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A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of lifestyle and psychosocial problems and persistence of adverse lifestyle over two-year follow-up among Finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265971
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:542
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Eveliina Heikkala
Jouko Remes
Markus Paananen
Simo Taimela
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:542
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Health Services
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity
Questionnaires
Smoking
Abstract
Adolescent'psychosocial problems associate with unhealthy behaviors, but data on co-occurring patterns is sparse. We investigated 1) whether adolescents could be categorized into meaningful subgroups with respect to psychosocial and lifestyle factors, 2) whether the prevalence of physical inactivity, overweight and smoking vary within the subgroups and 3) whether these unhealthy behaviors persist in a two-year follow-up.
The study was based on a subgroup of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort, which consisted of adolescents who replied to a postal questionnaire at 16 years (n?=?6792) and a subgroup of this sample at 18 years (n?=?1552). Latent class analysis (LCA) was performed to establish clusters at 16 years.
Smoking co-existed with emotional and behavioral problems in both genders. Boys with the most inactive lifestyle slept poorly, whereas multiple problems co-occurred among girls. Those with a high body mass index (BMI) separated as groups of their own. Different combinations of adverse lifestyle and emotional and behavioral problems were relatively common in both sexes as only 51% of boys and 67% of girls belonged to the reference cluster with low probability for these findings. Physical inactivity, high BMI and smoking tended to persist over the two-year follow-up.
It seems that lifestyle and psychosocial factors divide adolescents into distinct subgroups in which unhealthy lifestyle patterns remain between the ages of 16 and 18. This may indicate problems in other life areas and expose them to an increased risk of future health problems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884444 View in PubMed
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[A general survey of epidemiologic research in Norwegian psychiatry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236907
Source
Ann Med Psychol (Paris). 1986 Jun;144(6):604-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986

Alcohol-related harm and alcohol consumption in Moscow before, during and after a major anti-alcohol campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203253
Source
Addiction. 1998 Oct;93(10):1501-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
A V Nemtsov
Author Affiliation
Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, Russia. niip@glasnet.ru
Source
Addiction. 1998 Oct;93(10):1501-10
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Death, Sudden - epidemiology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Moscow - epidemiology
Violence
Abstract
To examine the rates of alcohol-related harm in relation to levels of alcohol consumption before, during and after a major anti-alcohol campaign in Moscow.
Changes in State alcohol sale and alcohol consumption and certain forms of alcohol-related harm were observed as a function of time.
Following the 1985 anti-alcohol campaign, State alcohol sales decreased by 38.0% in 1.5 years in Moscow, and total consumption decreased by 28.6%. At the same time, admissions for alcohol-related mental and behavioural disorders, deaths from liver cirrhosis, alcohol poisoning and other blood alcohol positive violent deaths decreased by 63.3%, 33.0%, 50.8% and 50.9%, respectively. There was a linear correlation between medical variables and alcohol consumption during its decrease in 1985-86. An increase in blood alcohol positive violent deaths began in 1987, before the increases in other variables. Growth of total alcohol consumption began in 1987, and continued during all subsequent years, although it was especially high in 1992-93 at the time of the introduction of market reforms in Russia. Alcohol-related mental and behavioural disorders and liver cirrhosis mortality increased after a time-lag following the rise in alcohol consumption.
The findings provide stark evidence of the potential impact of policy measures applied to general alcohol consumption on alcohol-related harm.
PubMed ID
9926554 View in PubMed
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[An epidemiological method for studying the effect of elevated background radiation on the neuropsychic health of children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36500
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1993;93(3):64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
N K Sukhotina
A A Kashnikova
V B Preis
I N Tatarova
T V Terekhina
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1993;93(3):64-8
Date
1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Adolescent
Air Pollution, Radioactive - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Background Radiation - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Mental health
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Russia
Ukraine
Abstract
The children living in 4 regions of Russia contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl catastrophe were investigated. The control group consisted of the children of 2 regions which did not undergo this influence. The investigations were made 1-3 years after the catastrophe took place. An increase of etiologically non-clear asthenic-vegetative disorders was determined in the regions of radiation contamination. They were observed mainly among the children who had light residual organic cerebral deficiency. The authors cannot exclude the impact of the psychogenic factors.
