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91 records – page 1 of 10.

Adolescents' adverse experiences and mental health in a prospective perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142470
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):58-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
O R Haavet
Å. Sagatun
L. Lien
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, Section for General Practice, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. o.r.haavet@medisin.uio.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):58-63
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Offenses - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Time Factors
Violence - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study is to examine the possible changes in depressive symptoms related to various adverse experiences, based on a three-year follow-up among adolescents.
All 10(th) graders invited to enter the youth section of the Oslo Health Study 2001 (n = 3,811) constituted a baseline of a longitudinal study. A high level of mental distress (Hscl-10 score = 1.85) according to the different life experiences was compared, at baseline (15 years) and follow-up (18 years).
All adverse experiences were associated with a high Hscl-10 score except parents not living together and death of a close person at 15 and 18 years for boys, and death of a close person at 18 years of age for girls. A development from high Hscl-10 score at baseline to low score at follow up was defined as recovery from mental distress. The proportion of the youth that had a high Hscl-10 score related to reporting adverse life experiences at age 15, followed by a low Hscl-10 score three years later proved to be between 44% and 89% among boys and between 16% and 31% among girls.
From a three year longitudinal perspective the recovery from mental distress is substantial and higher among boys than among girls. However, mental distress seems to persist in a considerable proportion of the adolescents. Consequently, it is insufficient to brush aside traumas and hurt and rely on a time healing process only.
PubMed ID
20595249 View in PubMed
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An overview of mental health services for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the 1990s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3365
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1992 Mar;43(3):257-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S H Nelson
G F McCoy
M. Stetter
W C Vanderwagen
Author Affiliation
Indian Health Service, U.S. Public Health Service, Albuquerque, NM 87102.
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1992 Mar;43(3):257-61
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Risk factors
Social Environment
United States
United States Indian Health Service - organization & administration
Abstract
Native Americans appear to be at higher risk than other U.S. ethnic groups for mental health problems, including depression, substance abuse, domestic violence, and suicide. Despite recent increases in the federal budget for mental health services for Native Americans, less than 50 percent of the estimated need for ambulatory services is being met. Initiatives to improve the quantity and quality of mental health services for Native Americans in the 1990s include development of a national mental health plan, increased technical assistance to Native American communities, additional training and research, and continued attention to standards that promote high-quality, culturally relevant care. Tribes themselves are seen as the most appropriate locus for initiation of programs for preventing emotional problems in their communities.
PubMed ID
1555821 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to animal-assisted therapy with farm animals among health staff and farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92183
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Sep;15(7):576-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Berget B.
Ekeberg Ø.
Braastad B O
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, As, Norway. bente.berget@umb.no
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Sep;15(7):576-81
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agriculture
Animals
Animals, Domestic - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Bonding, Human-Pet
Environmental Health - education - organization & administration
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Methodology Research
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychiatry
Psychology, Clinical
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Green care is a concept that involves the use of farm animals, plants, gardens or the landscape in cooperation with health institutions for different target groups of clients. The present study aimed at examining psychiatric therapists' (n = 60) and farmers' (n = 15) knowledge, experience and attitudes to Green care and animal-assisted therapy (AAT) with farm animals for people with psychiatric disorders. Most respondents had some or large knowledge about Green care, but experience with Green care was generally low in both groups. Both farmers and therapists believed that AAT with farm animals could contribute positively to therapy to a large or very large extent, with farmers being significantly more positive. Most of the therapists thought that AAT with farm animals contributes to increased skills in interactions with other humans, with female therapists being more positive than males. Two-thirds of the therapists believed that AAT with farm animals to a large extent could contribute better to mental health than other types of occupational therapy. There were no differences in attitudes to AAT between psychiatrists/psychologists and psychiatric nurses. This study confirms the marked potential of offering AAT services with farm animals for psychiatric patients by documenting positive attitudes to it among psychiatric therapists.
