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Do antenatal and postnatal parental psychological distress, and recognized need of help predict preadolescent's psychiatric symptoms? The Finnish Family Competence Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121884
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2013 Apr;44(2):305-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Leena Pihlakoski
Andre Sourander
Minna Aromaa
John A Rönning
Päivi Rautava
Hans Helenius
Matti Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, 20014, Turku, Finland.
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2013 Apr;44(2):305-19
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Mental health
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - psychology
Abstract
In a prospective population-based study, mothers and fathers of 1,247 children reported their physical and mental health during pregnancy, after delivery, within the child's first 18 months of life, and at 12 years. Additionally, maternal health clinic nurses rated parents' well-being and perceived need for support. At age 12, child outcomes were also measured using CBCL and YSR externalizing and internalizing scales. Results indicate that both ante- and postnatal maternal distress predicted future externalizing problems in offspring. Conversely, fathers' postnatal distress predicted subsequent internalizing problems. Furthermore, mother's depressed mood in the first trimester best predicted the child's externalizing problems at age 12. Nurses's ratings of mother's antenatal and perinatal need for support, perinatal distress, and family's need for support were associated with both internalizing and externalizing problems at age 12. Maternal antenatal distress increases the risk of offspring's externalizing problems in preadolescense, and postnatal distress in either parent increases the risk of internalizing problems. Parental self-reports and indirect ratings from health care providers during pregnancy and infancy may therefore reliably recognize offspring at risk for subsequent psychiatric symptomatology.
PubMed ID
22869397 View in PubMed
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[Neurological and psychopathological syndromes in the follow-up period after exposure to ionizing radiation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52486
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2000;100(4):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K N Loganovskii
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2000;100(4):15-21
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Brain Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
MMPI
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Radiation Injuries - complications
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - psychology
Ukraine
Abstract
Neurologic, psychiatric and psychophysiologic (computed EEG) examinations were carried out in 100 Chernobyl accident's survivors who had got acute radiation sickness (ARS), in 100 Chernobyl liquidators who worked for 5 or more years in the zone (1986-1987) as well as in control groups: 20 normal age- and gender-matched adults and 50 veterans of the Afganistan war with consequences of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 50 veterans with both PTSD and mild closed head injury. Left-hemispheric cortical-limbic and diencephalic right-hemispheric syndromes were revealed. Left-hemispheric frontal-temporal-limbic dysfunction was associated with schizophrenia-like syndrome, while diencephalic right-hemispheric dysfunction--with the affective syndrome. Doses more than 0.3 Sv (including the ARS-patients) resulted more frequently in the left-hemispheric cortical-limbic and schizophrenia-like syndromes. Diencephalic right-hemispheric and affective syndromes were more frequently observed after the exposure to doses less [corrected] than 0.3 Sv. Development of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in the irradiated Chernobyl survivors could be due to radiation-induced left fronto-temporal-limbic dysfunction following irradiation doses more than 0.3 Sv (including the ARS-patients). The cerebral patterns of schizophrenia and postradiation brain damage are similar. Persons exposed fo 0.3 Sv and more could be classified as the group of higher risk of the development of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The authors suggest that ionizing radiation may be an environmental trigger factor which can cause schizophrenia in the predisposed subjects.
PubMed ID
10812665 View in PubMed
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Parental mental health after the accidental death of a son during military service: 23-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128303
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Pål Kristensen
Trond Heir
Pål H Herlofsen
Øyvind Langsrud
Lars Weisæth
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, Oslo, Norway. Pal.Kristensen@nkvts.unirand.no
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avalanches - mortality
Death
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Fathers - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Grief
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Military Medicine - methods
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Nuclear Family
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Abstract
We prospectively studied parental mental health after suddenly losing a son in a military training accident. Parents (N = 32) were interviewed at 1, 2 and 23 years after the death of their son. The General Health Questionnaire and Expanded Texas Inventory of Grief were self-reported at 1, 2, 5, and 23 years; the Inventory of Complicated Grief was self-reported at 23 years. We observed a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (57% and 45%, respectively), particularly major depression (43% and 31%, respectively). Only one mental disorder was diagnosed at the 23-year follow-up. Grief and psychological distress were highest at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Spouses exhibited a high concordance of psychological distress. Mothers reported more intense grief reactions than did fathers. The loss of a son during military service may have a substantial impact on parental mental health particularly during the first 2 years after death. Spouses' grief can be interrelated and may contribute to their psychological distress.
