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ADHD in adult psychiatry. Minimum rates and clinical presentation in general psychiatry outpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91338
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):64-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nylander L.
Holmqvist M.
Gustafson L.
Gillberg C.
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Clinic, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. lena.nylander@skane.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(1):64-71
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Personality Assessment
Questionnaires
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence and comorbidity of persisting attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adult psychiatric outpatients. Consecutive patients, first visits excluded, at a general psychiatric outpatient clinic were offered a screening for childhood ADHD with the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS). One hundred and forty-one patients out of 398 (35%) completed and returned the scale. Patients above or near cut-off for ADHD (n=57) were offered an extensive clinical evaluation with psychiatric as well as neuropsychological examination. The attrition was analysed regarding age, sex and clinical diagnoses. Out of the screened sample, 40% had scores indicating possible childhood ADHD. These 57 patients were invited to the clinical part of the study, but 10 declined assessment, leaving 47 (37 women and 10 men) who were actually examined. Thirty of these (21 women and nine men) met diagnostic criteria for ADHD at the time of examination. Among the patients with ADHD, affective disorders were the most common psychiatric diagnoses. The rate of alcohol and/or substance abuse, as noted in the medical records, was also high in the ADHD group. In the WURS-screened group, 22% (30 patients assessed as part of this study and one person with ADHD previously clinically diagnosed) were shown to have persisting ADHD. Therefore, it is clearly relevant for psychiatrists working in general adult psychiatry to have ADHD in mind as a diagnostic option, either as the patient's main problem or as a functional impairment predisposing for other psychiatric disorders.
PubMed ID
18991159 View in PubMed
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Advantages and limitations of web-based surveys: evidence from a child mental health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147314
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Jan;46(1):69-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Einar Heiervang
Robert Goodman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Unifob Health, Bergen, Norway. Einar.Heiervang@rbup.uib.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Jan;46(1):69-76
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies - economics - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys - economics - methods - standards
Humans
Internet - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic - methods - standards - utilization
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires - economics - standards
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Web-based surveys may have advantages related to the speed and cost of data collection as well as data quality. However, they may be biased by low and selective participation. We predicted that such biases would distort point-estimates such as average symptom level or prevalence but not patterns of associations with putative risk-factors.
A structured psychiatric interview was administered to parents in two successive surveys of child mental health. In 2003, parents were interviewed face-to-face, whereas in 2006 they completed the interview online. In both surveys, interviews were preceded by paper questionnaires covering child and family characteristics.
The rate of parents logging onto the web site was comparable to the response rate for face-to-face interviews, but the rate of full response (completing all sections of the interview) was much lower for web-based interviews. Full response was less frequent for non-traditional families, immigrant parents, and less educated parents. Participation bias affected point estimates of psychopathology but had little effect on associations with putative risk factors. The time and cost of full web-based interviews was only a quarter of that for face-to-face interviews.
Web-based surveys may be performed faster and at lower cost than more traditional approaches with personal interviews. Selective participation seems a particular threat to point estimates of psychopathology, while patterns of associations are more robust.
PubMed ID
19921078 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorders increase the risk of completed suicide--irrespective of other psychiatric disorders. A longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89362
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 May 15;167(1-2):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2009
Author
Flensborg-Madsen Trine
Knop Joachim
Mortensen Erik Lykke
Becker Ulrik
Sher Leo
Grønbaek Morten
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Centre for Health and Society, and Department of Health Psychology, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. tfm@niph.dk
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 May 15;167(1-2):123-30
Date
May-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Knowledge of the epidemiology of suicide is a necessary prerequisite for developing prevention programs. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk of completed suicide among individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUD), and to assess the role of other psychiatric disorders in this association. A prospective cohort study was used, containing three updated sets of lifestyle covariates and 26 years follow-up of 18,146 individuals between 20 and 93 years of age from the Copenhagen City Heart Study in Denmark. The study population was linked to four different registers in order to detect: Completed suicide, AUD, Psychotic disorders, Anxiety disorders, Mood disorders, Personality disorders, Drug abuse, and Other psychiatric disorders. Individuals registered with AUD were at significantly increased risk of committing suicide, with a crude hazard ratio (HR) of 7.98 [Confidence interval (CI): 5.27-12.07] compared to individuals without AUD. Adjusting for all psychiatric disorders the risk fell to 3.23 (CI: 1.96-5.33). In the stratified sub-sample of individuals without psychiatric disorders, the risk of completed suicide was 9.69 (CI: 4.88-19.25) among individuals with AUD. The results indicate that individuals registered with AUD are at highly increased risk of completed suicide, and that registered co-morbid psychiatric disorders are neither sufficient nor necessary causes in this association.