PubMed ID
18768010 View in PubMed
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A call for primary prevention: reality or utopia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229684
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Dec;34(9):928-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
J. Toews
N. el-Guebaly
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Dec;34(9):928-33
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Forecasting
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Risk factors
Utopias
Abstract
The efficacy of primary prevention of mental disorders has been debated over the years. The debate is complicated by ideology, semantic confusion, methodological difficulties and a paucity of good evaluative studies. This paper reviews newer concepts of primary prevention and mental health promotion, methodological issues, model programs, and inherent ethical concerns. Further evaluative studies and an increased contribution of psychiatrists to the primary prevention debate are recommended as necessary steps in further evolution of the field.
PubMed ID
2692809 View in PubMed
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Canada's programs to prevent mental health problems in children: the research-practice gap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177737
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1069-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2004
Author
John D McLennan
Harriet L MacMillan
Ellen Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1069-71
Date
Oct-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - therapy
Mental health
Preventive Medicine - organization & administration
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Research
Notes
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;40(7 Suppl):24S-51S11434483
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jul 28;323(7306):194-811473908
Cites: Prev Sci. 2001 Mar;2(1):1-1311519371
Cites: Prev Sci. 2001 Dec;2(4):209-2711833925
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Sep;110(3):486-9612205249
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2002 Oct;29(5):620-3912238705
Cites: Prev Sci. 2002 Dec;3(4):257-6512458764
Cites: Future Child. 1999 Spring-Summer;9(1):152-7810414015
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Aug 27;278(8):644-529272896
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Aug 27;278(8):637-439272895
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 12;273(14):1106-127707598
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1990 Aug;58(4):437-462212181
Cites: Pediatrics. 1982 Dec;70(6):883-947145543
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jun;94(6):1027-915249310
Cites: Am Psychol. 1999 Sep;54(9):755-6410510665
PubMed ID
15505271 View in PubMed
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Child psychiatric advice to legal authorities concerning custody and post-divorce visiting rights. Results of collaboration of lawyers and child psychiatrists over a 2-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40746
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1981 Apr;63(4):384-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
G. Brun
K J Rump
P. Teilmann
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1981 Apr;63(4):384-95
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Child Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Psychiatry - trends
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Divorce - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - trends
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Abstract
The need of the judicial system for psychiatric and psychological examination of parents and children prior to decisions concerning custody and visiting rights is illustrated. Further, the possibility of establishing collaboration with legal authorities is discussed. Most child psychiatric and child psychological clinics in Denmark declared themselves willing to take part in the investigation carried out during 1975 and 1976. Within this period the legal authorities referred 232 cases. The indication for expert advice is discussed. Our suspicion that the parties in these selected cases often were suffering from serious mental disorders was confirmed. The difficulties of evaluating the child's views are described. The authors conclude that it is impossible to fix a lower limit for the age at which children are to be heard in court. The legal decision usually accorded with the conclusion drawn from the statement. The investigation resulted in the establishment of a more permanent collaboration of lawyers and psychiatric examiners with regard to custody and visiting rights.
PubMed ID
7315485 View in PubMed
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Children in Beardslee's family intervention: relieved by understanding of parental mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131490
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;58(6):623-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Heljä Pihkala
Mikael Sandlund
Anita Cederström
Author Affiliation
Skellefteå Hospital, Psychiatric Clinic, Skellefteå, Sweden. helja.p@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;58(6):623-8
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Communication
Disclosure
Family
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Guilt
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Parents
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Shame
Sweden
Abstract
Beardslee's family intervention (FI), which is a family-based preventive method for children of mentally ill parents, has been implemented on a national level in Sweden.
Fourteen children and parents from nine families were interviewed about how the FI was for the children. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis.
A central finding was children's sense of relief and release from worry because of more knowledge and openness about the parent's illness in the family.
The results indicating relief for the children are encouraging.
PubMed ID
21900288 View in PubMed
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91 records – page 1 of 10.