PubMed ID
8042395 View in PubMed
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Association Between Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Severe Mental Illness in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283442
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):589-596
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Patrick D Quinn
Martin E Rickert
Caroline E Weibull
Anna L V Johansson
Paul Lichtenstein
Catarina Almqvist
Henrik Larsson
Anastasia N Iliadou
Brian M D'Onofrio
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):589-596
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Causality
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Several recent population-based studies have linked exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy to increased risk of severe mental illness in offspring (eg, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia). It is not yet clear, however, whether this association results from causal teratogenic effects or from confounding influences shared by smoking and severe mental illness.
To examine the association between smoking during pregnancy and severe mental illness in offspring, adjusting for measured covariates and unmeasured confounding using family-based designs.
This study analyzed population register data through December 31, 2013, for a cohort of 1 680 219 individuals born in Sweden from January 1, 1983, to December 31, 2001. Associations between smoking during pregnancy and severe mental illness in offspring were estimated with adjustment for measured covariates. Cousins and siblings who were discordant on smoking during pregnancy and severe mental illness were then compared, which helped to account for unmeasured genetic and environmental confounding by design.
Maternal self-reported smoking during pregnancy, obtained from antenatal visits.
Severe mental illness, with clinical diagnosis obtained from inpatient and outpatient visits and defined using International Classification of Diseases codes for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia spectrum disorders.
Of the 1 680 219 offspring included in the analysis, 816 775 (48.61%) were female. At the population level, offspring exposed to moderate and high levels of smoking during pregnancy had greater severe mental illness rates than did unexposed offspring (moderate smoking during pregnancy: hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% CI, 1.19-1.30; high smoking during pregnancy: HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.44-1.59). These associations decreased in strength with increasing statistical and methodologic controls for familial confounding. In sibling comparisons with within-family covariates, associations were substantially weaker and nonsignificant (moderate smoking during pregnancy: HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.94-1.26; high smoking during pregnancy: HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.96-1.35). The pattern of associations was consistent across subsets of severe mental illness disorders and was supported by further sensitivity analyses.
This population- and family-based study failed to find support for a causal effect of smoking during pregnancy on risk of severe mental illness in offspring. Rather, these results suggest that much of the observed population-level association can be explained by measured and unmeasured factors shared by siblings.
PubMed ID
28467540 View in PubMed
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Association between spousal suicide and mental, physical, and social health outcomes: A longitudinal and nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283782
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 May 01;74(5):456-464
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-01-2017
Author
Erlangsen
Runeson
Bolton
Wilcox
Forman
Krogh
Shear
Nordentoft
Conwell
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 May 01;74(5):456-464
Date
May-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bereavement
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Mortality
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Spouses - statistics & numerical data
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
Bereavement after spousal suicide has been linked to mental disorders; however, a comprehensive assessment of the effect of spousal suicide is needed.
To determine whether bereavement after spousal suicide was linked to an excessive risk of mental, physical, and social health outcomes when compared with the general population and spouses bereaved by other manners.
This nationwide, register-based cohort study conducted in Denmark of 6.7 million individuals aged 18 years and older from 1980 to 2014 covered more than 136 million person-years and compared people bereaved by spousal suicide with the general population and people bereaved by other manners of death. Incidence rate ratios were calculated using Poisson regressions while adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and the presence of mental and physical disorders.
Mental disorders (any disorder, mood, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, and self-harm); physical disorders (cancers, diabetes, sleep disorder, cardiovascular diseases, chronic lower respiratory tract diseases, liver cirrhosis, and spinal disc herniation); causes of mortality (all-cause, natural, unintentional, suicide, and homicide); social health outcomes; and health care use.
The total study population included 3,491,939 men, 4814 of whom were bereaved by spousal suicide, and 3,514,959 women, 10,793 of whom were bereaved by spousal suicide. Spouses bereaved by a partner's suicide had higher risks of developing mental disorders within 5 years of the loss (men: incidence rate ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.6-2.0; women: incidence rate ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.6-1.8) than the general population. Elevated risks for developing physical disorders, such as cirrhosis and sleep disorders, were also noted as well as the use of more municipal support, sick leave benefits, and disability pension funds than the general population. Compared with spouses bereaved by other manners of death, those bereaved by suicide had higher risks for developing mental disorders (men: incidence rate ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.5-1.9; women: incidence rate ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.9-2.2), suicidal behaviors, mortality, and municipal support. Additionally, a higher level of mental health care use was noted.