PubMed ID
19359047 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of eating disorders in Norwegian psychiatric institutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213980
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 1995 Nov;18(3):263-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
K G Götestam
L. Eriksen
H. Hagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 1995 Nov;18(3):263-8
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Bulimia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim was to establish the prevalence of eating disorders in psychiatric patients.
The total inpatient (n = 8,942) and outpatient (n = 10,125) Norwegian psychiatric population was investigated with a staff-report questionnaire.
The prevalence of eating disorders in the inpatient population was 3.8% for women and 1.6% for men. In the outpatient population, the differentiated diagnoses anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and the comorbidity of AN+BN was 5.7%, 7.3%, and 1.6% for women, and 0.8%, 0.7%, and 0.3% for men (this could be reduced to AN and BN prevalences of 7.3% and 8.9% for women and 1.0% and 1.0% for men).
The level of the prevalence figures is in the expected area, thus the present study confirms earlier studies with smaller psychiatric populations.
PubMed ID
8556022 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of legal outcome following pretrial forensic assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6875
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1994 Apr;39(3):161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
J. Arboleda-Flórez
H L Holley
J. Williams
A. Crisanti
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Calgary General Hospital, Alberta.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1994 Apr;39(3):161-7
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Expert Testimony - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Insanity Defense - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Referral and Consultation - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This paper constitutes the first stage of data analysis in a larger controlled study designed to assess the effect of a forensic psychiatric assessment on legal disposition defined in three ways: 1. the number of days spent in custody prior to trial; 2. the number of sentenced days of incarceration; and 3. the conviction rate. A historical cohort design was used to follow two cohorts of individuals remanded, pretrial, to Southern Alberta Provincial Correctional Centres between 1988 and 1989. The study cohort consisted of all offenders detained who received a forensic psychiatric assessment. The comparison cohort consisted of a random sample of persons detained who did not undergo a forensic assessment. Because of small numbers, individuals below the age of 18 and women were excluded from study. This paper compares socio-legal characteristics of study and comparison subjects in order to better understand forensic psychiatric referral patterns and identify potentially confounding factors that would need to be controlled in subsequent analyses of legal outcomes. No differences were noted with respect to educational level but forensic subjects were found to be slightly older (average of 31 years compared to 29 years). Aboriginal peoples (Native Indian, Inuit and Metis) were three times more common among non-forensic offenders. Forensic patients were more likely to have had a prior forensic assessment but less likely to have a prior criminal detention. In addition, forensic patients were three times more likely to be charged with a crime against a person and counted more offenses in the target episode than comparison subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8033022 View in PubMed
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An examination of the relationship of homelessness to mental disorder, criminal behaviour, and health care in a pretrial jail population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211183
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;41(7):435-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
P A Zapf
R. Roesch
S D Hart
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;41(7):435-40
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homeless Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Patient Care Team - utilization
Personality Assessment
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine the prevalence of homelessness and its relationship to mental disorder, criminal behaviour, and health care.
Interview and file data were collected for 790 male admissions to a large, pretrial jail facility over a 12-month period.
A significant relationship was found between homelessness and severe mental disorder as well as between homelessness and prior psychiatric history. There were no significant differences found between the homeless and the nonhomeless on the types of crimes for which they were incarcerated or on contact with health care services within the past year.
The findings indicate the need for a link between the jail and community services for homeless individuals.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Psychiatry 1997 Mar;42(2):212
PubMed ID
8884032 View in PubMed
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Ante- and perinatal circumstances and risk of attempted suicides and suicides in offspring: the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127072
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Antti Alaräisänen
Jouko Miettunen
Anneli Pouta
Matti Isohanni
Pirkko Räsänen
Pirjo Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. antti.alaraisanen@oulu.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Single Parent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Physiological
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate those ante- and perinatal circumstances preceding suicide attempts and suicides, which have so far not been studied intensively.
Examination of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,742), originally based on antenatal questionnaire data and now followed up from mid-pregnancy to age 39, to ascertain psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring and suicides or attempted suicides in the offspring using nationwide registers.
A total of 121 suicide attempts (57 males) and 69 suicides (56 males) had occurred. Previously unstudied antenatal factors (maternal depressed mood and smoking, unwanted pregnancy) were not related to these after adjustment. Psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring were the risk factors in both genders. When adjusted for these, the statistically significant risk factors among males were a single-parent family for suicide attempts (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.62-8.50) and grand multiparity for suicides (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.15-6.18). When a psychiatric disorder in females was included among possible risk factors for suicide attempts, it alone remained significant (OR 15.55, 8.78-27.53).
