Skip header and navigation

Refine By

59 records – page 1 of 6.

[6 months after psychiatric hospitalization. Discharged patients have no housing ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217704
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994
Author
L. Bogren
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Date
Jul-27-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - nursing - psychology - therapy
Housing
Humans
Length of Stay
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology - therapy
Patient Discharge
Social Support
Sweden
PubMed ID
8057734 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abused women's vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: In the light of a caring science perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286928
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Karin Örmon
Ulrica Hörberg
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Battered Women - psychology
Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Women's health
Abstract
The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective.
Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse.
The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research.
Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women.
A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation.
It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.
PubMed ID
27349375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes towards mental illness in Sweden: adaptation and development of the Community Attitudes towards Mental Illness questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92047
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Oct;17(5):302-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Högberg Torbjörn
Magnusson Annabella
Ewertzon Mats
Lützén Kim
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Institution of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. torbjorn.hogberg@sll.se
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Oct;17(5):302-10
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Mental Health Services
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Intention
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Prejudice
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Translating
Young Adult
Abstract
The main purpose for the expansion of supported community care for persons with serious mental illness in Sweden was to ensure the right for these persons to live as citizens in the community. However, earlier research shows that negative attitudes towards mental illness present an obstacle for social integration of persons with serious mental illness. The aim of this study, conducted in Sweden, was to evaluate an existing instrument's (Community Attitudes towards Mental Illness, CAMI), validity and reliability. An additional aim was to adapt and develop the questionnaire to Swedish circumstances. After translation and modification of the original CAMI, the Swedish version of the questionnaire (CAMI-S) was distributed to all student nurses at three different universities in Sweden. The overall Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.90 of the original CAMI-S. A corrected inter-item total correlation excluded 20 items because they showed loading 0.43, was 0.903. A factor analysis of these items revealed that the data could be extracted in three factors labelled as: open-minded and pro-integration, fear and avoidance and community mental health ideology. Finally, in order to reach reliable results in attitude research, it is important to measure the respondent's attitude towards the object in common as well as the respondent's attitude to interact with the object. Accordingly, it is important to add behavioural intention items to the 'new CAMI-S'. Statements exemplifying how something 'ought to be' in an impersonal way have a good degree of stability over time and place.
PubMed ID
18789039 View in PubMed
Less detail

Basic attitudes toward life expressed by persons with long-term mental illness living in a Swedish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123932
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 Jun;33(6):387-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Anette Erdner
Annabella Magnusson
Kim Lützén
Author Affiliation
Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden. anette.erdner@esh.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 Jun;33(6):387-93
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Attitude
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Individuality
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Narration
Personal Satisfaction
Photography
Quality of Life - psychology
Rehabilitation, Vocational - psychology
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
Previous research has shown that persons with long-term mental illness who require prolonged treatment and social support wish to, yet find it difficult to, find meaning or quality in life. A descriptive qualitative design using self-photography and in-depth interviews was used for data collection. The aim of this study was to explore basic attitudes to life as expressed by nine persons with long-term mental illness living in the community. The findings provide insight into the values of relationships, work, and the home for persons with long-term mental illness and indicate that they are cognizant of social norms yet have difficulty integrating these in their daily lives. The study also illuminates the informants' difficulties in creating satisfying and supporting relationships with others.
PubMed ID
22646203 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bridging two worlds: Maori mental health nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123463
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Aug;22(8):1073-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Denise Wilson
Maria Baker
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health & Psychosocial Studies, Auckland University of Technology, North Shore, Auckland, New Zealand. denisel.wilson@aut.ac.nz
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Aug;22(8):1073-82
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Cultural Competency - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Psychiatric Nursing
Abstract
Building an Indigenous mental health workforce is a strategy used to develop culturally responsive and effective mental health services in New Zealand. However, researchers know little about Indigenous (Maori) mental health nursing. We undertook a Maori-centered methodology and grounded theory using focus groups to collect data from 10 Maori mental health nurses. We then analyzed the data using constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling until saturation of the core category and subcategories emerged. "Bridging two worlds," together with two subcategories, "going beyond" and "practicing differently," explains the process Maori mental health nurses used to resolve the tensions they encountered working in the worlds of mainstream and Maori health services. This research provides insight into the tensions Indigenous and minority nurses experience when attempting to integrate cultural perspectives and practices to meet the needs of their patients.
PubMed ID
22695831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood abuse in Swedish female users of psychiatric services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29731
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Jun;12(3):365-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
G. Nilsson
A B Bengtsson-Tops
L. Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Kristianstad University, Sweden. Gabriella.Nilsson@staff.hkr.se
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2005 Jun;12(3):365-71
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - utilization
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - utilization
Parent-Child Relations
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Self Concept
Sweden
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were to investigate: (1) the prevalence of childhood abuse in women admitted to psychiatric services in a county in the south of Sweden; (2) who the perpetrators were; and (3) the women's self-reported consequences of childhood abuse. METHOD: The study had a cross-sectional design and was a part of a more comprehensive study. An anonymous self-reported questionnaire was used which included both closed and open-ended questions. The data material were analysed by means of descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U-test and manifest content analysis. RESULTS: The total number of women who participated in the study was 259, 51% of whom reported experiences of abuse during childhood, with 53% of these having been exposed to more than one type of abuse. The most frequent perpetrator was the woman's parents; mainly the fathers but also the mothers turned out to be frequent perpetrators of abuse. Some 75% of the women reported current psychological problems in adulthood related to abuse in childhood. According to a manifest content analysis, five themes of self-reported psychological problems emerged: psychiatric problems, shortcomings in social relations, poor self-confidence, fears and bad memories.
PubMed ID
15876245 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical approach in psychiatric nursing: study of an advanced practice case].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169218
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Mar;(84):118-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Johanne Goudreau
Marie-Josée Poirier
Francine de Montigny
Author Affiliation
Equipe de recherche en soins de première ligne, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Mar;(84):118-25
Date
Mar-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude to Health
Certification
Clinical Competence - standards
Clinical Nursing Research
Communication
Helping Behavior
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic
Problem Solving
Psychiatric Nursing - education - organization & administration
Quebec
Abstract
Nowadays many people suffering from severe and persistent mental disorders are cared for in ambulatory settings by multidisciplinary teams. Nurses take an important part in these teams. What is nursing practice in this type of setting? A case study was developed from a nurse's clinical practice in order to answer this question. The results suggest that these nursing services are of an advanced practice nature as defined by Hamric et al. (2000).
PubMed ID
16711085 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cognitive-attitudinal aspects of key-worker's talk about their patients in forensic psychiatric institutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165275
Source
Int J Psychiatr Nurs Res. 2007 Jan;12(2):1446-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Susan Sookoo
Val Reed
Ian Brown
Anne Dean
Thomas Ross
Author Affiliation
The Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, James Clerk Maxwell Building, 57 Waterloo Road, London, SE1 8WA, UK.
Source
Int J Psychiatr Nurs Res. 2007 Jan;12(2):1446-58
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Forensic Nursing
Forensic Psychiatry - education - methods
Germany
Great Britain
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Netherlands
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Nursing Theory
Observation
Patient Care Planning
Psychiatric Nursing - education - methods
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
Within an international network study involving four European countries (COMSKILLS), results on clinical-qualitative data are reported and discussed. A total of 103 semi-structured interviews were conducted, representing 45 per cent of the patients involved in the project (N=231).
The coding framework represents a means of identifying and measuring aspects of complexity and specificity in the way in which key workers talk about care in relation to individual patients.
Respondents talked about patient care most frequently in terms of coping behavior and working relationships with patients. The commonest method cited for information gathering was observation. Out of three conceptual levels, ranging from complex and specific responses (conceptual level 3), to relatively general and unspecific remarks (level 1), most responses were coded at Levels 1 or 2.
Taking into account the apparent reluctance of many clinical staff to make use of standardized assessment instruments, systematic treatment-oriented methods able to both allow for valid and reliable assessments and to structure clinical experience is needed. It is expected that complexity and specificity care is referred to will profit from the regular use of such a method (e.g. the BEST-Index).
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Psychiatr Nurs Res. 2007 May;12(3):1473
PubMed ID
17283959 View in PubMed
Less detail