Exposure to suicide is stressful and affects the bereaved spouse on a broad range of outcomes. The excess risks of mental, physical, and social health outcomes highlight a need for more support directed toward spouses bereaved by suicide.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28329305 View in PubMed
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Association of Bullying Behavior at 8 Years of Age and Use of Specialized Services for Psychiatric Disorders by 29 Years of Age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274021
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Feb;73(2):159-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Andre Sourander
David Gyllenberg
Anat Brunstein Klomek
Lauri Sillanmäki
Anna-Marja Ilola
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Feb;73(2):159-65
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bullying - statistics & numerical data
Child
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Bullying and being exposed to bullying among children is prevalent, especially among children with psychiatric symptoms, and constitutes a major concern worldwide. Whether childhood bullying or exposure to bullying in the absence of childhood psychiatric symptoms is associated with psychiatric outcomes in adulthood remains unclear.
To study the associations between bullying behavior at 8 years of age and adult psychiatric outcomes by 29 years of age.
Nationwide birth cohort study of 5034 Finnish children with complete information about childhood bullying behavior was followed up from 8 to 29 years of age. Follow-up was completed on December 31, 2009, and data were analyzed from January 15, 2013, to February 15, 2015.
Information about bullying, exposure to bullying, and psychiatric symptoms were obtained from parents, teachers, and child self-reports when children were 8 years of age. Use of specialized services for psychiatric disorders from 16 to 29 years of age was obtained from a nationwide hospital register, including outpatient and inpatient treatment.
Among the 5034 study participants, 4540 (90.2%) did not engage in bullying behavior; of these, 520 (11.5%) had received a psychiatric diagnosis at follow-up; 33 of 166 (19.9%) who engaged in frequent bullying, 58 of 251 (23.1%) frequently exposed to bullying, and 24 of 77 (31.2%) who both frequently engaged in and were frequently exposed to bullying had received psychiatric diagnoses at follow-up. When analyses were adjusted by sex, family factors, and child psychiatric symptoms at 8 years of age, we found independent associations of treatment of any psychiatric disorder with frequent exposure to bullying (hazard ratio [HR], 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4-2.5) and being a bully and exposed to bullying (HR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.3-3.4). Exposure to bullying was specifically associated with depression (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-2.9). Bullying was associated with psychiatric outcomes only in the presence of psychiatric problems at 8 years of age. Participants who were bullies and exposed to bullying at 8 years of age had a high risk for several psychiatric disorders requiring treatment in adulthood. However, the associations with specific psychiatric disorders did not remain significant after controlling for concurrent psychiatric symptoms.
Exposure to bullying, even in the absence of childhood psychiatric symptoms, is associated with severe adulthood psychiatric outcomes that require treatment in specialized services. Early intervention among those involved in bullying can prevent long-term consequences.
PubMed ID
26650586 View in PubMed
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Axis I and II psychiatric disorders in patients with traumatic brain injury: a 12-month follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131849
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(11):1029-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Salla Koponen
Tero Taiminen
Heli Hiekkanen
Olli Tenovuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki , Helsinki , Finland. salla.koponen@helsinki.fi
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(11):1029-34
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antisocial Personality Disorder - complications - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - complications - epidemiology
Personality Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the occurrence of axis I and II psychiatric disorders among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Prospective observational study. Forty-five adult patients, who had attended an emergency unit because of TBI, were recruited. At 12 months, 38 patients were interviewed.
Psychiatric disorders were evaluated using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II).
Before TBI, the 12-month rate of axis I psychiatric disorders was relatively high (39.5%) and the rate of alcohol dependence was especially elevated (18.4%). During the 12 months after TBI, axis I disorders were found in 47.4% of subjects. Six patients (15.8%) were found to have a disorder with an onset after TBI. Of these, five patients had depressive disorders (13.2%). Almost one third of the subjects (29.0%) had personality disorders. Antisocial and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders were the most frequent (10.5%).
Both axis I and II psychiatric disorders are common among patients with TBI. Alcohol dependence and personality disorders are prevalent in individuals prone to TBI, whereas depressive disorders typically develop after injury. Psychiatric disorders should be addressed in rehabilitation, as otherwise they will hinder the recovery after TBI.
PubMed ID
21870901 View in PubMed
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Celiac Disease Is Associated with Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: A Population-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284889
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 May;184:87-93.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Agnieszka Butwicka
Paul Lichtenstein
Louise Frisén
Catarina Almqvist
Henrik Larsson
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 May;184:87-93.e1
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Celiac Disease - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
To determine the risk of future childhood psychiatric disorders in celiac disease, assess the association between previous psychiatric disorders and celiac disease in children, and investigate the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders in siblings of celiac disease probands.
This was a nationwide registry-based matched cohort study in Sweden with 10 903 children (aged?
PubMed ID
28283256 View in PubMed
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128 records – page 1 of 13.