A single-parent family was a risk factor for attempted suicides and grand multiparity for suicides in male offspring even after adjusting for other ante- and perinatal circumstances and mental disorders in the parents and offspring. Mothers' antenatal depressed mood and smoking and unwanted pregnancy did not increase the risk of suicide, which is a novel finding.
PubMed ID
22327374 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression and behavioral problems among adolescents with recurrent headache: the Young-HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265088
Source
J Headache Pain. 2014;15:38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Brit A Blaauw
Grete Dyb
Knut Hagen
Turid L Holmen
Mattias Linde
Tore Wentzel-Larsen
John-Anker Zwart
Source
J Headache Pain. 2014;15:38
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Headache - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Abstract
It is well documented that both anxiety and depression are associated with headache, but there is limited knowledge regarding the relation between recurrent primary headaches and symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as behavioral problems among adolescents. Assessment of co-morbid disorders is important in order to improve the management of adolescents with recurrent headaches. Thus the main purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of recurrent headache with anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems in a large population based cross-sectional survey among adolescents in Norway.
A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 1997 (Young-HUNT1). In Young-HUNT1, 4872 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were interviewed about their headache complaints and completed a comprehensive questionnaire that included assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression and behavioral problems, i.e. conduct and attention difficulties.
In adjusted multivariate analyses among adolescents aged 12-14 years, recurrent headache was associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.61-2.61, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24925252 View in PubMed
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Are there mental health differences between francophone and non-francophone populations in manitoba?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256463
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2014 Jul;59(7):366-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Mariette Jeanne Chartier
Gregory Finlayson
Heather Prior
Kari-Lynne Mcgowan
Hui Chen
Randy Walld
Janelle De Rocquigny
Author Affiliation
Research Scientist, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Assistant Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2014 Jul;59(7):366-75
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Surveys
Hierarchy, Social
Humans
Language
Life Style
Male
Manitoba
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Francophones may experience poorer health due to social status, cultural differences in lifestyle and attitudes, and language barriers to health care. Our study sought to compare mental health indicators between Francophones and non-Francophones living in the province of Manitoba.
Two populations were used: one from administrative datasets housed at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and the other from representative survey samples. The administrative datasets contained data from physician billings, hospitalizations, prescription drug use, education, and social services use, and surveys included indicators on language variables and on self-rated health.
Outside urban areas, Francophones had lower rates of diagnosed substance use disorder (rate ratio [RR] = 0.80; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.95) and of suicide and suicide attempts (RR = 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.79), compared with non-Francophones, but no differences were found between the groups across the province in rates of diagnosed mood disorders, anxiety disorders, dementia, or any mental disorders after adjusting for age, sex, and geographic area. When surveyed, Francophones were less likely than non-Francophones to report that their mental health was excellent, very good, or good (66.9%, compared with 74.2%).
The discrepancy in how Francophones view their mental health and their rates of diagnosed mental disorders may be related to health seeking behaviours in the Francophone population. Community and government agencies should try to improve the mental health of this population through mental health promotion and by addressing language and cultural barriers to health services.
PubMed ID
25007420 View in PubMed
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Assessing the needs for care of non-psychotic patients. A trial with a new standardized procedure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225306
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;26(6):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
A D Lesage
S J Cope
S. Pezeshgi
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Hôpital Louis-H. Lafontaine, Montréal, Canada.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1991 Dec;26(6):281-6
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Certificate of Need - standards
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quebec
Abstract
Recent psychiatric epidemiological studies using standardized interviews in the community have yielded high rates of non-psychotic disorders. The implications for service provision in terms of treatment and planning remain unclear. No methodology exists to link the individual needs for care and services to problems associated with disorders. The Needs for Care Assessment Schedule (NFCAS) is a relatively new procedure for assessing the needs of long-term mentally ill patients, mostly psychotic and attending psychiatric services. We report here a trial application of a modified version of the NFCAS on a sample of 39 non-psychotic patients, most of whom were attending psychiatric outpatient services. The results show that the modified procedure requires further refinement to achieve acceptability and reliability. Some improvements are suggested for refining items and for the collation of others. The difficulties encountered underline the key issues in developing such technology: specifying the threshold for recognizing the problems, detailing the interventions considered appropriate, defining the model of care and specifying the composition of the research team.
PubMed ID
1792559 View in PubMed
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184 records – page 1 of 19.