The core characteristics and nursing care activities in psychiatric intensive care units in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86255
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Apr;17(2):98-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Salzmann-Erikson Martin
Salzmann-Krikson Martin
Lützén Kim
Ivarsson Ann-Britt
Eriksson Henrik
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Social Sciences, Högskolan Dalarna, Dalarna, and Department of Health Sciences, Orebro University, Falun, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Apr;17(2):98-107
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Empathy
Female
Humans
Intensive Care - organization & administration - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Refusal - psychology
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Internationally, research on psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs) commonly reports results from demographic studies such as criteria for admission, need for involuntary treatment, and the occurrence of violent behaviour. A few international studies describe the caring aspect of the PICUs based specifically on caregivers' experiences. The concept of PICU in Sweden is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to describe the core characteristics of a PICU in Sweden and to describe the care activities provided for patients admitted to the PICUs. Critical incident technique was used as the research method. Eighteen caregivers at a PICU participated in the study by completing a semistructured questionnaire. In-depth interviews with three nurses and two assistant nurses also constitute the data. An analysis of the content identified four categories that characterize the core of PICU: the dramatic admission, protests and refusal of treatment, escalating behaviours, and temporarily coercive measure. Care activities for PICUs were also analysed and identified as controlling - establishing boundaries, protecting - warding off, supporting - giving intensive assistance, and structuring the environment. Finally, the discussion put focus on determining the intensive aspect of psychiatric care which has not been done in a Swedish perspective before. PICUs were interpreted as a level of care as it is composed by limited structures and closeness in care.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Jun;17(3):224Salzmann-Krikson, Martin [corrected to Salzmann-Erikson, Martin]
PubMed ID
18307598 View in PubMed
Less detail

Creating trust in an acute psychiatric ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91670
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Nov;15(6):777-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Helene Hem Marit
Heggen Kristin
Ruyter Knut W
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. m.h.hem@medisin.uio.no
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Nov;15(6):777-88
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Norway
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Questionnaires
Restraint, Physical - psychology
Trust - psychology
Abstract
The ideal of trust pervades nursing. This article uses empirical material from acute psychiatry that reveals that it is distrust rather than trust that is prevalent in this field. Our data analyses show how distrust is expressed in the therapeutic environment and in the relationship between nurse and patient. We point out how trust can nonetheless be created in an environment that is characterized by distrust. Both trust and distrust are exposed as ;fragile' phenomena that can easily ;tip over' towards their opposites. Trust is not something that nurses possess or are given; it is rather something that they earn and have to work hard to achieve. Regarding themselves as potential causes of distrust and active wielders of power can contribute to nurses developing a more realistic view of their practice. Assuming a realistic middle-way perspective can help to manoeuvre between the extremities of excellence and resignation, which in turn can lead to processes that create trust between psychotic patients and nurses.
PubMed ID
18849367 View in PubMed
Less detail

59 records – page 1 of 6.