author was able to pinpoint 39 adaptation mechanisms within five areas of daily life: economical, residential, temporal, interpersonal and therapeutic. In conclusion, the author emphasizes on the six operating parameters of these adaptation mechanisms.
PubMed ID
1810392 View in PubMed
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Adolescents on a general hospital psychiatric unit: problems and remedies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244069
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Nov;32(11):782-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981
Author
G. Molnar
A. Bernardo
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Nov;32(11):782-5
Date
Nov-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acting Out
Adolescent
Attitude of Health Personnel
Hospitals, General
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Admission
Patient Care Planning
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Abstract
The care and treatment of adolescents on an adult acute psychiatric unit in a general hospital can pose serious problems for unit staff. Adolescents with behavior or character problems who prove violent or manipulative can disrupt treatment of both the adolescent and adult patients on the unit. Yet the demand for immediate treatment for many adolescents and the accessibility of general hospital psychiatric units often mean that adolescents may placed there inappropriately. This paper describes how an adult acute unit in a general hospital solved the problems caused by acting-out, manipulative adolescents on the unit. A committee found problems in inappropriate admissions, unworkable treatment plans, management of acting-out behaviors, case disposition, and staff attitudes. Remedies came in the form of more specific admission and discharge guidelines, strict enforcement of those guidelines, staff discussion of treatment plans, an inservice education program, and improved liaison with community facilities for adolescents.
PubMed ID
7286932 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' utilisation of psychiatric care, neighbourhoods and neighbourhood socioeconomic deprivation: a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106043
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e81127
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna-Karin Ivert
Marie Torstensson Levander
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e81127
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Databases, Factual
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - utilization
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Multilevel Analysis
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Mental health problems among adolescents have become a major public health issue, and it is therefore important to increase knowledge on the contextual determinants of adolescent mental health. One such determinant is the socioeconomic structure of the neighbourhood. The present study has two central objectives, (i) to examine if neighbourhood socioeconomic deprivation is associated to individual variations in utilisation of psychiatric care in a Swedish context, and (ii) to investigate if neighbourhood boundaries are a valid construct for identifying contexts that influence individual variations in psychiatric care utilization. Data were obtained from the Longitudinal Multilevel Analysis in Scania (LOMAS) database. The study population consists of all boys and girls aged 13-18 years (N=18,417), who were living in the city of Malmö, Sweden, in 2005. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the probability of psychiatric care utilisation. The results from the study indicate that the neighbourhood of residence had little influence on psychiatric care utilisation. Although we initially found a variation between neighbourhoods, this general contextual effect was very small (i.e. 1.6%). The initial conclusive association between the neighbourhood level of disadvantage and psychiatric care utilisation (specific contextual effect) disappeared following adjustment for individual and family level variables. Our results suggest the neighbourhoods in Malmö (at least measured in terms of SAMS-areas), do not provide accurate information for discriminating adolescents utilisation of psychiatric care. The SAMS-areas appears to be an inappropriate construct of the social environment that influences adolescent utilisation of psychiatric care. Therefore, public health interventions should be directed to the whole city rather than to specific neighbourhoods. However, since geographical, social or cultural contexts may be important for our understanding of adolescent mental health further research is needed to identify such contexts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24260548 View in PubMed
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Age and social support perception in Eastern Europe: Social change and support in four rapidly changing countries

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78243
Source
British Journal of Social Psychology. 2006 Dec;45(Pt 4):799-815
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Goodwin, R
Author Affiliation
School of Social Sciences and Law, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middx UB8 3PH, UK. robin.goodwin@brunel.ac.uk
Source
British Journal of Social Psychology. 2006 Dec;45(Pt 4):799-815
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude - ethnology
Byelarus
Female
Georgia (Republic)
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Russia
Social Change
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Despite a growing literature on social support processes across the life-span, few studies have examined support perceptions in societies undergoing rapid social transition. This study reports data on age, support and mental health from 2672 participants in four former Soviet nations. Results suggest a small but significant decline in overall support across age (r = -.12), with this slope significantly influenced by nationality and gender. Mental health also declines with age (r = -.15), with tangible support having the greatest mediational effect on the age-mental health relationship. These findings are discussed in the light of the continuing economic and social strains influencing the inhabitants of this region.
PubMed ID
17393881 View in PubMed
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An isolated involvement in mental health care - experiences of parents of young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281721
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Apr;26(7-8):1053-1065
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Birgitta Andershed
Mats Ewertzon
Anita Johansson
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Apr;26(7-8):1053-1065
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Family
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore parents' involvement in the informal and professional care of their young adult child with mental illness. A further aim was to examine concepts in the caring theory of 'Involvement in the light-Involvement in the dark' in the context of mental health care.
Mental illness has increased among young people in high-income countries, and suicide is now the leading cause of death for this group. Because of their disease, these young people may have difficulty in carrying out daily, taken-for-granted, tasks. Consequently, they often become dependent on their parents, and their parents shoulder a considerable responsibility.
A secondary descriptive design with a deductive content analysis was used.
Ten parents who have a son or daughter with long-term mental illness (aged 18-25 years) were interviewed. The deductive analysis was based on the caring theory of 'Involvement in the light-Involvement in the dark'.
The results are described using the following concepts in the theory: 'Knowing', 'Doing', 'Being' and 'Attitude of the health professionals'. The result are to a great extent consistent with the 'Involvement in the dark' metaphor, which describes an isolated involvement in which the parents were not informed, seen or acknowledged by the health professionals. Continuous support by professionals with a positive attitude was described as being of decisive importance for meaningful involvement. The theory's transferability is strengthened to the mental health care context.
Parents have a considerable need for knowledge that can enable them to choose how they should act (be) and what they should do, in order to help and support their child.
Since the patient, the family members and the professionals are mutually dependent, it is important to make use of each other's knowledge in a partnership to achieve a common caring strategy.
PubMed ID
27570938 View in PubMed
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Are therapists uniformly effective across patient outcome domains? A study on therapist effectiveness in two different treatment contexts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280038
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2016 Jul;63(4):367-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Helene A Nissen-Lie
Simon B Goldberg
William T Hoyt
Fredrik Falkenström
Rolf Holmqvist
Stevan Lars Nielsen
Bruce E Wampold
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2016 Jul;63(4):367-78
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Counseling - methods
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Mental health
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
As established in several studies, therapists differ in effectiveness. A vital research task now is to understand what characterizes more or less effective therapists, and investigate whether this differential effectiveness systematically depends on client factors, such as the type of mental health problem. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether therapists are universally effective across patient outcome domains reflecting different areas of mental health functioning. Data were obtained from 2 sites: the Research Consortium of Counseling and Psychological Services in Higher Education (N = 5,828) in the United States and from primary and secondary care units (N = 616) in Sweden. Outcome domains were assessed via the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (Lambert et al., 2004) and the CORE-OM (Evans et al., 2002). Multilevel models with observations nested within patients were used to derive a reliable estimate for each patient's change (which we call a multilevel growth d) based on all reported assessment points. Next, 2 multilevel confirmatory factor analytic models were fit in which these effect sizes (multilevel ds) for the 3 subscales of the OQ-45 (Study 1) and 6 subscales of CORE-OM (Study 2) were indicators of 1 common latent factor at the therapist level. In both data sets, such a model, reflecting a global therapist effectiveness factor, yielded large factor loadings and excellent model fit. Results suggest that therapists effective (or ineffective) within one outcome domain are also effective within another outcome domain. Tentatively, therapist effectiveness can thus be conceived of as a global construct. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
27124549 View in PubMed
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479 records – page 1 of 48.