PubMed ID
22210364 View in PubMed
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A psychiatric 12-year follow-up of adult patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21143
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 1999 Jan-Feb;33(1):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M E Zöller
B. Rembeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Göteborg University, Sweden. madeleine.zoller@ms.se
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 1999 Jan-Feb;33(1):63-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Neurofibromatosis 1 - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
The impact of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) on psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses, personality variables and self evaluation was studied in a 12 year-follow-up of patients with NF 1 in the city of Göteborg, Sweden. 48 living adult patients with NF1 were re-evaluated in 1990 in a 12 year long time follow up study. The patients were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The following scales were used; the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS), the Karolinska Scales of Personality inventory (KSP) and the Self-Evaluation Scale (SES). A significant psychopathology was found in the NFI patients, p
PubMed ID
10094241 View in PubMed
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[Psychiatric morbidity in connection with surgical treatment of epilepsy. A short-term follow-up of patients with amygdalohippocampectomy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35158
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Sep 18;157(38):5245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-1995
Author
A S Naylor
B. a Rogvi-Hansen
L V Kessing
C. Kruse-Larsen
T G Bolwig
M. Dam
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk afdeling O, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Sep 18;157(38):5245-50
Date
Sep-18-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amygdala - surgery
Child
Denmark
English Abstract
Epilepsy - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Female
Hippocampus - surgery
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the occurrence of psychiatric disorders in epilepsy patients who had received surgical treatment, especially amygdalohippocampectomy (AHE), for the relief of medically intractable seizures. Forty-seven subjects, treated during the period 1987-1991 in the Danish epilepsy surgery programme (EPIKIR), entered a retrospective interview study. Of these, 37 had undergone AHE. Preoperative psychiatric morbidity was assessed through interview and available case notes, including a routine psychiatric interview. Postoperative psychiatric morbidity was assessed by the use of the Present State Examination. A total of six subjects (five AHE subjects) developed depressive disorders of various duration and severity after operation. In three subjects this occurred "de novo". No paranoid-hallucinatory psychoses developed within the follow-up period (a minimum of one year), and the presence of psychiatric disorders could not be associated with either lateralization of cerebral dominance of histopathological findings. Thus, depression appears to be the most frequent psychiatric problem following epilepsy surgery. Although the present study mainly deals with AHE, this finding is in accordance with the results of recent findings concerning anterior temporal lobe resection.
PubMed ID
7483040 View in PubMed
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[Somatization mental disorders based on data on the dispensary care of the employees of a large industrial enterprise].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213122
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1996;96(6):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
V Ia Gindikin
T Z Omarov
Sh V Chomakhidze
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1996;96(6):54-8
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Occupational Health Services
Petroleum
Psychopathology
Russia
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Syndrome
Abstract
Psychosomatic borderline disorders were observed in 366 individuals during prophylactic medical examination of 675 employers of big oil-chemical enterprise. The main group consisted of 189 cases of psychosomatic disturbances. They included the very borderline disorders (neuroses, psychogenic depressions, psychopathies) as well as cyclothymias and schizothymic personal deviations too. The majority of disorders were presented by depressive and asthenic syndromes cases. The direct correlation was found between the frequencies of such disturbances rise and the duration of industrial work in conditions of professional hazards. The role of social and cultural factors in psychosomatic disorders development was also established.
PubMed ID
9072897 View in PubMed
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[The assessment at a sanatorium of the mental status of children who were victims of the Chernobyl catastrophe]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35105
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1995 Nov-Dec;(6):31-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
V I Lysenko
N P Drinevskii
T F Golubova
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1995 Nov-Dec;(6):31-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Child
English Abstract
Female
Health Resorts
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Mental health
Power Plants
Psychological Tests
Psychophysiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Psychic disorders are not infrequent findings in children who survived Chernobyl accident. This fact necessitates special psychotherapeutic, psychocorrective and psychoprophylactic treatment which should be added to standard therapeutic care in sanatoria.
PubMed ID
8713306 View in PubMed
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[The assessment of mental disturbances (mental illness) as a qualifying sign of the severity of bodily injuries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210897
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1996 Oct-Dec;39(4):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu P Kalinin
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1996 Oct-Dec;39(4):29-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - psychology
Adult
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Violence - psychology
Abstract
Analyzes the problem of assessing the severity of bodily injury leading to mental disorders in the victim. Discusses a working classification of mental disorders resultant from various environmental factors (injuries), intended for forensic medical experts, psychiatrists, and physicians of other specialties. Offers a new methodological approach to forensic medical and psychiatric expert evaluation of such cases. Describes the typical examples from practical forensic medical and psychiatric expert evaluations.
PubMed ID
9026963 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.